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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E MiCHIGAN DAILY

Will Help,
ners Pay Off
I Mortgages
Aid To Be Given
e In Need If Act
es Both Houses
.oosevelt Plan

Guards Escort Iowa Mob Leaders To Encampment

First, Second Mortgages
Will Be Accepted For
Collateral On Notes
(By The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 3.-Provi-
sions for special loans to debt-bur-
dened farmers faced with the pros-
pect of losing their homes will be the
first portion of the farm mortgage
bill administered when congressional
action on the entire Roosevelt farm
program is completed.
It was learned today that Henry
Morgenthau, Jr., farm board chair-
man, and governor-designate of the
farm credit administration which
will begin functioning May 27, has
completed arrangements for giving
quick aid under this provision. It is
separate from the bill's authorization
to refinance up to $2,000,000,000 in
farm mortgages through issuance of
Federal land bank bonds whose in-
terest will be guaranteed by the gov-
ernment.
Expect Compromise
The special aid provision author-
ized an advance of funds by the Re-
construction Corporation. The Sen-
ate bill proposed that this advance
be limited to $200,000,000; the House
$300,000,000. A compromise at $250,-
000,000 may be approved by congres-
sional conferees who are expected to
adjust such differences in the meas-

-Associated Press Photo
Some of the men arrested as a result of an Iowa mob attack on a district judge are shown as they
were taken from the national guard armory at Le Mars, la, to the guards' encampment at the Le Mars
County Club.

Pollock Brands
Adolf Hitler
'A Demagogue',
Says Program Is Worst
Wave Of Fanaticism
Since Anabaptists
Prof. James K. Pollock of the polit-
ical science department brandedj
Adolph Hitler, German dictator, "a(
demagogue of the worst school," in
a recent speech and said his Nazi
program is.the worst wave of fanat-'
icism since the Anabaptist outbreak
in the Middle Ages.
In his taik Professor Pollock out-
lined the political, social, spiritual,
?conomic, and foreign relations as-
pects of the Nazi program. Politically
he said that it embraced the idea
of perfect unity of the German states
with one man at its head. Spiritual-
ly, Professor Pollock said it was a
Hitler church, worshipping the four
million sons and fathers that were
killed in the World War.
The economic theory was de-
scribed as one of complete economic
self-sufficiency. Commenting further
Professor Pollock said that he be-
lieves that if Dr. Bruening had re-
tained the chancellorship, the liberal
opinion of all the people in the world
would have conceded justice to him
and the terms he asked.
Professor Pollock termed the social
aspects of the Nazi plan "comical",
describing them as an attempt to
breed a nation of 100 per cent Ger-
mans by employing a eugenic system
whereby only certain people would be
allowed to perpetuate the race.
U.H.S. Will Present
Musical Programs
In celebration of National Music
Week, University High School is pre-.
senting several special musical pro-
grams in the high school auditorium
under the direction of Miss Odina
Olson, teacher of music in the high
school.
The next two programs are as fol-
lows: "The Dizzy Baton," by Car-
rington, 8:30 a. m., Thursday; A
cantata, "Trees," music by Ferris,,
words by Sidney Lanier and Cather-
ine Grimes, 3:30 p. m., Friday.
The students of the seventh grade
and high school have also organized
an elaborate musical display in the
display case on the first floor hall
of the high school, consisting of less
familiar musical instruments, numer-
ous scenes from the operatic works
of Wagner, and a miniature sym-
phony orchestra.

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER
By MASON HALL
"In the spring a young man's fancy
turns to love and-" Co-eds,, as de-
fined by a McGill student are women
who attempt to compete for an edu-
cation with the higher type of hu-
man. The co-ed's right to such a
distinction may be judged by some
of her activities presented herewith.
Wheaton College co-eds cannot
dance, go to shows, or neck, and must
have a prayer before each class.
Neither can they ride with men in
cars at any time-University of Ari-
zona co-eds are now ' paying their
own way when out with men. They
are also entitled to ask the boys for
dates-Purdue University women are
now given the opportunity to attend
a "Charm School" where they learn
such important things as how to hold
a cigarette gracefully, and how to
avoid spilling cocktails on their best
party gowns.
According to a Long Island Uni-
versity professor of psychology, who
conducted an experiment to deter-
mine the scholastic abilities of vari-
ous types of co-eds, blondes ranked
highest in their studies, brunettes
next, and red heads last. This state-
ment refers to natural blondes, not
the synthetic type.
Instead of portraits of beautiful
co-eds, the Ohio Wesleyan annual
this spring will substitute students
distinguished for scholarship and ac-
tivities. Glorifying American co-eds'
brains? ? ?
University of California co-eds are,
in a fashion, generally educated. An
informal survey there revealed the
startling fact that only nine of the
entire co-ed body are unkissed. Of
course, that was last week;
University of Utah men say that
co-eds are uninteresting, unintelli-
gent, and expect nothing but patter
from their dates. Anyway, they be-
lieve all the select women are mort-
gaged before coming to college.,
Observings from here and there-
Irony? According to the Purdue Ex-
ponent, the captain of the Okla-
homa University track team was ar-
rested for hitch-hiking-Students
who fail in a subject at the Uni-
versity of Washington are not per-
mitted to use the library-Six stu-
dents at the University of Denver
were suspended after attending
classes in bathing suits-One of the
duties of the first professor at Ro-
chester University was to chase cows
off the campus.

Two German
Schools Fire
30 Professors
Noted Jewish Specialists
Among Those Dismissed
By Hitler Regime
BERLIN, May 3.-(,)-The open-
ing of the summer semester at Ger-
man schools and universities under
the auspices of the Hitler regime has
been marked by the dismissal of 30
professors from Berlin and Cologne
universities.
Meanwhile the students' federa-
tion of the former institution has in-
augurated a boycott against Jews re-
maining on the staff, contending that
"the German students resent having
the principles of knowledge and
thinking set by Jews."
"It is the duty of every German
student," the federation declared,
"neither to enroll in courses nor to
hear lectures given by Jews."
Dismissal of the 30 professors, 21
from Berlin university and 9 from
the Cologne school, was announced
Tuesday by Bernard Rust, Prussian
education minister.
Among those ousted frem the Ber-
lin institution was the noted cancer
specialist, Ferdinand Blumenthal.
Ferdinand Franz Friedmann, tuber-
culosis specialist; Eugen Mittwoch,
orientalist; Walter Norden, philolo-
gist; Issi Schur, mathematician; and
the Celtic expert, Julius Pokorny, ac-
companied him.
Leo Spitzer, specialist in ancient
Roman law, and Eugen Schmalen-
bach, political economist, fell under
the ban at Cologne university.
Circularizing the Prussian students'
federation incident with the an-
nouncement of the ousting of the
30 professors, Rust asked that the
high reputation of German univer-
sities be maintained under the new
regime.
He admonished the students: "Do
not allow yourselves to be misled by
isolated lapses of professors who fail
to comprehend the signs ofnthe time.
I shall expel both them and students
who cause disturbances."
MAKE GAS MASKS
MILAN, Italy, May 2.--UP)--Fac-
tories here have filed an order for
2,000,000 gas masks to be sold to
the public as a safety measure.
NAME CARDS
r-inted on Finest Linen Cad,
in OLD ENGLISH Type
ro incioze in Commencement
Invitations.
Correctness & Satisfaction Guarantcsa
P1OSTPAiD ONLY 10c a DOZEN
PERRY DAVIS, JR.
Box 263 - Lafayette, Indiana

as now provided, will
aers either on first or
ges upon the whole or
is farm property, real
ncluding crops. The
e mortgage together
.ebtedness cannot ex-
nt of 'the value of the
will a loan of more
be available to any
st will be at the rate
with no payment on
irst three years.
ortgage Holders
n of the loan-aimed
s prevent loss of their
that holders of mort-
liens arrange to the
f the government to
ht to proceed against
roperty because of de-
uid have the effect of
aclosures.
e intended to provide
,1 for farm operations
any farmer to redeem
farm property lost
losure since July 1,
iacists To
Trip To
Itle Creeki

At least 40 students and faculty
members of the College of Pharmacy
will go on the inspection trip to
Battle Creek and Kalamazoo manu-
facturing plants Friday, according'
to Prof. C. H. Stocking of the phar-
macy college.
Finding it inadvisable to charter
a bus as in former, years, the party
will go in faculty and student cars.
The trip will take an entire day,
half a day being spent in each of
the cities.
Production of food preparations
will be studied at the Kellogg plant
in Battle Creek in the morning, Pro-
fessor Stocking said. The group will
have luncheon at the Columbia
Hotel in Kalamazoo and will spendx
the afternoon at the plant of the
Upjohn Compahy there.
While a. Detroit trip, alternately
visiting the Parke-Davis Company
and the Stearns plant, is made every
year, the western trip is offered only
in alternate years. The Detroit trip
this year was made two weeks ago.
The pharmacy school has made
excursions to Chicago in certain
years, as well as to Battle Creek and
Kalamazoo, Professor Stocking said.
In Chicago the Abbott Laboratories,
the Bauer and Black Company, Ar-
mour's Research Laboratories, and
Walgreen Company's -manufacturing
plant were visited.
Librarian Students To
Interview Dr. Bishop
Students desiring to study library
science next fall are now being inter-
viewed by William W. Bishop, libra-
rian,and other members of ther i-
brary science department.
The minimumrequirements for ad-
mission are a good reading knowledge,
of French and German and an honor
point average of one and one-half.
"This procedure is really for the pro-
tection of the student," Mr. Bishop
rcnl'Iainr c .rlaA -

Skay Ride Will
Be Thriller At
World's Fair
Two Towers 625 Feet In
Height Support Cables
For fast Rocket Cars
The supreme amusement thrill of
the Century of Progress Exposition to
be held this summer in Chicago is
the "Sky Ride."
As visitors at. the former world's
fair in 1893 at Chicago returned
home to-tell their friends of the gi-
gantic ferris wheel that astounded
the adventurous souls of - the gay
nineties, so it is expected by fair ex-
ecutives that this modern thrill will
be remembered by 1933 visitors to
Chicago.
The "Sky Ride," which combines
the thrill of an airplane with the
safety of a modem railroad, is an en-
gineering masterpiece that might well
be taken for some scientist's dream
rather than an actual creation. The
engineering ideas involved are taken
from structural methods developed in
steel construction of towers and sus-
pension bridges.
Twin towers, each 625 feet in
height, out-top the Washington Mon-
ument. No building in Chicago ca
equal them in height, and they will
afford a wonderful view of the city.
Three states, Michigan, Illinois, and
Indiana, may be seen from the tower,
as well as a large portion of Lake
Michigan.
The towers are placed 2,000 feet
apart. One is located on the main-
land south of Soldiers Field and the
other on. Northerly Island,,part of
the man-made land on which the ex-
position is being held. Express eleva-
tors will carry passengers to the ob-
servation platforms on the tops of the
towers.
At the 200 foot level, steel cables
are extended between the two towers.
It is on these cables that the rocket
cars which provide transportation be-
tween the two towers will operate.
These cars as well as the cables are
tested to assure safety for the pas-
sengers.
on the front of each car is a pro-
peller, but the actual locofmotion is
provided for by cabies. On the back
stern of the cars are rocket tubes
which emit a colored vapor. A pilot
and individual seats are included in
each car.
The naximum capacity of this mil-
lion dollar attraction of 4,800 persons
per hour. The distance through the
air traveled on a one way trip is 1,-
850 feet. .This exceeds the span of
the Brooklyn Bridge by approximate-
ly 300 feet. Neither the Manhattan
Bridge nor the Williamsburg Bridge
have a span that approaches that
of the "Sky Ride."
JPresident IR thven To
Open Student Parley
(Continied from Page 1)
will be made at the plenary session
tomorrow night to bring all of the
related economic problems together
into a general set of conclusions.
Organizations supporting the con-
ference are the Student Christian
Association, the International Rela-
tions Club, the Council of Religions,
the Michigan Union, the Cosmopoli-
tan Club, the Chinese Students' Club,
the University's International Com-
mittee, the economics department,
the Political' science department, the
sociology department, the journalism
department, and the Oriental lan-
guages department. nd
Faculty men acting in an advisory

By ROBERT HEWETT 1
There are nearly 8,000 different
pipes in the Frieze Memorial Organ1
in Hill Auditorium-Palmer Chris-
tian, University organist, isn't quite
sure of the exact number for he gets
a different total each time he counts;
them.
Square pipes, round pipes, cone-
shaped pipes, in fact practically
every known type of organ pipe is
crowded into the space backstage.
Narrow passages wind their wayt
through a maze of towering, two-
fcot-wide pipes.Narrow ladders lead
up to successive levels where the1
pipes are located in banks and tiersI
until the topmost group, high above
the grating over the stage, is reached.
The 90 pipes that are visible from
the auditorium belonged to the old
organ that was replaced by the Skin-3
ner organ in 1928 and are no longerI
connected with the instrument board.
The largest of the pipes are a
three sets of square wooden columns, I
two feet across and 32 feet high,I
which sound the deepest notes. TheirI
vibration in most cases is felt ratherI
than heard. The "Bombarde" pro-
duces a very loud and "snarly" tone;r
the "Violin" has a definite pitch in
a somewhat "edgy" or string-like
quality; and the "Diapason" (saved
from the old organ) has, in the lower
Dest -Speakers
In Class Of 40'
Will Talk Here
12 Leaders Of Extension
Lecturing Group Give'
Addresses Tonight
Twelve members of an-extension
class in practical public speaking
taught by Prof. G. E. Densmore of
the department of speech and gen-
eral linguistics will come here today
as a part of their class wrk to de-
liver a series of special addresses for
the benefit of the public. They will
convene at 7:45 p. m. in Room 4203
Angell Hall.
These persons, who have been se-
lected as the best speakers in a class
of forty, represent a cosmopolitan
group of business executives and pro-
fessional men. Every one of them is
a college graduate and three of them
are Michigan alumni.
They will each give a four minute
speech; and the program will run one
hour. There will be no admission
charge. The public is invited.
The persons who will speak are
Walter O. Joachim, director of re-
ligious education, St. Mark's M. E.
Church, Detroit; O. Warren Harvey,
lawyer; Roy E. McFee, of the Grand
Trunk Western Railway, who is a Phi
Beta Kappa; Dr. Samuel D. Harris,
dentist, a graduate of the University
of Michigan; Roy C. Goodwin, owner
of the Michigan Magnesia Co., a
University of Michigan graduate;
Norman H. Birnkrant, attorney and
public administor of Wayne County;
Miss Aileen Spafford, interior deco-
ration editor of the Detroit Free
Press; Dr. Harry F. Dibble, physician
and surgeon; William F. Catlin, man-
ager, Ebling Creamery Co.; William
Todd Fray, president of the Gray-
Garfield-Lang Advertising Corpora-
tion; Dr. Bruce C. Lockwood, physi-
cian and surgeon, and a graduate of
the University of Michigan; and
Charles MacCabe Smith, advertising'

Christian's Fingers On Console
Control Tones In 8,000 Pipes

nmql...

%

i

50c
Wilson
Success
GOLF
BALLS
25c

1

ECONOMY PRICES
THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY
AT ALL
ALKINS FLETCHER,
C DRUG ,SOE

U
U
U
U

N EST LE
Chocoiate Bars
15c
Almond or Plain

35c Palmolive
Shaving Cream
19C
Limit One

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pipes, little definition of pitch but
gives the rumble that is felt in many
parts of the building.
Between these two extremes there
aro all sizes and shapes. Some are
flared at the end like a bugle. Others
are conical and suddenly constricted
at the end. Plugs in the end of
some modify the tone. Some give a
"fuzzy" sound, while one actually
"stutters."
The expansion and contraction of
the metals necessitates constant tun-
ing. In the uppermost tier electric
heaters are used at some seasons of
the year to keep a constant tempera-
ture, while a ventilating system is
used to remove stagnant air.
The smallest pipe is one of a group
30 or 40 feet above the stage. It is
no larger than a lead pencil and
emits a faint squeak.
Pipes may be divided into two
main classes-reed and flue. In the
former the tone is produced exactly
like the tone of a clarinet or oboe-
by wind actuating a reed held in the
lower part of the pipe. In flues, the
wind acts as it does in a flute or com-
mon tin whistle. -

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50c
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PENCILS
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50c PEPSODENT ANTISEPTIC

60c AST R I NGOSOL...
75c VAPEX .........
35c STACOMB......

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35c CUTEX REMOVER
25c TESORO CAST I LE.
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$5.40 Folding
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CAMERA
$1098

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75c ACIDINE .
50c RESP I NOL -

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$1.00 Claridge
Playing Cards

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m.rosm. i- M M

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