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May 03, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-05-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AN DAILY

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1. 6TOP ?0RD CQ7 0 JU T3 N (ATkfU' U TrNJ^Y~nC N 1 Wf AM~r.w rM.
Published every morning except' Monday during the
-niversity year and Summer Session by the Board in
ontrol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
on and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
or republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
iot otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
aiblished herein. All rights of republication of special
ispatches are reserved.
Entered .at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
Peond class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
bird Assistant Postn'aster-rxeneral.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
.5. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00;by
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard street,
Lnu Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
yt. 40 East Thirty-Fourth1Street, New York City; 80
loylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
hicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
[ANAGING EDITOR...... ...FRANK B. GILBRETH
TYEDTOR....... .......KARL SEIHPERT
POTSEI2O......... . 4.. OHN W. THOMEAS
VOMEN'S EDITOR............. ..MARGARET O'BRIEN
SSISTANT .WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
TIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joselh A. 'Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
PORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert. Newman.I
EPORTEIRS rCharles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Donald R.
Bird, Richard Boebel, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G.
Coulter, Harold A. Daisher, Caspar S. Early, Waldron
Eldridge, Ted Evans, William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel,
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Robert B. Hewett, George M. Holmes, Joseph L. Karpin-
ski, Milton Keiner, Matthew Lefkowitz, Manuel Levin,
Irving Levitt, David G. MacDonald, Proctor McGeachy,
Sidney Moyer, Joel P. Newman, John O'Connell,Ken-
neth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George Quimby, Floyd
Rabe, William Reed, Edwin W. Richardson, Rich-
ard Rome, H. A. Sanders, Robert E. Scott, Adolph
Shapiro, Marshall D. Silverman, Wilson L. Trimmer,
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Weeks, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Dorothy Adams, Barbara Bates, Marjorie Beck, Eleanor
B. Blum, Frances Carney, Betty Connor, Ellen Jane
Cooley, Margaret Cowie, Adelaide Crowell, Dorothy
Dishman., Gladys M. Draves, Jeanette Duff, Dorothy
Gies, Carol J. Hanan, Jean Hantert lorence Harper.
Marie Held, Margaret Hiscock, Eleanor Johnson, Lois
Jotter, Hilda Laine, Helen Levison, Kathleen MaIntyre,
Josephine McLean, Anna Miller, Mary Morgan, Marjorie
Morrison, Marie Murphy, Mary M. O'Neill, Margaret D.
Phalan. Jane Schneider, Barbara Sherburne, Mary E.
Simpson, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret Spencer, Miriam
P. Stark, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
USINESS MANAGER..........BYRON C. VBDDE
'REDI' MANAGER...... .........HARRY R. BEGLEY
OMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......Donna C. Becker
EPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, W. Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
SSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess, Willian? B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory. Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby,' Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb, Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.

running back to Granny Europe for a kind word,
I wish that someone of Bennett's authority would
say that Angna Enters dances like an angel; it
would be meaningless and inaccurate, but it would
focus attention on an amazing American artist
who, for seven or eight years, has given to an
ever increasing number of people a rare and ex-
ceptional pleasure.
Miss Enters does not lack appreciation either
here or abroad. In Paris and London her appear-
ances are tumultuously received, but critics of the
highest standing look for the final word in judi-
cious praise. For all that, her American admirers
are distinguished enough. All that is lacking is a
final impressive word which will indicate to the
world at large that Angna Enters is one of the
few people whose work is really exciting, enter-
taining in every sense, and not to be passed by.
If that word would, by happy chance, include
a brief and accurate name for what she does, it
would be a blessing. She is a dancer, yet she does
not always dance; she is an actress, but she
speaks no words; she is, almost incidentally, a
comedian, beside whom Fannie Brice and Bea-
trice Lillie are mere beginners.
I know of no artist who is so simple. She
comes out on a bare stage, in front of some black
curtains, dressed like a Viennese young lady of
70 years ago, and in the arms of an imaginary
partner, goes through a Strauss waltz, carrying on
in the most fragmentary way, a flirtation with an-
other, probably more agreeable, an also invisible
dancer; it would be a parlour stunt if it weren't so
full. of life, and so exquisite.
Or she sits, .a girl of . 15, practising Fur Elise
at the piano, knowing that her mother is listening
-and reading a sentimental novel at the same
time; or she is a French demi-mondaine of the
1890's, kept waiting at a rendezvous; or another
American girl going through the agonies of field
sports, while mosquitoes bite, and the sun blazes,
and strangers are aware of her awkwardness.
She has another series, where her comic gift is
put away, and something profound and tender
takes its place. She sits on a throne as the
Queen of Heaven, with a rose in her hand, a com-
plete incarnation of the medieval idea of the
Mother of Jesus; she follows this with Odalisque.
the essence of Oriental voluptuousness; and this'
may be followed by another of her sinister crea-
tions: a prelude to dementia praecox (a girl, a
mirror, and a movie magazine with a photograph
of the girl's favorite actress which she aspires to
resemble). Or she will dance a stately pavane,
like a Borgia meditating murder; or she will inl10
minutes give a thrilling satiric summary of all the
dances of America in the past 20 years.
She is a critic and a wit, but above all she is a
creator; you see things taking form and flesh and
color as she moves. That is, of course, the great-
est pleasure an artist can give you, and Miss En-
ters is, by herself, a school for all the actors,
tragic and comic, of our stage and screen. I doubt
whether more than two or three of them can spare
the lessons she could teach; I am pretty sure
none of them surpass her.

classicism of the eighteenth century has been re-
placed with a romantic simplicity that merges the
characteristics of the preceding centuries into an
idiom of our own. The Bach Prelude and Fugue.
which have been said to be "so mighty in design
and to have so much of harshness blended with
their power, that the hearer can only grasp them
after several hearings," contrasts almost a4
strongly with the set of dances which makes up
Handel's "Water Music" Suite, as the beautifully
sensuous "Tristan" selections differ from the quiet
mysticism of the Frank Chorale.
-Kathleen Murphy
DALIES FRANTZ-
Tonight will mark the first Ann Arbor appear-
ance of Dalies Frantz, young American pianist,
since he was heard as soloist with the Detroit
Symphony last fall. Mr. Frantz has just returned
from a highly successful tour of the East where,
among other recital engagements, he played in
the homes of Mrs. Lowell Cabot and Prof. Kings-
ley Porter of Harvard University.
He was to have been assisted this evening by
Joseph Brinkman, in the second piano part of
the Beethoven Concerto in C major, but owing to
an unfortunate accident Mr. Brinkman will be
unable to play. The program of necessity has been
changed and follows in its entirety as it will be
played tonight:
Prelude and Fugue in F minor ............ Bach
Lament
Two Choral Preludes
Gigue
Prelude, Chorale and Fugue ............. Franck
Papillons...........................Schumann
Intermezzo ............................ Brahms
Fugue
Two Etudes ............................ Chopin
Suggestion Diabolique . ............... Prokofieff
Perpetual Motion .......................Poulenc
Country Gardens ..................... Grainger
Ritual Fire Dance ..................... De Falla
EMIL STEVA-
Music, in one form or another, is all too often
the cause of a great deal of nervousness. But, con-
versely, it is the same nervousness that makes the
music. What Mr. Steva played last night, he did
nicely. And as he gradually forgot himself in
his program, he began to play very well. Mr. Steva
was undoubtedly nervous-yet it is through this
same sensitiveness that he derives the quality that
gives him a consistently pleasant tone, a good deal
of real feeling, and considerable poetic imagina-
-tion. Mr. Steva plays Liszt quite differently than
he does Beethoven-which is rather more rare
than one might expect. And the fact that of all
the qualities that make up a musician, experience
is the easiest to get should be very cheering to
the young pianist.
-Kathleen Murphy

TELEPHONE HOME

1.

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Big Rapids.......
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(On calls costing 5Oc or more,
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STARS

k 8
I

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 1933
Bewhiskered Barnacles
On The Faculty . .
STATE LEGISLATOR Vernon J.
Brown, prominent State journalist, I
has written an article declaring that the Uni-
versity of Michigan will not be seriously affected
by the proposed cut in the revenue received from
Lansing.
Mr. Brown says the pending mill-tax reduc-
tion will not force mediocrity on the University.
He also implies that the cultural atmosphere of
the campus will not be threatened by the de-
creased amount of revenue.
However, President Alexander Grant Ruthven,
who is certainly in closer touch with the situa-
tion than any other person, has declared that a
large cut in the Lansing appropriation will bring
the University down "from a first-class institution
to a third-class" one.
Mr. Brown also maintains that there is not
a single salary in the -higher levels of the Uni-
versity payroll that cannot stand a drastic re-
duction.
-Again we quote Dr. Ruthven, who has said that
all employees of the University are paid on a
"market value" basis and any reductions below
this value would in many cases cause the profes-
sors to resign from the faculty. .
There can be little doubt that Dr. Ruthven is
the better authority on the situation. That he is
sincere in his convictions cannot be doubted.
Consequently, we are inclined to believe that Mr.
Brown, who is also sincere in his convictions, is
misinformed.
One reform that the Legislator advocates is the
elimination of "bewhiskered barnacles from pro-
fessiorial berths." While it is difficult to define the
term "barnacles" as used by Mr. Brown, we believe
that, regardless of the intended connotation, the
University's standing today can be directly attrib-
uted to the older men on its faculty. Many so
called "bewhiskered barnacles" have had (and are
having) offers from other institutions. Their loss
to Michigan would be a serious one. It would help
Michigan down the grade to a "third-class" in-
stitution.
The Theatre

ON "JOURNEY'S END"
By DAVID MOTT
There is something dangerous in writing a
tragedy about events within the memory of the
spectators. It is significant that Shakespeare,
who hymned the exploits of Henry V, wrote no
play about the defeat of the Armada, that Abra-
ham Lincoln appeared but fleetingly in plays until
he entered as a full-length character in Jahn
Drinkwater's drama, half a century after his as-
sination. If an audience sees a re-enactment of
the things they are reading in the daily news-
papers, we find them saying-"We know these
things all along. What does the author add to the
dreary recital?" The reason for this is that the
audience is too shaken by the events themselves to
be in a mood to contemplate them with the ob-
jectiveness art demands. The author himself is too
involved in thoughts and feelings to attain that
delicate balance between emotion and self-crit-
icism. Life is only dramatic in perspective.
When R. C. Sherriff, nearly 10 years after the
Armistice, sat down to write a play about the.
Great War for the amateurs of his boat club, it
was with recollective emotions, clear and unmixed.
The script of his play, "Journey's End," shows a
complete absence of strain. In the 10 years, he
had forgotten a good deal of the physical and
moral filth of the war. Writing his memories, he
must have been quite unconscious of giving the
world anything like a message. But his memories
were not like those of any of the "My Maryland"
type of war plays, he had developed a tougher
point of view. It is the point of view of the great
majority of Englishmen who served with him:
"It's a filthy business, but if a chap's got to do it,
he's got to do it." Not modesty but emotional
honesty prevented him from seeking cheap con-
solation in glory speeches and routine about Eng-
lishmen's honor and playing the Game.
Thespoint of view, a cynical attitude toward
War, is not distinctive in Sheriff's play; indeed,
no recent War play or novel has had any other
theme. The distinctiveness in this, above other
war plays, is in Sherriff's treatment of character.
That is what happened during the 10 years. Sher-
riff was able after 10 years to look beyond the
event and its immediate emotion right into the
souls of men. Ten years before, the object would
have aroused him so he wouldn't have seen them
at all. There is no bitterness in "Journey's End."
When you see it you are only conscious of the war
as some kind of abstract force. Your whole at-
tention is on the characters presented by this
force.
Few war plays have attained the absence of
strain found in "Journey's End." "What Price
Glory?" in 1924 was a little too near the event,
and got its best effects by nose-thumbing the
event. That is the only alternative, if you can't
treat a topic seriously. Stallings and Anderson
didn't interpret as exactly as Sherriff. Sherriff
has been played around the world, in over 30
different languages.

= & STRIP ES
SPRING THOUGHTS ON THE GARDEN
IN MIDSUMMER-A FOREBODING
Oh, where are the turnips,
The parsnips and chard
I planted last April
In rows in the yard?
Oh, where in that patch
I so faithfully hoed
Are the vegetable glories
The seed packets showed?
The little green sprouts
Which I welcomed are dead,
Leaving withered old stalks
And dry leaves in their stead.
The lettuce is sickly,
The spinach looks frail,
And I can't FIND the place
Where I planted the kale!
-The Drs. Whoofle.
* * *
TWO DRUNKEN
DRIVERS GIVEN
SEVERE JOLTS
-Headline
They'll never snap out of it that way.
NINE-WORD TRAGEDY
CLASSIFIED AD: Will swap good Chevrolet six
coupe for law books.
Congress is in a stew because some of the mem-
bers have be'en smoking on the floor of the House.
Back a few years ago nobody took particular
notice when Senators Borah and Norris broke
right out into flames now and then.
* * *
The Chicago man who bought two marriage
licenses with only one wife lined up seems to be
about the same kind of optimist as the guy who
wears both suspenders and a belt.
ORIGINAL UNCLE SAM'S
DAUGHTER DIES POOR
Headline
Right now it looks as if the old man might
recover.

MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO.

They'll be well taken
care of ... and Mich-
igan Daily Classifieds
do get results . . . at
a very small cost.

maiI&

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(T'M Awflly
Sorry Buto--
I'm dated up for the rest of the
semester." - A consideration of
the current dating problem on
the campus as seen by one who
has suffered. To him life is just
"a dish of soggy rice pudding
from which someone else has ex-
tracted the raisins." Feel the seri-
ousness of the problem with
GARGOYLE in the May issue.

GARGOYLE

* * *
FOWL
"When I called to him," she related, "he
ran right over to the fence and began follow-
ing me along it. Now, I've had that chicken
so long that I can talk to him and he under-
stands what I say. And he can talk back."
"Aw, Your Honor," Dandoy protested,
"those chickens would go to anyone who
called them. I feed them wet-mash to make
them lay. They don't like mash, so they're
hungry all the time. They'd come to anyone
who e aed them. They're my chickens."

On Sale Today

-ii.--

LIKE AN ANGEL
By GILBERT SELDES
Note: The following article by the distinguished
critic, Mr. Seldes. appeared in the Friday, April 16,
issue of The New York Evening Journal, following
Miss Enters' recent recital at the Guild Theatr
I-rVrr isr- n. ,i.ntod y s ewiai nrmission of

Musical Event's

Featuring:
Preposterous People No. 6
"Believe Them or Not" by Robert Henderson
Metamorphosis of Binny

..A

AMS

II

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