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May 28, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY

8.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY

Mortgage Bill
Awaits Signing
By Comstock
Measure Permits Courts
To Postpone Foreclosure
Hearings Until 1935
LANSING, May 27.-()-The leg-
islative remedy today for the plight
of thousands of Michigan home own-
ers threatened with the loss of their
property and with eviction was a
two-year moratorium on mortgage
and land foreclosures.
Two measures permitting courts to
continue pending foreclosure ' pro-
ceedings until March 1, 1935, awaited
Governor Comstock's signature for
enactment into law. Containing a
statement declaring the existence of
an emergency with respect to "home
ownership," each bill becomes law
with the governor's signature. They
were given immediate effect by the
legislature.
The two bills moved swiftly to pas-
sage Friday. After the Senate had
passed the measures, substitutes for
original house bills, by overwhelming
majorities, the other branch readily
concurred in amendments.
Charging through the heaviest
calendar of the session Friday, the
House approved and sent to the
Senate the first old-age pension bill
in the State's history to appear likely
to receive legislative sanction. It
also passed a $15,000,000 school relief
measure and voted to abolish the
controversial private shooting pre-
serves act.
A Senate sub-committee mean-
while sought to perfect a draft of a
three per cent, all-embracing sales
tax to provide revenue for the ad-
ministration program. It would levy
against retail sales as well as utility
service charges.
WOMEN'S
ACTIVITIES
Intramural baseball has proved un-
usually popular this season with Sor-
osis leading in the number of teams
entered. Martha Cook and Alpha Phi
have been making up for their lack
of players by practicing in their re-
spective backyards after supper.
The DKE's challenge game with
the Alpha Phis resulted in an over-
whelming victory for their team in
spite of playing left-handed. To re-
deem themselves the girls arranged
for a game with Sorosis in the DKE
yard to be played next week.
* * *
Tournaments for golf and tennis
have been seriously interrupted by
the frequent rains. All participants
have been urged to make arrange-
ments with their opponents to play
off the matches on the first clear day.
The draws are posted on the bulletin
board in the Women's Athletic Build-

Polic< Arrest Woman At Anti-Hitler Riot

Summer Term
Students Urged
To Enroll Now;
Notification Of Intention
To Attend Session Should I
Be Made To Secretary
Students planning to attend the
Summer Session were urged again
yesterday by Dean Edward H. Kraus
to counsel with instructors and to
notify Prof. Louis M. Eich, secre-
tary of the session, as soon as pos-
sible.
It is especially advisable for those5
who intend to enroll in any of the
four camp periods offered to make
definite arrangements before the end
of the regular school year, he said.
Enrollment will begin in the Law
School June 16, in the Graduate
School June 21, and in all other
schools and colleges June 23. The
session will begin June 20 in the
Law School and at the Geology and.
Geography Station in Kentucky, and
June 26 in all other divisions.
In order to facilitate arrangements
for the accommodation of prospec-
tive students, however, it is desirable
that all persons expecting to attend
notify the secretary before June 14,
Dean Kraus said.
Requirements for admission are
set by the schools andcolleges in-
dividually, but in general summer
courses are open to all who are qual-
ified to pursue them. Students from
outside colleges and universities must
present statements from administra-
tive offices in the institutions in
which they are regularly enrolled to
show that they are in good standing.
Each student will be required to-
enroll in the school or college in
which the major work is to be done,
and if he desires to elect work in an-
other in which the fee is higher, he
must pay the higher fee. Fees for
the various divisions are announced
in the bulletin.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
day, May 31, at 7:30 in Room 6, An-
gell Hall. The lecture will be illus-
trated by moving pictures.
Graduate Outing Club:.Final Out-
ing of the year Tuesday, May 30,
Memorial day. Hike, games, possibly
swimming, and supper. Meet in front
of Angell hall at 3 :30, will return
around 8:00. All graduates come andj
bring your friends.
Varsity Band: Rehearsal at Mor-
ris Hall Monday, May 29, 7:15 p. m.
All members must attend. The Band
will not march on Memorial Day but
will give a concert on Wednesday af-
ter which there will be a free show
for Band members.
Varsity Glee Club: Important re-
hearsal at 5 p. m. on Monday,
May 29, League Baliroom. Everyone
bring his music. The club will as-
semble at 8:15 p. m. in the ball-
room for the concert Monday eve-
ning.
Presbyterian Students and their

friends are having their Spring:
Party at the Huron Hills Country
Club Monday evening. The dinner
at the Club is to be followed by a
dance. Any who are interested must
make reservations for transportation.
Phone 6005.

Plan Job Exchange
I or Fraternities
Plans for an interfraternity job
exchange are being laid by the In-
terfraternity Council, according to
Maxwell T. Gail. '34, secretary-treas-
f r tha rn il "h rnil

i1
i
i
1
I

Russian Student Club: Important 'ii Vi1Lne councin.lr zinciik
business meeting Monday, May 29, of the idea is to have fraternities
Room 306 Michigan Union, 8:30 2 end men to work at other houses
m g ninstead of having them work at their
m "_ own house," Gail said.
V Z n n!Tryouts for the council will begin
ri~A 1~IU, V ±iCL~IL V~IiL3

rr ~ t'~, z1en~s uiesy,
China, will present the views of the
recent development of Sino-Japanese
Crisis, Monday, May 29, at eight p.
In., atthe Natural Science Auditor-
ium, under the joint auspices of Kor-
ean Students Club and Chinese Stu-
dents Club. Public is invited.
Chinese Students: Last meeting of
the club for the semester on Mon-
day, May 29, 7:30 p. m. at Lane Hall.
All Chinese students are requested to
attend the meeting.
If yft write, we bave it.
Correspondence Stationery,
Fodntaix Pens, Ink, etc.
Typewriters all makes.
Greeting Cardsfor eaerbod.
O.DMORRI LL
~L ..State St., Amn Arbor.

to collect information for the house
managers of houses next week, GaI
declared, stating that he hoped to
have the work completed by the end
of the semester.
WYKOFF NOW TEACHER
Frank Wykoff, former University
of Southern California sprint star
and holder of the world's 100-yard
record, has joined the faculty of th-
Frank Moran school for boys at Atas-
cadero, near Los Angeles.
PHONE
Holland Furnace Co.
for your
FURNACE and CHIMNEY
SPRING CLEANING
The Clean, Efficient Way

-Associated Press PhotU
This woman hustled away by a. mounted policeman was one
of several anti-Hitler demonstrators arrested during a riot at a New
York pier when Hans Weideman arrived en route to Chicago to repre-
sent Germany at the world's fair.

,d

Book Exchange
Is Organized To
elp Students
Students .will be able to regain two
thirds of the cost of their books at
the Michigan Book Exchange, a re-
cently organized establishment which
will operate on a strictly business
basis.
Students merely take their used
books to the exchange and state the
amount they wish to receive for the
book. When the Exchange has sold
the bookit will return to the original

Sociedad Hispanica Has
Election Of New Officers
Robert O. Thomas, '36, will be
president of the Sociedad Hispanica
for next year, according to an an-
nouncement by the nominating com-
mittee of the club. Other officers
of the club will be Florence V.
Schultz, '34, vice-president and social
chairman, Evelyn C. Walsh, '34, sec-
retary; and Walter C. Schaefer, '35,
treasure.
owner 80 per cent of the proceeds.
The other 20 per cent will be a com-
mission to defray expenses.

JUST PUBLISHED
"MODERN CREATIVE DESIGN
AND ITS APPLICATION"
By HERBERT A. FOWLER, B.S.D.- $450
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN .... .
? U NIV ERS ITY
WAH R'S BOOKSTORE
316 State Street

up,
A

&4nnouncing .
the party of the year

II-

" Ioh oes hIsu sMile
AA oth oesHis Work I1na Sort 1

1933

SENIOR

I

BALL

FREE!

MICRO-BERLOU

I

T
w
0

* * *


.ra

d
U

The participation cup which was
held by Chi Omega last year is being
hotly contested for this season. Sor-
osis, led by Martha Neuhardt, '35,
athletic manager, is running the for-
mer champions a' close race.
The novel archery-golf tournament
that is being played off has aroused
so much interest that an evening has
also been set aside to accommodate
the players.
New athletic managers for next
year are to have a meeting this week
to make several plans for the fall.
It is imperative that every house be
represented, Miss Marie Hartwig, in-
tramural coach, announced yester-
day, for radical changes may be
made in the organization of activi-
ties next year.

""""""

A SAFE STORAGE AND
INSURANCE FOR YOUR FALL
AND WINTER GARMENTS

June r4th

SUMMER GARMENTS

T
H
0
R
0
G
H
P
R
E
S
S7

A scientific process that insures your garments
against damage by moths. You need have no fear
this summer about your garments after they have
been cleaned and pressed with MICRO-BERLOU.
This process supplements the safe storage that is
offered free of charge to GREENE'S customers. The
Micro-Berlou process is also used with the same
success when applied to rugs and furniture. Free
Delivery.

MICRO-TEX

demand care and precision in their cleaning to
retain all of their brilliance and summer smart-

ishness.

The super cleaning method. A service that as-
sures your garment of having, a longer cleaning
life, gives dresses more sheen and body, makes
garments water repellant, and adds life to their

ACE BRIGODE
and His 1 4-Piece Band
with Feature Floor Show
Coming from the Merry Garden, Chicago

WHITE FLANNELS

colors. All of these rejuvenating
obtained for only ten cents extra.

merits may be
Free Delivery.

Guaranteed

not to shrink and Panamas are given
our Special Attention.

CHICKEN
DINNER

E

Pullen's Cafe

Sunday

I

I

TICKETS

$3.00

BEER!

On Sale at the Union and League or
from Committee Members

516 East Liberty - 1110 South University - 802 South State
Phone 2~2~1

Mack & Co. Basement

BEER!

Ill 1111111

DON LOOMIS

MICHIGAN UNION

MONDAY, MAY 29

- -1+XTt1 4-111, Q9]klf all fll-itlrl vv r

II

III

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