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April 29, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iN DAILY

--=L1 ,
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' I

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year an Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications-
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all newsdispa tchescredited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-.General-
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mall,
$I.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Miehigan. Phone 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Repr'esentatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North :Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITOLIAL STAFF
Telephonc 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETH.
CITY EDITOR............................KARL SEIFFERT
SPOR'TS EDITOR ....................JO9HN W. THOM~AS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SIORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Bal, Donald R.
Pird, Richard Boebel, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G.
Coulter, Harold A..Daisher, Caspar S. Early, Waldron
Eldridge, Ted Evans, William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel,
Thomas Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, John C. Healey,
,Robert B. Hewett, George M~. Holm~es, Joseph L. Karpin-,
ski, Milton Keiner, Matthew Lefkowitz, Manuel Levin,
Irving yevitt, David G. MacDonald, Proctor MeGeachy,
Sidney Moyer, Joel P. Newman~, John O'Connell, Ken-
neth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George sQinaby, Floyd
Rabe, William Reed. Edwin W. Riebardson, Rich-
ard Rome, H. A. Sanders, Robert E. Scott, Adolph
Shapiro, Marshall D. Sit-verman, Wilson L. Trimmenr,'.
George VaA Vleck, Philip Taylor Van Zile, William
Weeks, Guy M. ,Whipple, Jr.,
Dorothy Adams, Barbara Bates. Marjorie Beck, Eleanor
B. Blui, Frances Carney, Betty Connor, Ellen Jane
Cooley, Margar'et Cowie, Adelaide Crowell, Dorothy
Dishman, Gladys M. Draves, Jeanett e uff, Dorothy
Gies, Carol .. anan, Jean Hanimer, P.lorence Harper,
Marie iead, Margaret Hiscock, Eleanor Johnson, Lois
Jotter, Hilda Laine, Helen Levison, Kathleen MacIntyre,
Josephinec McLean. Anna Miller, Mary Morgan, Marjoriej
Morrison, Marie Murphy, Mary M. O'Neill, Margaret D.
┬░halan, Jane Schneider, Barbara Sherburne, Mary E.
Sinmpson, R11 rSonnanstine, Margaret Spencer, Miriam
1'. Stark, Marjorie Western.
BUSINESS STAFF'
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER ......... .HARRY R.,-BGLEYE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......onna C. Becker
DEPARTMENTAMANAGERS: Ad vertising, W, Graf ton Sharpt
Avertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts. Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
ASSIS'TANTS: John Becllaamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroy mon, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume.
Allen Knuusi. Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess, Williaw B..Caplan, Willard;
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux, Carl J. Fibiger, Albert
Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
John P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Berna d Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams. t
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, DorisI
(iminy, Billie Griftiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-C
fied, Virginia McComnb, Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, M nna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1933t
A DesirableS
New 'Tradition'. .i

his misplaced passion for self-improvement, his
naive delight in learning the obvious, his respect
for mental acquirements and or'namental accom-
plishments. M. Jourdain is a snob who would
rise above his appointed station, but not a bad
fellow. lie has- flashes of self-judgment and is
not without an occasional shrewd insight into his
own excesses. He certainly undervalues his more
solid qualities, his very real plain citizen's virtues,
in order to follow after vain things.
In the Thursday night revival of Le Bourgeois
Gentilhonmme, the title role was played by Harry
Skornia with a disarming naivete which suffi-
ciently compensated for the lack of a more fin-
ished acting technique. Edward Campbell as the
Count Dorante offered a performance distin-
guished both in tonal variety and in grasp of the
art of significant gesture. John Maulbetsch, as
Cleonte, was properly lyrical and impressing with
his agreeable voice and dignified presence. James
O'Neill, as Covielle, gave his usual competent in-
terpretation of a farce character part, a rendering
marked by considerable subtlety in voice and busi-
ness. Of the lesser male figures, Joseph La Cava
deserves most praise for his admirable diction and
for the dry humor he brought to the part of the
Master of Philosophy. Maurice Demers, as the
Fencing Master, was vigorous in word and deed.
John Schmidt, as the Music Master, is to be com-
mended for good diction, though as an actor his
individualization flickered. Harold Barnes gained
sufficiently in ease as the play advanced so that
one wished that all his performance had been on
the level of his better moments. John Seaman
was 'a' personable and 'adequate Master Tailor.
Alfred Koch, Robert Hawley and Riccardo Rami-
rez served acceptably in their unimportant roles.
More authentic costumes, i several cases, would
have improved the stage picture appreciably, and
in particular better wigs -for nearly all (A few' of
the Imen's wigs' were really 'too bad!) would have
aided in creating period atmosphere. Alas, these
things 'cost money and the men, even though
some of their "lights" were too much hidden under
thes'e "bushels," did create successfully the effect
of gayfarcical impr'ovisation; the effect inost to
be -desired, *ithut expensive accessories.
Ruth Karpinski carrikd off the female honors
as Mme.' Jourdain. She was an arresting and ag-i
gressive figure - at all times, and her variety of
votal inflection was as striking as her dominant
stage presence. Norma Cove, as Lucile, and Betty
Bergener, as 'the Marquise Dorimene, were both
distinctly decorative on the sta'ge 'and gave sym-
'iathetic interpretations of their well contrasted
roles. Edith Carlin, as Nicole, was more successful
in her amusing opening scene than in the later
Yornahti&' episodes' with Covielle. The women's
costumes were'picturesque and reasonably'sugges-I
tive of the period.
The "comedie-ballet," a genre of which Moliere
cofiposed twelve' fo Louis. XIV's' royal'pleasure,
descends' directly from the "wallet de' cour" It re-
'mained for Moliere t& 'endow this mixed genre
with literary merit.' He makes M. Jourdain's folly
assume at moments k'ropartions of such absurdity
that the extravagance of "the interludes of song
and d'ance des not' seem too inappropriately
fantastic. The Turkish cerenony is one of the
gayest and most light-hearted products of Mo-1
liere's imagination. This Turkish-scene furnished'
the high point of last night's' performance, the1
most colorful stage picture and the most uproari-
ous fun. One must mention, while speaking of
the interludes, Professor Charles Philip Wag-
ner's pleasing arrangement of Lulli's music for
the overture, ballets, and songs, the performance'
of which he graciously directed. Charles Ruegnitz
sang one of these songs quite acceptably while
Helen VanLoon interpreted the other most charm-
ingly.

Campus Opinon
Letters publi;ihed in this column should iiot be
conmtrued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of comniunicants will, however, be re-
garded as. corlicientlal upon request. Conltributors are
asked to be brief, confining theseives to less than
300 words if possible.

While Pri cs Are Low
PHONE 2-2113 FOR PAR TICULARS

PROFESSORS' PRESUMPTION
IN COMMENDING SAMUEL SEABURY
"By authority of the State of Michigan, vested
in the Board of Regents and delegated by them
to me, I hereby confer upon you the degree of
Dcctor of Laws entitling you to all the honors
and privileges incident thereto." With these words
the President of our University magnanimously
presented Samuel Seabury with the scroll which
will forever constitute documentary proof of his
accomplishments and his contributions to society.
Of course no one in this enlightened age would
think of regarding Mr. Seabury's exposure of cor-
ruption in municipal government an adequate
tribute in itself-his accomplishments should have
official sanction by a University faculty, whose
principal contact with the affairs of the world
consists in harrowing youthful students through
four years of university life.
As opposed to the Daily's editorial opinion con-
cerning the students' behavior in leaving last Fri-
day morning's Convocation before the exercises
were completed, the student body as a ,whole de-
serves a great deal of commendation for good be-
havior. Undoubtedly great will power was exer-
cised in restraining the mirth which must cer-j
tainly have been provoked by the mock splendor
of the colorful pageant which the faculty pre-
sented, disguised as they were, in somber black
priests' robes which set off the brilliant greens,
reds, and golds to such good advantage and lent
an air of dignity to the wearer.
It will no doubt always be a great source of sat-
isfaction to those faculty members who were pres-
ent in full regalia and consented to be official
witnesses to Mr. Seabury's promotion. It was
highly commendable of this august body to admit
Mr. Seabury to the inner circle of the learned,
and to confer upon him "all the privileges and
honors which the faculty presumed to confer upon
Mr. Seabury, and which the latter so graciously
accepted. What significance could they possibly
have to a man whose accomplishment in the world
of actuality has become a criterion of achieve-
ment in public service? This contrasted with the
sham of the scholastic gesture impresses one
forcefully with the incongruity of the entire situa-
tion.
How much more fitting would it not have been
for this man of achievement to offer practical
suggestions and encouragement to a struggling
faculty, rather than to receive commendation
from them on the work which they may or may
not be competent to evaluate. What a legacy
these pedagogues would receive were Mr. Seabury
to instruct them in the ways of living and doing
in the outer world-the real world! To what
lengths might these scholars not go were their
erudite minds augmented with a modicum of
knowledge about those things which are actually
encountered by living. With these things accom-
plished under Mr. Seabury's competent tutelage,
the scholars, denuded of - dignified robes and
blazing colors, could rejoice in the simple but
deeply significant procedure of receiving com-
mendation, and perhaps some little token of 'ac-
complishment, from Mr. Seabury.
Perhaps our educational system will sometime
awaken to find that the pedestal upon which it
has placed itself has removed it from the bene-
ficial contact with life. And with its first rever-
sion to consciousness it will no doubt purge itself
of the wealth of fal-de-ral, tradition, and sham
with which it is now so gloriously surfeited.
-Iconoclast.

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Have Youre Deereng
Done NOW

112 West Washngton

Sm r oFor Comfort,
StyleanSaey
Bring your Winter Furs to 'werdling's Fur Shop
for Storage and walk out with a Spring Jacquette
or Neckpiece. Largest selection, Greatest Values
in our 29 years here. Prices are sure to advance.
1933 JACQUETTES $19.75 Up.
NECKWEAR x$4.95 Up.
LOW SUMMER PRICES
FUR REPAIRING AND CLEANING
In addition to the safety of your Furs while in our
possession, we'll Restyle, Repair and Clean them
(if you wish) at "LOW SUMMERRATES"
and you can be assured of having your furs ready
for the first cold snap in the fall,

I
f
i
i
r
I
I
I
I
E
1
f

Know that
Yot l.

TELEPHON E

.

I

AL.

the

Ad -Taker

at

2-1214

ESTABLISHED 1904 217 E. UBES:
9 YFURe asadS c
29 Years of Unexcelled Values aand Service

They'll be well taken
care of... and Mich-
igan Daily Classifieds
do get results ..at

A

a very small cost.

T HE FAMILY BANQUET, an inno-;
vation which will replace the old;
Father and Son banquet, may be regarded as an
intelligent move to make of Spring Homecom-
ing a more enjoyable event to all. The new ban-
quet will effectively remove the old disunion which+
resulted from the separation of members of the
family at a time when it was most desirable that
they should be together. The Mother and Daugh-
ter Luncheon has, of course, been consolidated+
with the new banquet.
With the Family Banquet prominent, the gen-t
eral committee's ambition to make the 1933 Springa
Homecoming the forerunner of a "tradition ofy
traditions may be effectively realized, although
the business of "creating" a tradition is neces-
sarily hard. It must be remembered that Spring
Homecoming is one of the enlightened traditions
of this campus, and the criticism which may be+
levied against the saving of certain other "tradi-
tions" does not apply here. The Family Budget
and Homecoming are deserving of your support.
The banquet will vie for your favor with inter-.1
collegiate games, exhibits, building inspections,
Lantern Night and many other diversions, The
Homecoming period will also mark the figurative
trial by jury of Cap Night and the spring games.
These last two events, if a sufficient interest is
shown by homecomers and students, will be con-
tinued. If the continued lag in interest is pro-
nounced, they may be abandoned next year.
Spring Homecoming this May 12, 13 and 14 will
prove three most enjoyable days for you and your
parnts if you take full advantage of the program
offered. A "tradition of traditions" needs your
co-operation.
The Thatr
LE BOURGEOIS GENTILHOMME
-A REVIEW
The Cercle Francais, under the able and devoted
direction of Professor Rene Talamon, gave as its
annual production, Thursday night in the Mimes;
Theatre, 'before an audience of students and
others interested in drama, Moliere's amusing
"comedie-ballet," Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme.
The "premiere" performance of this well-known
play occurred on the fourteenth of October, 1670.
Posterity has endorsed the Sun King's gracious
verdict on the piece-"Truly you have written
Nothing that has amused me more, and your play
is excellent." The monarch had himself com-

Thursday night's successful performance was
sincerely and warmly appreciated by a capacity
audience.
-Warner F. Patterson.

COMPLETE DRAMATIC
FESTIVAL PROGRAM

STA RS

-,- I

The complete schedule of performances for the
Dramatic Season, to be held in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, will include matinees each week
on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday at 3:15
o'clock. There will be two added matinee per-
formances on Monday and Tuesday, June 19 and
20. The complete repertory is as follows:
Monday, May 22-"Another Language," with
Tom Powers and Edith Barrett.
Tuesday, May 23-"Another Language."
Wednesday matinee and night, May 24-"An-
other Language."
Thursday, May 25-"Another Language."
Friday matinee and night, May 26-"Spring-
time for Henry" with Violet Heming, Henry Hull,
Rose Hobart and Tom Powers.
Saturday matinee, May 27-- "Another Lan-
guage."
Saturday night, May 27-"Springtime for
Henry."
Monday, May 29-Angna Enters Dance Recital,
Tuesday, May 30-Angna Enters Dance Recital.
Wdenesday matinee and' 'night; May 31-
"Springtime for henry."
Thursday, June 1--"Design for Living," with
Violet Heming, Geoffrey Kerr and Tom Powers.
Friday matinee and night, June 2-"Design for
Living."
Saturday matinee and night, June 3-"Design
for Living."
Monday, June 5-"Design for Living."
Tuesday, June 6-"Design for Living."
Wednesday matinee --and night, June 7-"Ca-
mille" With Miss Jaie Cowl and Rollo- Peters.
Thursday, June 8-"Camille;"
Friday matinee and night, June 9-"Camille."
Saturday matinee and night, June 10-"Ca-;
Mille.,,

. .....,.ee...,. ..-

&STRLPES

__----By Karl Seiffet-'-- - ~
These are trying times. If you want to get
along with the fair sex with April in the air you
have to be prepared to swallow everything, hook,
line, and simper.
* * *
M. 1. A. A. BANSI
'FRESH' SPORTS
--Headline
Like any nice girl would.
AH, THERE, HENRY!
You cannot hope -to sell things unless the
people are employed. The sooner they learn
to do something' for themselves the better it
will be for all.-Henry Ford.
Suggest something, Henry,
* * *
The Milwaukee burglar who, among other'
things, stole a set of golf clubs and a book of
violin lessons was clearly intending to go out on
the course and merely fiddle around.
** *
SENATE DEMANDS
FIGURES ON BUDGET
-Headline
And rightly so-what would a budget be
without figures'?'-
* * *
The Indianapolis fire department was called
recently to extinguish artificial flames in a furni-
ture store window display. Giving the boys the
benefit of the doubt; it is safe to assume that they.
left without kicking in more than three or four
showcases.

tesp.
Reliiu cti vitie
FIRST METHODIST ZION LUTH E RAN
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH CHURCH
Washington St at 5th Ave.
State and Washington Streets E. C. Stellhorn, pastor
Ministers ATEIDJ A I) 9 AM. Bibie 'Sr111. Le s.n T 'rpic:
Frederick B. Fisher T.E NEI) OF JEsUs IN
Peter F. Stair CHURCH OUR LIFE"
10:45-Morning Worship 'A.cc wit onsn
"RE-THINKING MISSIONS" REGULARLY
Dr. ULAhLY "THlE GOD I iIll) AND
Dr. Fishcr HIS FLOCK"
7:30--Evening Worship 5 30 P.M. -Student fellowshlip and
"FINDING GOD THROUGH THE supper
MODERN POETS - CARL 6 30 P.M.-Student Club enterta i -
SANDIURG" ment given by the woinen stu-
Dr. Fisher "Qents.
THE FIRST FIRST BAPTIST
PRESBYTERIAN HJLJEL CHURCH
CHURCH FOUJNDATION East Huron, West of State
Huron and Division Streets car. E. Univ. Ave. and Oakland R. Edward Sayles, Minister
-howard R,. Chapman, University
Merle HK Anderson, Minister Dr. flernard hller, Director Pastor
Alfred Lee Klaer, Associate Minister-' ':0A.--TeCuhSco.Dr
9:30 A.M.--The Church School. Drt'
9:30 A.M.--Student Classes at the ' Albert J. Logan, Superintendent
Church House.
10:45 A.M.- Worship:
10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship. 11:15 A.M. -Regular Sunday morn- Mr. Sayles will preach. Subject:
ing service at t7,,-Women's League "SIITJUAL FER:ITILIZ:ATION"
Dr. Anderson will preach on: chapel. -
"EXPERIENCING THE REALITY
OF A LIVING CHRIST" Prof. W. H. Worrell of the Oriental 12M. TChapman at thei uil ous
Language Department will speak
5:30 P.M. - Social Hour for Young on a inely subject.
People, 6:00 P.M-Student meeting at Guild
House.,
Sunday evening open house
6:30 PM.-Young People's Meeting. at the Foundation. Social hour and refreshments
Arthur Bernhardt will talk onwtv falow
"THE PROBLEM OF EVIL"

1

S

Monday, June 12-"Camille."
Tuesday, June 13-"Twelfth Night," withl
Jane Cowl and 'Tom Powers.
Wednesday matinee and night, June
"Twelfth Night."
Thursday, June 15.-"The Mad Hopes,"
Violet Kemble-Cooper, and Tom Powers.
Friday, matinee and night, June 16-"The
Hopes."

Miss
14-
with
Mad

SLY WINK DEPT.'
"When bankers make a spromise, that's one
thing, but when the miayor makes a promise,
that's different."
-Head of Chicago Teachers Committee.

ST. PAU L'S
LUTHERAN
{MissourtSynod)
Tird and West Liberty
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Sunday. April 30

DQ NQT
NEGLECT
YOU R

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL
CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod)
South Fourth Avenue
Theodore SchmaIe, Pastor
Sunday. April 30
9:00 A. l -MBible School

9:30 A.M.-Service in German

YPST DRYG ODS

10:45 A.M. -Service in English. The ,

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