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May 19, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-19

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UR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~ -
4 Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. , Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmvaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue.
Chicago. National Advertising Service, Inc., 11 West 42nd
St., New York, N. Y.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTIOR ....... . .... . .C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR... .............. .1RACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR. . ...............CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: Ralph G. Coulter, William G. Ferris,
John C. Healey, Robert B. Hewett, George Van Veck,
Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara. Bates, Eleanor Blum, Lois Jotter, Marie
Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Caspar S. Early, Thomas Groehn, Robert
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Manuel Levin, Irving
F. Levitt, David G. Macdonald, S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell, George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph Shapiro, Marshall D.
Silverman, L. Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
Marjorie Beck, Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies, Jean Han-
mer, Florence Harper, Marie Held, Margaret Hiscock,
Eleanor Johnson, Hilda Laine, Kathleen MacIntyre,
Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Mary O'Neill,
Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret Spencer.
- BUSINESS STAFF
Teieplione 2-1G14
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. ..BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER...................HARRY R. BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......Donna C. Becker
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess, William B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer. John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Catherine McHenry; May See-
fried, Virginia McComb, Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, CaPolyn Wose.
FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1933

no matter what he might play, but when the
Brahms Concerto is the medium of his inspira-
tion, he even transcends Heifetz-and that is the
very most that could be said of him.
Dr. Moore and his Choral Union can well be
proud for the very creditable way in which they
lived up to the difficult test of appearing on the
same program as the great violinist. In any case
it would have been unfairly hard to maintain the
level of the latter half of the program, but, con-
sidering the almost unsingable spots and the ex-
treme demands which the score of the Walton
work made upon the chorus, they are to be doubly
congratulated. "Belshazzar's Feast,", is an easy
and almost melodious work in comparison to the
Stravinsky "Psalms" of last year-the hard, stark
contours of the latter, which is a composite of bitsi
and fragments, a mosaic of stone, have been
broadened and rounded into flowing sweeps of
sound by the Englishman, and consequently the
"Feast" gains a continuity that is immediately
appreciable.
The soloist of the oratorio, Chase Baromeo, was
finely suited in the dignity of his voice and man-
ner to the demands of his role. Equally well
chosen for the singer was the aria from the Verdi
"Manzoni" Requien.-Latin, religious subjects,
and recitatives are things that few vocalists can
do as well as this serious and intelligent basso.
The Bax "In the Faery Hills" which opened the
program, is interesting, in its admitted emotion-
alism, as compared to inevitable expressiveness of
the Brahms, which closed it. Arnold Bax always
seems washed by the fogs and mists of his native
land, so that his orchestral tints blur and pale
into an appealing and softly sensuous oneness of
color. Only Brahms can write a concerto that is
both virtuosic and musical-and it is a tempta-
tion to say that only Heifetz can play it as it
should be played. But it is entirely safe to state
that, this undoubtedly is the violinist at the peak
of his career, completely matured and still retain-
ing that phenomenal technique which will be one
of the legends of our generation.
Kathleen Murphy
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
edi,.-The names of communicants will, however, be. re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible,
CO-OPERATIVE APATHY AND
TUITION INCREASE

have to drop out, that students are more than
"incidental." By this same mass pressure we can,
and will force the Regents not to raise tuition.
We are not interested in the kindness and sincer-
ity of the Regents. Those are .irrelevant factors.
We are interested only in that they vote, NO
TUITION INCREASE.
We are not merely negative in our demands.
We offer positive ways of balancing the Univer-
sity budget, reasonable, sound, fair, and logical.
These are included in the Resolution to be pre-
sented to the Regents. This Resolution will be in
the hands of every student. Every means is being
taken to reach all students, particularly those
vitally affected. Enough preliminary work has
already been done in order to tremendously en-
courage the success of today's demonstration.
This will be a red letter dAy for Michigan. It
will witness a far greater achievement than any
football victory. It will sound the opening of a
new, broader, student consciousness at Michigan,
because of their own mass achievement. It will
serve as an example to other colleges throughout
the country of what mass united, student action
can do to win student justice.
Leon Gropper
The Theatr

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THE FRIEND OF
BERNARD SHAW
BY ROBERT HENDERSON
We find in "Who's Who," the fat red volume
about the British notables, that Robert Loraine
served in the South African War with distinction
and that he also served in the World War from
1914 to 1918, in the Royal Flying Corps, that he
was twice dangerously wounded in the air, six
times mentioned in dispatches and was awarded
the Mons Cross, the Military Cross, and the dis-
tinguished service order for conspicuous gallantry
and skill in shooting down enemy planes. Curiosly
enough, Tom Powers served under Mr. Loraine as
a captain in Mr. Loraine's Air Corps during the
World War.
Besides being a flying ace in the war Robert
Loraine is probably the only living aviator who
has been flying more .or less continuously since
1910. In that year he held several world records
and. made many extraordinary flights. He made
the first flight across the Irish Sea, for which he
was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Aero
Club.
He made the first flight in a storm, flying from
Bournemouth to the Isle of Wight through thun-
der and lightning and rain of tropical violence;
Bleriot, Morane, Farman, and other experts de-
claring it was quite impossible for any aeroplane
to live in such a storm so that his death was as-
sumed and the aerodrome flag half-masted be-
fore news of his safe -landing was received.

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It

End Of A
Student Council...
Asupreme indication of the worth-
lessness of the body on this cam-+
pus known as the Student Council came Wednes-
day in the refusal of all candidates for member-
ship on it and the three candidates for its presi-
dency to accept nomination.
It is not strange that these men refused to allow
their names to be associated with the Council.
For a year its every attempt at student govern-
ment has been characterized by failure so gross
that its name has become synonomous with im-
potence.
The withdrawal of the candidates was followed
by the resignation of all members who would have
acted on the Council next year, with a single ex-
ception, and by the decision of Charles R. Racine,
present president of the Council, to call off the
elections, which were to have taken place yester-
day.
Racine's move culminated a semester of consci-
entous effort to develop in the Council something
of the leadership the student body has a right to
have. He failed only because he was trying to
make something out of nothing.
Nobody will deny that there is a definite need
on this campus for a vigorous and sincere Council
What has been clearly demonstrated is that under
the present system the selection of such a Council
is impossible. Thus it is clear that a new kind of
Council is necessary. The power to make the de-
sired change resides with the Senate Committee
on Student Relations. This committee has quite
naturally refused to abolish the present Council
until proof of its weakness should come.
In the events of the past two days the commit-
tee has all the evidence that could be desired.
A new system for choosing councilmen and a
new sort of Council are to be proposed by the stu-
dent committee that is to be appointed by Dean,
Bursley. Nobody knows what the plan they will
offer will be, but we may be certain that it will
propose a vast improvement over the sort of stu-
dent government we have had for the past few
years.
-N

To The Editor:
Today at 2:45 p. m.! ! To the casual reader this
means absolutely nothing. And why should it?
And when you add that this is the last meeting
of the Regents this year, he is equally bored by
your exclamation marks. You remind him that
this is the day when we must all get together and
exert a tremendous mass pressure to avert "a rad-
ical tuition increase," (President Ruthven's
words), and the reaction of many readers is to
quit reading at this point, with a contemptuous
"just another Red making a noise."
But then, how could it be otherwise? Bom-
barded on all sides from almost the very cradle
up through his college years by the spirit of
"rugged individualism," by the philosophy of get-
ting ahead of the next man regardless of
what happens to the next man, by an education
which molds introverts, which creates a sterile
coiling up within oneself -how can the psychol-
ogy of this college student be conducive to an all
pervading spirit of co-operation, comradeship,
group interest, social struggle, mass achievement?
The attitude of a great many students toward
the imminent drastic tuition increase is one or
more of the following:
1. Total ignorance of such a possibility.
2. The vague assurance that somehow it
will take care of itself. Besides it's for
next year, so why worry now?
3. For the rich students: this doesn't af-
fect me.
4. For the very poor students who will
definitely be forced out: "Oh, well the
tuition increase is the final blow. I'm
through. Nothing can be done. What a
break!"
5. For the borderline students: "I'll have
to squeeze by somehow. A job this
summer? A University loan? A job at
some fraternity? Why did they have to
raise tuition now, of all times?"
6. For the greatest percentage of stu-
ents, rich and poor alike: "Don't
bother me. I've got troubles of my
own."
We recognize that these are the attitudes of a

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When asked why he had made such a desperate
light after the committee had definitely forbid-
[en him to fly while the storm raged, Mr. Loraine
answered that he was tired hearing the aeroplane
eferred to as a fair-weather toy and had deter-
nined to remove that reproach. Among his many
other achievements in aviation he was also the
irst to send a wireless message from an aeroplane
n flight. It is perhaps unnecessary to add that
ae has flown from New York to Detroit for the
ehearsals in the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season.
In "Who's Who in the Theatre," we find four
:olumns filled with the list of parts he has
>layed. They show a versatility that scarcely any
other player of our time can equal, ranging from
Shakespeare's beautiful portrait of King Henry
the Fifth, and Petruchio the shrew-tamer, and
Benedick the batchelor, to Sheridan's frightened
Bob Acres, and reckless Charles Surface, Gold-
mith's nervous young Marlowe and Dumas bold
'Artagnan and Congreve's exquisite Mirabell.
Somerset Maugham wrote "Smith" and "Loaves
and Fishes" for him and at the Haymarket The-
itre in London he acted in Barrie's "Mary Rose,"
Ienry Arthur Jones, "Dolly Reforming Herself,"
Bernard Shaw's "Getting Married" and as Ru-
dolph Rasendyl in "The Prisoner of Zenda."
His Captain Bluntchli in Shaw's "Arms and the
Mlan" has been described as the finest light com-
edy performance of our time. Bernard Shaw him-
self wrote of Loraine's performance as Cyrano de
Bergerac that it was the most moving piece of
acting he had ever seen.
Loraine's performance of Strindberg's grim
tragedy, "The Father," was hailed by London and
New York as the finest acting of our generation.
Edgar Wallace wrote in the London Morning Post,
"There is no doubt about the genius of Robert
Loraine, there can be no question that Robert
Loraine is far and away the greatest actor of our
generation." I myself saw his performance in "The
Father" with Haidee Wright and Dorothy Dix in
London. It exhibited a force and macabre power
such as I have never seen duplicated before or
since in the theatre.
That Robert Loraine is a good judge of a play,
is proved by the fact.that immediately on reading
Shaw's "Man and Superman," he secured the act-
ing rights of the comedy and produced it as his
greatest success in all the cities of America and
in London. It was such a sensation that he was
free for some time to retire from the stage and
devote his time to his other great interest-avia-
tion.
From "Man and Superman" grew Mr. Loraine's
remarkable friendship with George Bernard Shaw.
When Shaw recently visited New York city Mr.
Loraine was his host. Recently .he achieved an
outstanding success as the miIjister in Benn
Levy's "The Devil Passes." He was co-starred with
Katharine Cornell this winter in "Lucrece"; and
in "Springtime for Henry" he comes to play the
comic and befuddled Mr. Jelliwell in a cast, in-
cluding Violet Heming, Tom Powers and Rose Ho-
bart, that is "all-star" with a vengeance.

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considerable portion of the student body. And
yet, in the face of this formidable array of co-
operatively apathtic attitudes the NATIONAL
STUDENT LEAGUE is confident of the success of
today's demonstration. This confidence is based
not on -a Utopian faith, but on a careful, prelim-
inary, personal contact-survey. Of the 8,000 stu-
dents enough are affected to the extent that they
are VITALLY concerned over the tuition increase;
concerned enough to join together today and
voice their demands before the Regents for:
1. No tuition increase.
2. Maintenance of the present faculty-stu-
dent ratio.
3. Power of faculty dismissal to be vested in
in a democratically elected faculty com-
mittee, which shall decide upon all cases
of dismissal at an open publicized hearing.
At their last meeting the Regents gave non-
committal answers to these demands. In effect
therefore, they put the matter up to the student
body: If you accept like sheep whatever we de-
cide, that's fine. If you raise sufficient protest,
what else can we do but abide by your demands?
"Students are only incidental" to the Univer-
sity, said Nicholas Murray Butler, President of
Columbia, recently, to the student Committee for
Reinstatement of Donald Henderson, who was
fired from Columbia for his political activity. This
same attitude was tvnified by a member of our

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Visiting Cards and'
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SPECIAL DISCOUNT to University Girls on Wedding Stationery

Musical Events

SECOND FESTIVAL CONCERT
HEIFETZ -AND SOME OTHER THINGS
There are violinists-and then there is Heifetz.
One might as well count the brush strokes of a
Rembrandt as to try to delineate and encompass
such a technique as his within the range of words,
written or spoken. Definitions like "down-bow
- - 4 -) isr.:i. ..t n . ) -anr '4 ninn +-n'' mI. f .o r a1

Mr. Loraine has at various times been lesse
and manager in London of the Drury Lane, Th
Garrick, The Criterion, The Duke of York, Th
Savoy and The, Appollo Theatres, He is a grea
~a hrml1nft, a,'tn r f mrse' hut he is ne xtra

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