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April 21, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

From the
PRESS BOX

Cristy Elected
Swim Captain
For 1933-341
Ten Letters Awarded At
Annual Banquet Last
Night; 13 Get Numerals

By John Thomas

Open Track Meet?
Captain DeBaker
DYT, WHY NOT
an Open College'
outdoor track meet
in Ann Arbor for
all. the .colleges in
Mi c higanthis,
pringt '.
When this was
broached t o u s
yesterday we fell
for it like a ton of
bricks. Supporters
uuiia nauLM e dying interest in
track on the campus is due to the
lack of opportunities of seeing Mich-
igan's great track team in the field.
We, personally, are .a little suspi-
cious of this statement about"dying
interest." If one, fully a hundred
told us last Tuesday that Saling was
not spelled with the "t."3 Since, an-
other hundred have -verfed it.
But to. get back to our new love,
an Open College Track meet, it could
be put on for practically nothing.
All the schools interested are close
and could motor over foran after-
noon. We already have the equip-
ment, and with a little: sun, we might,
even have a team ready tp play host.
Or, if Coach Yost and his aids
can't see this, why -not a few dualk
meets with nearby schools such as
Michigan Normal and Michigan,
State College? Otherwise our track-
sters will have only one home meet
under their belt when they try to
recapture the Big Ten title. That is
not enough to put them in first-class
condition for the championship.

T
t
r
t
t
i
s
t
I
k
G

C APTAIN CHARLES DE BAKER
- of Michigan's 1933 track team is
one of those fellows who seems to
keep out of the limelight suocess-
fully-which suits him fine, inci-
dentally.
For three years he was the one
big star at Muskegon High School.
Three years of football were cli-
maxed with an All-State halfback.
position.
Hoyt really wanted DeBaker to be
a half-miler, but the 440 appealed
more to Mutt. His smooth stride that
'fairly eats up the ground and with
his wirey endurance would have
made him one of the outstanding
half-milers in college circles today.
Turner says so and Hoyt says so.
Probably Dee's best race was in
the Illinois meet here last year when.
he turned in the fast time of :48.9
for the 440. This would have won
most meets but this time Ed Russell
was in front of him.
Last year \in the outdoor Confer-
ence meet a characteristic DeBaker
trait appeared.
Eichigan, qualify-
ing four men,
hoped to take first,
third, fourth, and...... ..>
fifth. They drew .
lanes 2, 4, 6, and
3 and could place
their men where-
ever they wanted
to. Russell took
the outside as he
could win anyway, D BAKR..
DeBaker next in lane 6, then Glad
ing, and next to the pole, Ellerby.
As they neared the tape it was evi-
dent Russell could win easily enough
with DeBaker third, and Ellerby
fourth.
But DeBaker was more interested
in urging Glading up to fifth place
than winning third himself and they
finished, Russell, Ellerby, and De-
Baker. Without taking any credit,
from Tom Ellerby, it is widely con-
ceeded that DeBaker could have had
third had he not tried to bring Glad-
ing up into fifth.
Fuqua, of Indiana- and DeBaker
have met three times with two vic-
tories in favor of the Hoosier. De-
Baker is determined to even matters
this year in the Conference meet.
Indoors the race was close and Char-!
ley thinks that he can do it.

James Cristy, '34, of Ann Arbor,
was elected captain of the 1933-34
Michigan swimming team at the nat-
ator's annual banquet held in the
Union last night. At the same time
Coach Matt Mann awarded letters
and numerals to this year's swim-
mers.
Cristy has been a regular member
of the Wolverine team for two years,
swimming in the 220 and 440-yard
free-style events. He led the team to
a Conference championship this year
with victories in both these races,
contributing nearly one fourth of the
total Michigan points.
He has placed second to Ted Wiget,
Stanford's great quarter-miler in the
National Intercollegiates for two
years now and will have a chance to
redeem himself in 1934 when the two
will clash again.
Only four members of this year's
Varsity will be lost by graduation.
They are Captain Johnny Schmieler,
Frank Kennedy, Dan Marcus and
Fred Fenske.
Varsity letters were awarded 10
swimmers while five others received
"aMa" awards. Thirteen yearling
swimmers were granted numerals for
their efforts during the season.
The major awards went to Capt.
Schmieler, Captain-elect Cristy, Ken-
nedy, Marcus, Fenske, Richard Deg-
ener, Henry Kamienski, Robert Ren-
ner and Reeve Bailey.
Secondary awards were given to
Sol Selevan, Bill Boice, John Nolan,
John Dursch and Joe Bailey.
Freshmen to win numerals were
Tex Robertson, Craig Porter, Frank
Freeman, Robert McLeish, Robert
Lawrence, Richmond Blake, Frank
Fehsenfeld, Derland Johnston, Ed-
ward Deifendorf, Dan Schurz, Ed-
ward Gage, Manley Osgood and
David Lewis.
Field Trials Today
For Track Squad
Field trials for field event men
will dominate Michigan track prac-
tice this afternoon, according to an
announcement by Coach Charley
Hoyt yesterday. Time trials for run-
ners will take place Saturday.
Yesterday was a day for rejoicing
among track aspirants, for it was
the first fair day that has come to
rain-weary Ann Arbor this spring.
Coach Hoyt watched his squad
swarm over sun-basked Ferry Field
with satisfacation and expressed the
hope that fair weather had come to
stay and that his charges might get
in form for the Ohio State meet
which is May 6.
Javelin throwers who have been
confined for'some time to tossing the
spear into the jumping pits at Yost
Field House were making the most
of their first opportunity to limber
up in earnest.
TENNIS TRYOUTS
All freshmen who are interested
in Varsity tennis should report to
Coach Johnstone sometime this
week. Johnstone will be found at
his office in the Intramural Building
or on the outdoor tennis courts every
afternoon.

Fischer, Jolly Appear
As 1933 Golf Big Shots
Johnny Fischer is still at it. So
early in the season the pride of
the Michigan linksmen has shot a
70 and 71 for his qualifying round
for a Varsity position. The re-
mainder of the squad's makeup
will be determined in the final
rounds today for both freshmenj
and Varsity players.
It is expected that Captain Alex
Jolly will qualify easily, although
lack of practice may hamper him
greatly. Veterans from last year's
Varsity freshman and "B"
teams, besides Captain Jolly and
Fischer, who are expected to be
back are D a y t o n, Markham,
Sweet, Seeley, McKinley, and
Neahr.
old Rivals Tof
Meet In Charity
BoxingShow
Intense rivalry will feature at least
two of the 20 bouts in the Good Will
Boxing Show next Wednesday night
at Yost Field House.
The matching of two Ann Arbor
boys, Art Staugh and "Buzz" Mc-
cleery in the middleweight division
has attracted great interest in local
fight circles. Antagonism exists be-
tween the two fighters concerning
their superiority in the ring.
Staugh and MCleery are well
known locally for their participation
in the Silver Shield and Golden
Gloves tourneys, but they have never
met in the squared circle. Both the
boys and their respective followings
await with interest the outcome.
Diamond Squad
Works For Big"
Ten Game Here
Coach Ray Fisher was not too well
pleased with the showing of Michi-
gan's Varsity diamond team in its
debut Wednesday. The mentor's
chief trouble is going to be inspiring
good but inexperienced men with the
confidence which means snap in
fielding and extra hits at bat.
To this end Coach Fisher was
working yesterday as Michigan was
taking the worst end of a practice
game against Ypsilanti. Maize-and-
Blue hitters were ordered not to take
a swing at the ball until one strike
had been called on them. Batting
confidence is what they were working
for. Artz and Petoskey were doing
some hitting, but the rest of the
club looked weak.
Although Fisher pronounced him-
self as fairly well pleased with the
hurlers who worked in the opener,
Fish had a bad inning against the
Normal club yesterday. Tillotson
performed creditably for three in-
nings and then weakened slightly in
the fourth to allow one run. McKay
followed Fish to the mound.
The home ope!5er will be staged
at Ferry Field tomorrow afternoon
as Michigan meets Illinois in a con-
ference contest. The Illini had a
good club last year, splitting the sea-
son with the Wolverines at one game
apiece.
T HAT N EW DEA L
IS AT DEL PRETE'S
Genuine Buck
SHOES

White or Brown
Regular. $5 Values
$3.95
They're so Smart, so good look-
ing, so good in quality, you just
can't afford to pass them up.
Topcoat Sale
Plain Gray and Tan
Polo Coats, and Tweed
Values to $29
Spring Suits
Tailored to our strict speci-
fications by Schloss and
Stein Block
$18.50 to $35.00
Custom Tailored
SU ITS
Designed in our own shop.
Order Now. Reduced
SPRING HATS
Values to $6.00
1l A. a r 1 et M& Aa r"

Detroit Errors
Give Cleveland
3 To 1 Victory
Giants Defeat Boston To
Hold Lead In National;
Mackmen Beat Solons
(By TheAssociated Press)
NEW YORK, April 20.-Carl Hub-
bell fanned 13 and allowed but four
singles as the New York Giants cele-
brated the opening of the local Na-
tional League season today with a 1
to 0 shutout over the Boston Braves.
Clint Brown limited Detroit to 4
hits as costly Tiger errors gave the
Indians a 3 to 0 victory yesterday.-
'The standings:
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York ............ 5 0 1.000
Chicago-..............5 2 .714
Cleveland ............ 4 2 .667
Washington .......... 3 4 .429
Boston ............... 2 3 .400
Detroit ............... 2 4 .333
St. Louis .............2 5 .286
Philadelphia ......... 2 5 .286
Thursday's Results
Cleveland 3-5-0. C. Brown and
Spencer; Detroit 1-4-4. Sorrell and
Hayworth, Reiber.
Philadelphia 8-11-0. Grove and
Cochrane; Washinton 1-4-1. Stew-
art, L. Thomas and Sewell.
Chicago 5-8-0. Durham, Frasier,
Heving and Grube; St. Louis 4-9-0.
Knott, L. Brown and Ferrell.
Only games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Southern Trip For
Illini Baseballers
Ruined By Weather
A thousand-mile spring training
tour into central Ohio proved to be
of little value to Coach Carl Lund-
gren's Illini baseball team when the
fourth and final game of the trip,
against Miami University, was called
off because of rain and wet grounds.
Altogether the varsity played only
one out of the four contests sched-
uled for them in Ohio. On Friday
they vanquished Ohio University,
8 to 2, but a doubleheader against
the same team on Saturday was
stricken from the books when tor-
rential rains besieged the Athens
diamond.
The O r a n g e- and - Blue forces
climbed back' into their cars yester-
day after the "rain--no game" deci-
sion was thrust on them, and headed
for university property. They arrived
in Urbana last night and will work
out today in preparation for their
first Big Ten engagement, which will
be against Michigan this Saturday.
I-M BASEBALL RESULTS
Delta Kappa Epsilon, 13; Delta
Upsilon, 10.
Alpha Delta Phi, 7; Zeta Beta
Tau, 6.
Psi Upsilon, 7; Theta Delta Chi, 0.
Sigma Nu, 7; Delta Phi, 1.
Sigma Phi, 11; Alpha Sigma Phi, 8.
Phi Kappa Psi, 18; Phi Rho Sig-
ma, 2.
Beta Theta Pi, 10; Theta Chi, 8.
Chi Phi, 6; Zeta Psi, 5.
Delta Tau Delta, 3; Lambda Chi
Alpha, 0.
Theta Xi, 12; Triangle, 5.

W L
New York ............ 2 0
Pittsburgh 3 1
Brooklyn ......... .3 2
Chicago..............3 2
Philadelphia......3 3
Cincinnati.......1 2
St. Louis ... . ..... 1 3
Boston............... 0 3
Thursday's Results
New York 1-8-0. Hubbell

Pet.
1.000
.750
.600
.600
.500
.333
.250
.000
and

Mancuso; Boston 0-4-0. Frank-
house and Hogan.
Philadelphia 10-13-3. Elliott,
Pearce and Davis. Brooklyn 2-4-2.
Clark, Benge, Mungo, J. Lucas and
Lopez.
Chicago 3-6-1. Malone a n d
Hartnett. St. Louis 1-6-0. Dean,
Carleton and J. Wilson.
Pittsburgh -Cincinnati, no game,
rain.
HOME RUNS
Foxx, Philadelphia, 2.

Opportuni-ty
KNO CKS TWICE'
* FIRST, by having your racket restrung
with an Armour branded tennis string
you are assured of a genuine gut string famous
everywhere for speed.
Second, by having your racket restrung with
genuine Armour branded strings, you can
obtain, free, a flexible, water-proof cover, of
stout rubberized material, for your racket,
with a special tape fastener for closing. This
is given free with every restringing job done
with Armour branded strings.
Have your restringer show you this cover,
and ask him about Tilden, Jr., the lowest-
priced genuine sheep-gut string made-
which you can have strung in your racket for
only $5. For tournament play try Armour's
Super-Special, or Davis Cup, or Tilden Cham-
pionship--each one of them an achieve-
ment in speed and strength by the Armour
String Kraf ters.
BIG BILL SAYS . . . "Because of the
careful selection of raw material, care-
ful processing and proper seasoning,
which Armour String Krafters apply to
their strings, I heartily recommend
them as the best on the market for
resiliency, speed and durability.
"I used Armour's Tennis Strings to
win Wimbledon for the third time."

It has been our purpose to give
to Ann Arbor and its students
the kind of a shop and barber
service we are sure they deserve.
We have tried our utmost and
the result has been gratifying.
Now, after the fire, we are more
than ever determined to live up
to our purpose. Bring in your
buddy and be convinced. See
how nice we have made the
shop for your satisfaction.
KEEP WELL GROOMED
by
THE GROOMWEL LL
BARBERS
815 E Liberty 812 S. State

- ,:

Z

r

IARMOUR

TENNIS

STRINGS

BY THE

JtrLLq ](rwft'C46,

L. Sewell, Washington.

ELECTRIC TROUSER PRESSER
NEWLY DEVELOPED electric appliance will put a perfect crease
in your suit or pleated skirt in less than three minutes. Convenient
and economical to use. Mail orders filled promptly. Price $2.50.
G. R. OLSON, Box 94, East Orange, N. J.

THE

CH0IC E

O F

CHAM PION S

READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

Bulletin!

Mi lon's Shop
For Men
119 South Main St.
Where values and service
are supreme and where
prices are consistent with
fine merchandise.
Never have such fine
SUITS and
TOPCOATS
sold at so small a price-
They're .. .

Co rbett's
Sensational
Values
are the talk of
the town!
TOPCOATS, All- $ 95
Tweed Polo Coats I I
SUITS$12
$24.50 Suits. I61
Extra trousers......$2.95
SUITS $2.00
$34.50 Value
Extra trousers ....$3.50
PAJAMAS $119
$1.50 Glover's... I.
COOPER'S UNDERWEAR
50c Shirts and $1.00
Shorts, 3 for.......I
COOPER'S HOSIERY
35c Whites and % 00
Pastels, 4 pair
SANFORIZEDSSHIRTS
White or Colors,$ 75
$1.25 Values, 3 fore

i

n"a
.

I~oo

I '

i ,

Like' a

13.so

Whose Birthday
Is Today?
Your remembrance should be FLOWERS. When you
send flowers you express your sentiments far better than
you can in words. Flowers bring cheer to the shut-ins
and brighten the wearisome hours. Flowers are now at
the lowest prices in memory, quality considered. For
your friends in distant places, our telegraph service makes
it possible to have flowers delivered at no extra cost other
than price of wire.

and

EXCEPT BETTER! Kellogg's Corn Flakes are
the kind of breakfast that helps you feel fit
and alert all day through. These delicious
flakes are rich in energy and so easy to digest
they don't "load you up."
Eat a bowl of Kellogg's instead of hot,
heavy dishes when you want a quick and
delicious lunch.
And what could be better for a bedtime
snack! Drop in at a nearby restaurant and
enjoy a bowl of Kellogg's. You'll sleep better
because of something light and digestible.

$18,50

$1.95 Values
3 for . . . . .

$4.65

Don't put it off! See our
values today! Many, stu-
dents are taking advantage
of our low prices and fine
service.

Gordon Leather
Jackets $4.95 - $5.95
TRENCH COATS
Heavy weight, $7.95
Extra long
LA SALLE HATS 95
Snap Brim........I..
Flannel Slacks
Grey, tan, brown. .$ -5
Just;received large shipment
Flannel Sport Coats and
White Flannel Slacks
0

WHY NOT YOU?

The most popular ready-
to-eat cereals served in
the dining-rooms of
American colleges, eating
clubs and fraternities are
made by Kellogg in Batle
Creek. They include
Kellogg's ALL-BRAN,
PEP Bran Flakes, Rice
Krispies, Wheat Krum-

CORN
FLAKES
O VEN-FRESH
SFLAVOR-PERFECT

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