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May 04, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

N DAILY

_ _ ,

=-

Published every morning except Monday during tn
)niversity year and Summer Session by the Board it
ontrol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa
on, and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively_ entitled to the us(
r republication of all news dispatches credited to it o
ot otherwise credited in this paper and the local new
ublished herein. All rights of republication of specia
ispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, a
con class matter. Special rate of postage granted P3
'ird Assistant Posttlvaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail
150. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; b3
mil, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street
nn Arbor. Michigan. Phone 2-1214.
R~epresentatives: College Publications Representatives
.ic., 46 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 8
oylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue
hicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
'telephone 4925
[ANAGING EDITOR...............FRANK B. GILBUETI
ITY EDITOR...........................KARL SEIFFERI
TORTS EDITOR .................... JOIIN W. THOMAti
VOMEN'SEDITORC..............=MARGARET O'BRI
SSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVED
IGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard
Joseph A. RHenihan, C. hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw
Glenn It. Winters.
PORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman
,EPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Bll, Donald R
Bird, Rchrd B~oeb~el, Arthur W. Cartitenis, Ralpsh G
Coulter, Harold A. Dalheh, .spar S. Early, Waldrot:
Eldridge, Ted Evans. William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel
Thomas Groehn. Robert D. Guthrie. John C. Healev

had been won but equal consideration when
there was a job to be done was not given.
Howcver, President Roosevelt's new- deal has
most decisively included women. Frances Perkins
has been appointed Secretary of Labor, Ruth
Bryan Owen has been made Minister Plenipoten-
tiary, and Nellie Tayloe Ross seems slated for an
administrative position. President Roosevelt's se-
lections have not only opened the way to new
consideration of women for their ability but have
definitely removed the "first woman to hold . . ."
idea which formerly followed the usual run of
appointments of prominent women.
There are two explanations for the President's
attitude. First, he had several under officers while
he was governor of New York who were women
and proved 'capable. Second, in his homelife he
has been associated with women whose abilities
n have taught him to meet them on an equal
ground, neither discounting their ideas or catering
- to their femininty.
It is with the advent of President Roosevelt that
or the ideals of the original suffragettes were at
s last attained. The period in which their votes
were wanted more than their intelligence is past.
G Presidential Pandidates of the future will not make
y the mistake which Hoover did by making special
, pleas to women when rivals are talking to them
on equal grounds with men. There is absolutely
no reason why the country should not benefit by
the experience and abilities of women and now
that they .have won the respect of President
Roosevelt their political futures are assured.

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Screen ReflctiOns
Four stars means exitordinary; three stars veir7 ,
good; two stars good, one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it'.

[i1I'.Karpi11-
qam-icl Lavin,
,%r Mc~eachy,
tum, Floyd
rdsaawr, Rich-

Shapiro, MarshallkD. S1 irmqn. Wilson L..Trimmer,
George Van Vle'ck, Philip Thylor Van Zile, William
Weeks, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Dorothy Adams, Barbara Bates, Marjorie Beck, Eleanor
B. Blum, Frances Carney, Betty Connor, Ellen Jane
Cooley, Margaret Cowie, Adelaide Crowell, Dorothy
Dishman, Gladys M. Draves, Jeanette. Duff, Dorothy'
Gies, Carol J. Hanan, Jean Hanmner, Florence harper,
Marie Heid, Margaret Hiscock, Eleanor Johison; Lois
Jotter, Hilda Laine, Helen Levison, Kathleen MacFntyre,
Josephine McLean, Anna Miller, Mary Morgan, Marjorfe
Morrison, Marie Murphy, Mary M. O'Neill, Margaret D.
Phalan. Jane Schneider, Barbara Sherburne, Mary E.
Sipskon, Ruth Soinanstine, Margaret Spencer, Miriam
1°. Stark, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER................BYRON.C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER.................. HARRY R. B3EGLEPY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......l.Donna C. Becler.
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS Advertising, W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications,' Robert E.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymnson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
AlenW Knmusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Mcigs7 W. Bartmness, Williamv B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas; R. C. Devereaux, Carl -J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John 'P. Ogden, Robert Trinby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff,-George R. Williams.'
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Ginimy, Billie Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
fried, Virginia' McComb; Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Gifen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1933

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AT THE MAJESTIC
A DOUBLEFFEATUREI
"PAYMENT DEFERIbED" with Charles Laughton I
TENSE TRAGEDY
"FACE IN THE SKY" with Lee Tracy
**GOOD COMEDY'
The two shows which the Majestic manage-
went has chosen for this double feature could not
be more different. They are Charles Laughton
in the grim "Paymerlt Deferred" and Lee Tracy
in the story of the traveling sign-painter- 'who
married, the farmer's daughter, "Face in the
Pudgy Charles Laughton is a very fine charac-
ter actor.: He gave a remarkable performance as
Nero. in. "The Sign of" the Cross," but this pie-
ture would be better if there were- a ;little less of
Mr. Laughton. He is very good at registering the
various emotions but ;so much of the picture is
given to his registration that; it. becomes a little.
monotonous before the.end.
The story is a, psychological study of an ordi-
nary citizen who commits a surderto providerthe
necessities for his family. His _wife finds. out
about it ands also finds out that, he has been
misbehaving with a French woman who lives
around the corner. She commits suicide and he!
is blamed for her murder so that, while payment
for the original murder was. deferrecl, it eventually
is -demanded.
While. during the course of this picture Laugh-
ton has to. attain most of. the degrees of. most
of the emotions andhe only has-one face to do
it- with, it does seem that he could have looked a
little less nunfb at some of, the points in the
picture. He is Charles Laughton .throughout the
show and no one else.
"Face in the Sky" on the other hand, is a com-
ical picture pf the man who rpaints the signs on
Karns, Lee Tracy, and his pal, Stuart Erwin. Tracy
has big designs for his life-he is going to marry
a girl with lots -of culture whose father owns a
railroad-until he arrives, at a farm where the
brutal father and son are planning to make the
beautiful ward ,marry the son. ,His protective in-
stincts aroused, he steps to her aid and finally
takes her off with him when they leave the farm-
precipitately.
The farmer catches them, however, and takes
the girl back to the. farm to marry the cloddish
son while Tracy goes on to New York. She escapes
and comes on to the big city where she finds
him at just the proper moment.
It's a funny show and the authors have invented
quite a few new gags.
Artistically "Payment Deferred" is the better of
the two shows, but "Face in the Sky" is the more
fun to watch. -B. S.
The Theatre

parts in "Journey's End" require the use of Eng-
lish-English, that is, as it is spoken in England.
Whereas the entire cast rendered the language
with more or less success, Mr. Pribil, with a part
of not more than a dozen speeches. stood out
clearly and sharply for the charm and smooth-
ness with which he read his lines. That is,
he stood out from everyone but Mr. Crandall, but
then we suspect that Mr. Crandall learned Eng-
lish where English is spoken.
r
Editorial Comment 1
'EDUCATION CONSCIOUS ALUMNI'
The tune is changing from yarns about college
graduates suffering less than others from unem-
ployment, to the admission that this is the most
seriously affected group in the country. Some
fragmentary figures report that there are at least
75,000 unemployed school teachers in the country
and that in New York City alone there are more
than 5,000 unemployed engineers and 1,500 jobless
journalists. The American Library association
admits that there are 14 unemployed librarians
to every one employed.
While Congress concerns itself with banks, rail-
roads, war veterans, farmers and others who re-
quire aid, not one legislative proposal has yet
been brought forward in an attempt to cope with
the problems which have overwhelmed a large part
of the current generation of college alumni.
The only effort at organization is the Associa-
tion of Unemployed College Alumni which recently
came into being at New York City. This group is
swinging into action with an assembly which was
held May 2 and 3 in Washington to discuss a leg-
islative program ad to call the attention of
Congress to the situation.
Heretofore, while other groups were organizing
to compel national attention to their situation,
college and professional people have remained
aloof, each individual trying to work out his own
salvation. If any individuals in the country are
capable of working ''for a program designed to
eininate ;the causes of, unemployment," it cer-
tainly would be those citizens who have had the
advantage of college training.
.-Minnesota Daily.
Musial Eents
DALIES FRANTZ-;
The significance of Dalies Frantz lies in the
fact that he is no longer a brilliant pianist. Bril-
liance, is a shiny surface luster that is applied
from the outside like varnish. Mr. Frantz has
outgrown it along with all the other attributes
of the performer. A creative ability like his needs
no Christmpas tree ornaments. He has passed be-
yond the limits of his instrument, beyond the
edges of his medium, into the infinity of art itself.
His playing has gained a perspective-it has both
a foreground and a background-and the strong
black and white lines that characterized his in-
terpretations have been merged and extended
into a broad outline that includes the whole of
life within its sweep. Great art necessitates great
people behind it. We are too close to view him in
proportion but in the mildest of terms, he has a
great talent, and to the enthusiast, he has genius.
We have had pianists who tossed their long
hair over the keyboard-we have unbelievably
perfect performers whose calm is almost unearth-
ly-but the simplicity with which he played is
unique. The quiet strength of his Bach-the warm
beauty of the Brahms E major Intermezzo-and
the control of his Chopin, while consistent with
the traditional performances, had a vitality that
was his own. His is no sterile Christian art. The
thump of skin stretched tom-toms and the brassy
beat of cymbals sounded behind the primitive sav-
agery of the Prokofieff and the De Falla dances
and the dry gray humor of the Poulenc Perpetual
Motion had a laugh like a gargoyle's grin. Please
Heaven may he never become bored and sophis-
ticated!
-Kathleen Murphy.
STARS

- & STRIPES
By Karl Seiffert

__-

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100 CARDS from your plate ................ .$1.50
100 CARDS (Process Engraving) .............. $1.75
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Childrens' Permonents
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$1.00
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MICHIGAN

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Peaceful May Pay Marks
Decline Of Agitators.
C OMMUNISM used to be a horrida
word in the United States, but 'r
somehow less is heard lately of the radicals who 1
jump up on street corners and shout, "Down with 1
everything."s
For, whether the intelligent communists like it I
or not, the movement in America has -come to be 1
associated with .senseless anarchy. The I. W. W.
and other similar groups have become character-t
ized as the type of anti-social groups who seeks
to destroy without any very good cause.a
Monday was May Day-the traditional day on
which the radicals got together in the past and
marched to the town hall to throw bricks throughc
the mayor's window. But Monday there were
no serious riots in any part of the country and int
Detroit, which, with its many large factories, is,;f
usually a center of radical activity, a large groupv
of workingmen quietly gathered in Grand Circus
Park, listened peaceably to a number of speeches
by socialist and communist leaders, and as quiet-
ly dispersed.
The people of the United States, even the labor-
ers, are. growing intolerant of the nihilists. An ex-,
cellent example is provided by the Briggs
body strike last winter when the leaders of the
strike became indignant at finding some com-
munists anong the striking workmen. Another
inztance was provided by the action of the B.E.F
last year -when red agitators were thrown out of
the camp by the sincere members of the "army."-
The Detroit Leader,a- a newspaper founded last
fall in. Detroit under ostensibly socialistic aims
and which eyen has had signed stories by Norman
Thomas but which devoted most of its space to
diatribes against every manifestation of the exist-
ing system, has recently. suspended publication.
This is unquestionably another evidence of the
declining interest of the public in the policies
of the more violent reds.
Socialism is a much less horrid word than com-
munism and the principles -for which, the so-
cialists stand are beginning to find a new favor in
American eyes. Their policy of peacably going
about their own business and quietly ,altering the
business of government from the top rather than
overturnng everything and beginning over is more
popular.
The socialists who follow in the steps of Nor-
man Thomas are taking over the territory former-+
ly occupied by the communists and their' program
of peaceful reform is maore likely to succeed than
the red program of anti-everything.
The P-pde nmt

ARILYN'S SEMI-ANNUAL
COATS AND SUITS

"JOU1RNEY'S END, ---- ---- -
ATJ THE LABOATO~RY
By GEORGE SPELVIN
It is almost impossle. to -tinate a student;
dramatic production without tacitly admitting the
undeniable fact tliat anatcurs do not act lik
professionals. Last night in Laboratory Theatre .it
was at times hard to-realize that Play -Produc-
bion's "Journcy's- End" company was, composed
entirely of students., Theie: were m ments, par-
ticularly during the best scenes of Frederick Cran-
dall and Edward .PQzz, when the dialogue :and
action were definitely transported out of the field
of merely remarkable student dramatics to a plane
that would. make them .acceptable as .fine acting
anywhere.
In light of his excellent work in "Hay Fever"
earlier in the season, Mr. Crandalls performance
as Lieutenant Osborne last- night proves him a
capital actor and one., who has already achieved
an astonishing ability to play parts with brilliance
that call for the maturity of middle age, and
its dignity, poise, and self-assurance.
As Captain Stanhope, the 21-year-old com-
mander of a front-lie company, Mr. Pozz, aided
and abetted by his striking appearance, played
the part as though it. had 1geen writte.n for him.
Both in the high emotional scenes and in the more
restrained moments his work was consistently and
satisfyingly convincing. He was always powerful;
his interpretation of the part brought to the audi-
ence the complete conviction of prematurely aged
youth fighting :despair- and horror. -

Detroit's Mayor Murphy is likely to roturn from
his new job as governor-general of the Philip-
pines soon in search of a seat in the Senate, ac-
cording to a writer. Of course there's -always
the chance that he'll find himself just a political
strap-hangcr. - -
. .* * *
GANMIll STALRT'iS
PIQTIST. F4A3T
-Headline
That's the stuff; get in there quick.
'j * -'-
CLASSIFIED AD: Get rid of your bedbugs with
perfect bug. illei, sstainless; mney-back guar-
antee.
Now lissen here-they're our bedbugs and we'll
do what we, want with them.
.... * * *
SINISTER THREAT DEPT.
"Deliberate absence from the Cat s Meouw con-
ference is- a mistake that cannot be rectified,"
declared the cunning Cat last night as she checked
over the list of those who had not yet answered
her summons.-Purdue Exponent.
Trying to make a farce out of this thing, eh?
* * *
Few of the present generation are aware that
Boston, Mass.. was -once the capital of New Jer-
sey.-News Item.
Fewer care.
* * *
GEN. CUSTER'S OLD SCOUT,
BEAR'S .BELLY, DIES AT 78
-Headline
Musta caught cold, huh?

. P
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WE MAKE THESE
SENSAT I ONAL
OFFER I NGS
NOW!'

There are months
of Wear in these
COATS AND SUITS

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C HOICE OF
56 COA TS
(UNTRIMMED)

CHOICE OF
26 SUITS

$3.80
C'.. eC

~3,80

. 4i19? 4 '

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