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May 24, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aseball

Team

Seeks Revenge

n Game At

Lansing Today

{

Spartans Took
First Game, 5-1,
Early In Season
Patehin Or Tillotson Will
Pitch For Wolves; Ware
Or Wistert Plays First
Indiana Here Friday
Two Week-End Games To
End Home Tilts With
Conference Schools
Michigan's Varsity. baseball team
will be seeking revenge for an early
season defeat handed them by Mich-
igan State when they play the Spar-
tans at East Lansing at 4:00 p. m.
today.
Rivalry is always keen when the
two State schools meet in any sport,
and should be keener today as the
Wolves want to even up State's 5 to 1
victory.
Coach Ray Fisher indicated that
he would use either Art Patchin or
Harry Tillotson on the mound
against the Green and White team.
It is probable that the two will both
work part of the game.
The rest of the Wolverine lineup
will be' the same as it has been
since Teitlebaum's injury in Lafay-
ette last week, with the exception of
the first base position.
Ware May Start
If a right hander starts for State,
Fischer will use Stan Ware on the
initial sack, while
Whitey W i s t e r t
will hold down the
corner if a port
Oder pitches for
the Spartans.
Michigan w ill
play its last two
home games of the
season here Friday>
and Saturday
when they meet
Indiana and Chi-
cago, respectively. TtrEZT '
The H o o s i e r s
and Wolverines are in a tie for
third place behind Illinois and Min-
nesota, at present, and Friday's
game may determine whether Fish-
er's men will hold third or fouth
place in the final standings.
Whitey Wilshire will pitch for the
Hoosiers against Whitey Wistert
Wilshire, a sophomore, has lost only
one game this year, that to Mich-
igan. He pitched 15 innings agains
Ohio State recently to win two
games in one day.
The Wolverines will- .have a
chance to fatten their sagging bat.
ting averages Saturday against the
lowly Chicago team. Fisher said tha
he would give Patchin or Tillotson a
chance to add to their list of mound
victories,
Keller To Hang Up
Shoes After July
COLUMBUS, O., May 23.-(A)--
The spiked shoes that carried Jack
Keller to a probable new world rec-
ord of 14.1 seconds in the 120-yar
high hurdles Saturday are goin
into storage for all time next July
The lithe hurdling star of. Ohi
State University says he'll call i
"quits" as soon as he has appeare
in the National Collegiate cham
pionships at Chicago June 16 and 1
and the National A. A. U. meet in
connection with the Century of Prog-
ress Exposition there June 30 and
July 1.

BERRY REFUSES OFFER
Gil Berry, former Illinois gri
halfback and captain, recently turnec
down an offer to play with the Bos-
ton Braves of the National Profes-
sional football league. He wants ti
become a Big Ten coach.
CORBETT'S
SALE
is the talk of the
campus .. .
We arc giving values that can-
not possibly be duplicated by
any store that has rent to pay.
No high rents attached to our
prices. We own our own build-
One visit will convince you . . '

6 Michigan Track
Stars End Careers
With, Big Ten Title
A happy group of tracksters ar-
rived home from the Conference
meet Sunday. They had carried on
Michigan tradition and won a chain-
pionship when another team was fa-
vored to win. They had subdued the
Hoosiers, 6 to 47.
The victory came as a fitting closet
to the track careers of several Wol-
verine seniors; Charlie DeBaker, NedJ
Turner,.Bill Hill, Doc Howell, Hawley
Egleston and Rod Cox among the
point winners. It meant the third
Conference track championship for
Coach. Charlie Hoyt in three years;;
and the thirteenth outdoor title for
Michigan in 22 years.1
Track authorities are calling thej
1933 edition of the track team "the
greatest outfit that ever representedI
Michigan on the cinders." And they
point out that the greatness of the
team is indicated by the manner in
which the championship was won.
Indiana took eight of the 16 indivi-
dual championships to only two for
the Wolverines. Yet team strength
saw Michigan through to victory by
a comfortable margin.
No one man can be cited as being
directly responsible for Michigan's
success. Indiana had the stars but
Indiana lost. Team balance was what
carried the Wolverines through.
Coach Hoyt was almost right when
he said, "Michigan had no athletes
but a pretty good track team, and In-
diana had the athletes and not much
of a team."
Michigan had the athletes and the
track team too.
Si gma Nu Aims To
Retain Ball Title
Sigma Nu, last year's fraternity
softball champions, are bent on re-
peating .in the present intramural
tournambnt. Monday they white-
washed Phi Alpha Delta by a 4-0
score. Shutouts are becoming quite
a habit with Zit Tessmer, star
pitcher. He has pitched two no-hit
games thus far and only allowed two
hits against Phi Alpha Delta. In ad-
dition he connected with a home
rtm in the third inning to put the
game away for Sigma Nu. Alpha Tau
Oniega will be the next opponent to
determine one of the semi-finalists in
the lower bracket. The game will take
place Thursday at. 5:15 p. m.
t Tau Delta Phi, favored to win this
year's tennis tourney, were the vic-
tims of an upset at the hands of
Theta Kappa Psi in a quarter-final
- mijatch. Four other teams, Kappa Nu,
eh Phi Epsilon Pi, Chi Psi and Zeta Psi
t have advanced as far as the quarter-
fials.
In the all-campus tournament,
Only two entrees, Young and Sass
have reached the quarter-finals and
they are scheduled to meet in the
near future.
FRESHMAN
LANTERN DANCE
Michigan League Ballroom
MAY 27 9-12
d Tickets $1.00 at League Desk
g and Angell Hall
GET THE HABIT!
- SHOP at
ie a~ere Lo ve.s.lyar
309 63UT. MAN STEET

State Netmen
Take Michigan,
Seven To Two
First Win For Spartans
In Modern Com petition;
A ppelt Shows Well

MAJOR LEAGUE
STAN DINGS

New YO
Wa shin
Chic ag
Philade
Cle v(lal
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phi:
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EAST LANSING, May 23.-- (Sp- St. Louis,.
cial)-Michigan State's tennis team Boston ... .
swept through tape University of Dctroit,
Michigan netmen, 7 to 2, this after- Hayworth;
noon, giving the Spartans their first Stewart, Ri
win over the Wolverines in modern New York
competition. and Dickey
State won five of the six singles debrand, H
matches and two of the three doubles Chicago,
contests. Stanley Weitz, Spartan cap- ry; Boston,
tain, continued undefeated, defeat- Kline and1
ing the Wolverine star, Siegel, 6-3, Philadel:
6-3. Weitz has not lost a set in com-- McDonald,
petition this year. Louis, 6--1
Appelt Wins Twice3
Joe Appelt, who Coach Johnstone NA
has termed as "coming along like a
racehorse" figured in both of Mich- Pjttsburgh
igan's sole wins. In the singles he New York.
defeated Roose 3-6, 6-1, 6-0, andI St. Louis..
teamed with Siegel in the doubles Brooklyn
to take Norris and Goodwin 8-6, 6-3. Boston .. .
State players swept their matches Cincinnati
in straight sets in all but three Chicago ...
matches, Baldwin losing to Link 6-1, Philadelphi
5-7, 2-6 and Sandusky bowing to Pittsburg
Goodwin 4-6, 7-5, 2-6 in the singles Padden; B
and Niesen an4 Baldwin losing to Ryan and
Weitz and Loose 4-6, 6-3, 1-6. Philaded
Johnstone Disguested David; Ch
Coast Johnstone expressed himself Grimes, R1
as "thoroughly disgusted" after the New Yo]
matches, saying that the team "just que and I'
seemed to lack the punch." He -0, Lucasi
praised the work of Joe Appelt great- Boston,
ly, however, saying that the matches Cantwella
of the past week and a half have 1-5-0C. C
stamped Appelt as the outstanding
member of the squad.-
Howard
BOWIE EVENT OFF for the U
BOWIE, Md., May 23.-()-The signed to

ussell, Burkc and Sewell.
k, 8-9-1, Allen, Breannan
; Cleveland, 6-7-0, .Hil-
:udlin and Myatt,
7-8-1, Gaston and Ber-
0--6- -3, Andrews, Welch,
Ferreil.
phia, 8 -12 0, Mahiaiffey,
Grov and COchlra.; St.
1-2..
T(ONAL LEAGU lJ

W.A.A. Presents
Horse Show At
Fair Grounds
Sue Thomas Takes First
In Stunt Riding; Kanter
Wins Form Events
More than 200 spectators gathered
out at the Fair Grounds yesterday
ft ernoon to witness the annual
horse-show presented by the Wom-
en's Athletic Association. Members of
the Undergraduate Outing Club also
participated in the show.
,uc Thomas won the musical
chairs for women, and Bob From-
berg won the potato race.
The three-gaited form riding for
women was won by Mary Ann Pad-
dock. Ann Dunbar came in second,
a nd Nancy Johnson took third place
in this event.
In the men's division, Bradford
Carpenter was winner, followed by
Bob a Kcever, second, and Walter
Schaefer third.
Elizabeth Kanter was winner of the
five-gait riding for women, Betty
Greve coming in second and Irene
Thomas third. Miss Kanter and Joe
Torrentz rode off with the ribbon
for form riding in pairs. Irene
Thomas and Joe Dolgerokoff fol-
liowed them, while Harriet Whitcher
and Arthur Robinson came in for
third honors.
President Ruthven and Captain
Custis were judges for the events. A
blue ribbon was awarded for first
place, red for second, and white for
third.

...........

PLAY & BY-PLAY
By AL NEWMAN
Football Overemphasis
='' * *
ADDITIONAL insurance against cidedly inferior to the average stu-
football overemphasis with its dent in mentality.

ia......
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attendant evils was taken out by the
directors of the Big Ten in their de-
cision last week to support the orig-
inal ruling of the Conference pro-
hibiting post-season games.-
According to Prof. Ralph W. Aigler,!
chairman of the governing board for!
the present year, the vote implied
that conditions under which the orig-
inal law was made had not changed
sufficiently to warant the removal of
the ruling.
Have conditions clnged? Let us
consider the motives which led to the
formation of the Big Ten conference
and the restrictions laid upon ath-
letics in the universities comprising
it:
Stripped of the iel fa nfare
adorning the most pcpul of college
sports, we find the intensely nervous
and exhausting g.'mne that is football
from the standpoint of the player.
Only too often, the college foot-
ball player is considered to be a spe-
cies of automaton highly specialized
and developed to compete in a sport.
Many consider football players de-
If you write, we have it.
Correspondence Stationery,
Fountain Pens, Ink, etc.
Typewriters all nnkes.
Greeting Cards for evberyody.
0. A. MORRI L

PRIMARILY the college athlete is
a student. Statistics at Michigan
show that football players are bet-
ter than average in their scholastic
work. Take the twenty best gridiron
men on the Wolverine roster and
their scholastic overage will top that
of twenty men picked at random
from the campus at large.
Protection of the athlete as a stu-
dent is the aim of the Big Ten. No
less than one-fourth of the year is at
present taken up with a distracting
mental strain for the conference ath-
lete, and the ruling prevents the fur-
ther penalization of the athlete as a
student, which comprises the major
evil of over-emphasis.
In addition to this, we have foot-
ball as a distraction to the student
treme, is at least well-substantiated
to a certain extent.
Conditions -have not changed in a
direction which would tend to obviate
the possibility of football over-em-
phasis since the original ruling was
made. If anything, the tendency has
been in the opposite direction.
W HITE BUCK SHOES
--New Shipment just in-
ALL
c1- 7 !Cc

-, s',etorlic

3rooklyn, 0--4--0, Carroll,
Sukeforth.
phia, 9-19--9, Rhein and
icago, 5--12-0, Tinning,
Achmon1 and Hartnett.
rk, 6--l, Parmelee, Lu-
Mancuso; Cincinnati, 4--9
and Lombardi.
3 - 10 - 3, Frankhouse,
and Hargrave, St. Louis,
arleton and Wilson.

51

3.4 S. State St., Ann Ar'br',

AUER A BEAR.
J. Auer, former linre
niversity of Michigan,
play next fall with
ship Chicago Bears of
Professional League.

star
has
the
the

LOW COST TO ATTEND OPENING
of
ACENTURY OF PROGRESS,
AT CHICAGO, SATURDAY, MAY 27

mile-and-a-sixteenth Rowe Memorial
Handicap, which was scheduled as
an added feature at the Bowie race
track Saturday, has been cancelled.
The Southern Maryland Agricul-
tural Association, in aunouncing to-
day that the race had been called off,
gave as the reason the fact entries
for the $3,500 added event could not
be obtained.
THE RELIABLE WINDOW
CLEANING COMPANY
Ceilings and Walls Washed
Awnings - Floor Waxing
Service and Courtesy
A. G. Marchese Phone 9363

Champion:
National F

MUNDUS BREWING
COMPANY STOCK
--at---
Original Offering, Price
$1.00 per Share
For Further Information Call
J. L. WADE ,43M
Local Representative for
D. M. WOODRUFF & CO.
Detroit, Michigan

.;
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. "":

$ IO ROUND
TRIP

Going 11:23 p.m. (E.T.) May 26 or 1:19 a.m. and
8:35 a.m. May 27. Return until May 28. Coaches only

$(20 ROUND
TRIP

Going May 25, 26 and 27.
Return within 10 days.

Still
at the
some low
price
3195,

Special Road Trip Pullman Rates - - - All Expense Tours
AVOID HIGHWAY CONGESTION - TRAVEL SAFELY BY RAIL
MICH IGANICENTR iAL
TRAINS USE STATION ADJOINING GROUNDS
FOR MORE INFORMATION - CONSULT TICKET AGENT

Jt213 East Liberty

. -

0oolI n
best

meicils
rrobaccos-

tak eour

Linen and
._, Seersucker
SUITS
Single
and DoubI
Breasted
SUITS
$10.50 and
$11.50
STRAW HATS and
PANAMAS
$1.95 to $4.50

r
e

It's no wonder your
cigarettes are good
Tobacco now makes up one-fifth of all the
Cxports of the Republic of Turkey. From the
districts famous for producing the finest
Turkish, most of the crop is shipped to this
country.
Of the Samsoun crop 70% is exported to
America; 68% of the Smyrna crop; and even
greater percentages of the crops of Xanthi
and Cavalla.
The reason Americans go so far for a
special kind of tobacco is ... FLAVOR. For
when real Turkish is left out you miss its
rich, spicy taste and rare aroma.
In Chesterfield the right amounts of the
right kinds of Turkish are cross-blended with
nild, ripe domestic tobaccos. You can taste
the difference.


/z.

d

SWEATERS
With or Without Sleeves
$1.00 -$1.50- $2.45

SOX
Pastel Shades
- 4 pr. $1.00
7 - &71111h

29c

:.

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