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May 07, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 7, X9^3

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY 7, 1933

Win Pulitzer Awards In Literature, Art

A.S.M.E. Elects
Kohl PresidentI
For Next Year
Bockrath And Boin Alsoj
Become Officers; Prof.
Hawley Is Honored ,
Election of officers for the school
year 1933-34 featured the regular
meeting of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, held Friday}
night at the Union. Paul R. Hartig,
'33E, presided over the meeting.
Frederick S. Kohl, '33E, was select-
ed as president, with Robert E. Bock-
rath, '34E, as vice-president, and,
Adolph R. Bohn, '33E, secretary and
treasurer.
Prof. Ransom S. Hawley of the,
mechanical engineering department,
honorary chairman, was presented
with a cigarette holder and cigarettes
as'a token of the society's apprecia-
tion of his services to it in the past.
Gordon L. Jensen, also of the me-
chanical engineering department, de-
scribed an inspection tour that he
is planning, for one of his classes
through the Goddard and Goddard
plant in Detroit.
Discussion of the annual spring
get-together in Detroit was held. The
society will be the guest of the De-
troit branch of the A. S. M. E. It
is planned that the meeting will take
the form of an inspection trip
through the Morgan and Wright
plant of the U. S. Rubber Company,
followed by a banquet at the Detroit
Yacht
The principal speaker of the eve-
ning, Prof. H. C. Anderson, delivered
an ddress on public utility rates.
The data which he presented has
required more than 25 years to ac-
cumulate, it was said. The address
stressed the point as to what should
be the basis on which a public utility
may determine its income.
WOMEN' S
ACTIVITIES

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Century Of Progress Exposition
To Feature Startling Exhibitions
CHICAGO, May 6.,- Exhibits of if a blast furnace, and the open'
unique and marvelous creation will hearth furnace and the Bessemer
be shown at the Century of Progress converters will also be shown in ac-
Exposition to be held here this sum- tion. Where it is impossible to use
mer, according to recent announce- molten metal, a substitute will bel
ments of the executive board in found that has the same appearance
charge of the fair. Competitive ex- under proper lighting conditions.
hibitions have been eliminated and Leading railroads will present an
working displays demanded. exhibit of railway transportation
The most interesting and start- which will include the largest elec-
ling exhibits, they claim, will deal tric locomotive in the world. The
with scientific advancement, al- story of the oil industry from the
though the fair does not limit itself sinking of the well to the sale of the
to this field. History, art, architec- gasoline at the filling station will be
ture, and education will receive con- told. Machines used in the manu-
siderable attention, but science will facture of hosiery, clothing, and
occupy the center of the stage. shoes will also be shown in opera-
Foremost in interest will be the tion.
industrial exhibits. One of the larg- In the field of biology, a new type
est automobile manufacturers will of exhibit will be shown. This will
exhibit a completely-equipped auto- show a year's growth of a twig in
mobile assembly plant, and the story the short space of 75 seconds. The
of automobile manufacture will be twig shown will be magnified 300
told from the start of the assembly times to produce on a mirror a re-
line until the machines are driven flection nine feet across. The growth
off under their own power at the for one year is signified by an ex-
end of the line. pansion of 18 inches in the size of
Will Manufacture Tires the twig, which is accomplished
In demonstrating the manufacture gradually by an electric motor run-

Eight Professors Protest
Holding Of World's Fair
NEW YORK, May 6.-Announcing
thcir approval of a boycott of the
Chicago World's Fair, eight Colum-
bia professors signed a letter to J. W.
Crabtree, executive secretary of the
National Educational Association,
protesting against the non-payment
of school teachers' salaries in Chi-
cago.

KEEP YOUR EYE
ON THIS SPACE
for
PU LLEN'S
CAFETERIA
AN NOUNCEMENT
THIS WEED

-Detroit Free Press Photos
Three winners of Pulitzer prizes for 1932 are shown above. T. S.
Stribling (left, above) was awarded the Pulitzer prize for fiction for his
novel, "The Store," a story of southern life. Allan Nevin's (right, above)
"Grover Cleveland" was awarded the prize for biography. H. M. Tal-
burt of the Washington Daily News is shown with his cartoon, "The
Light of Asia," which won a $500 prize as the best cartoon of the year.

Rules Formulated

For Spring

Games

United States
Can Grow Tea,

Rules governing the silver cup
award which will be made to the
fraternity whose freshman and soph-
omore classes are best represented
at the spring games have been
formed by Hugh Grove, '34E, chair-
man of the games committee. They
are as follows:
1. The cup will be presented to
that fraternity with the highest
number of freshmen and sophomores
at the tug of war and spring games,
in proportion to the number of
freshmen and sophomores in the
house; the houses eligible to compete
will have a total number of freshmen
and sophomores of not less than
eight.
2. In case of a tie, the cup will go
to that house with the most under-
classmen on the winning side.
3. The cup will be placed in the
fraternity for four and a half months
of the school year (not including
Summer Session) and will be placed
in the Union at the end of the four
and a half months, where it will re-
main until the following spring
games.
4. Eacht freshman belonging to a
fraternity will report to the Union
lobby with sufficient paint on, and
leave identification cards with Union
committeemen.
5. Each sophomore belonging to a
fraternity will report te Waterman
Gymnasium and -leave identification
cards with the Union committeemen
4 to be stationed there.

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Bartlett Sa s s Competing against the weather
J rather than more equal opponents,
the women entered in the tourna-
"Growing tea in Washington and ments have taken advantage of those
Oregon is entirely feasible and prac- few clear days to play off as many!
ticable," stated Prof. Harley H. Bart- matches as possible. In tennis the
lett, head of the botany department, third round begins next week.
commenting yesterday on experi- I

of tires, all the materials used in the
processes will be shown. Crude rub-
ber and the compounding ingredients
will be on display. The treating and
testing of the tire and the automatic
wrapping process will be shown in
detail. A complete tire will be made
every 10 minutes before the eyes of
the spectators.
The story of steel will be vividly
portrayed, including the operation
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued'from Page 2)
Building. Cafeteria service. Profes-
sor Norman H. Anning of the Mathe-
matics Department will speak on
"Some, Mathematical Curiosities."
Interfraternity Council: Meeting on
Wednesday, May 10, at the Union at
which the president and judiciary
committee for the coming year will
be elected.
Rev. Thomas L. Harris, advisor in
Religion at Harvard University and
formerly of St. Andrew's in Ann Ar-
bor, will speak on "Religion and the
Present Revolution" at 4:15 in Na-
tural Science Auditorium on Tues-
day, May 9. Former friends are par-
ticularly urged to attend.
La Sociedad Hispanica will meet
Wednesday, May 10, at 7:30 p. m.,
in the Michigan League. Professor
Wagner will give a talk on Spanish
music, supplemented by records. All
interested are invited to attend.
Presbyterian Student a p p o i n t-
ments:
6:30-Breakfast at the Island.
9:30 - Student Classes at t h e
Church House.
10:30-Morning worship. Theme,
"Green Pastures."
5:30-Social Hour and Fellowship.
6:30-Student Forum. Subject,
"Dissecting Missions." A discussion
to be lead by a group of Senior Medi-
cal Students. Election of officers to
be May 7th. and 14th.

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Canoeingi
1933 Season NoW Open!
OPEN EVERY DAY 9 A.M. -12 P.M.
SAUNDERS CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River

ments recently conducted at the Uni-
versity of Washington.
"Weather conditions identical with
those found in Japan can be matched
in many parts of the United States,"
Professor Bartlett continued. "Tea
has been grown successfully in Sum-
merville, S. C., under the auspices of
the United States Department of Ag-
riculture." 4.
From the economic standpoint
labor must be considered, Professor
Bartlett pointed out. "Labor in Japan,
and other tea-producing countries,
is much cheaper than in America.
Tea leaves must be picked while they
are young, since when they become
old and leathery the tannin content
increases and the aroma decreases."
Although tea-picking machines are
available, picking tea by hand is
preferable, according to Professor
Bartlett.
"The tea shrub is by no means a
tropical plant as is commonly
thought, since it survives in mild cli-
mates and can withstand some frost."
Professor Bartlett's conclusion is
that "there is no climatic reason why
tea should not be. grown in the
United States."
Roosevelt, will cease publication.
The decision to discontinue the
magazine, the MacFadden Publica-
tions said, followed-upon Mrs. Roose-
velt's decision to withdraw as edi-
torial supervisor.

ning on a reduction gear.

Draws are.being mate for the golf
tournament which will be announced
next week. Qualifying scores of 75
points out of 24 arrows may still be
handed in for the archery handicap
tournament.
The Alpha Phis have been re-
ported warming up with a game of
catch after supper,' and not to be
outdone the residents of Martha
Cook have been holding practice
baseball games in the back yard.
Rain has altered the regular sched-
ule so teams must be ready to play
when notified.
W. A. A. awards are to be given at
the League-W. A. A. installation
banquet Wednesday. Friday after-
noon an exhibition of games will be
given before Lantern Night. Mixed
archery, tennis, and badminton'
matches are to be played, and base-
ball games are scheduled. There will
be open house at Palmer Field House
and trips of inspection are to be
arranged.

THE WHITE FLANNEL SEASON IS HERE!
Cleaning and Pressing
of WHITE FLANNELS
i
is a SWISS' Specialty
Phone 4191
rA
209 South Fourth Avenue 7051/2 North University Avenue
C. H. SCHROEN - F. P. HALL - ERWIN W. SCHROEN

'i

VISITING CARDS
We are offering-
Plate and 100 CARDS for..............$2.50 and Up
100 CARDS from your plate..................$1.50
100 CARDS (Process Engraving) .............$1.75

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