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April 20, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICTVIGAN DAILY

PA

I'

From the
PRESS BOX
By John Thomas

Red Sox, Yankees
* * *
ASEBALL has seen
two important and
B interesting points in
the American
League since the
season -started in
E addition to the
f a i tt suggestion
it that the Tigers may
not be cuite as good
as they were rated.
The first point is made by the
Boston Red Sox. Nothing in the
major league season hs been quite
so startling as the maglficent show-
ing of the Sox, for years the door-
mat of the American League.
The standings, coldly mathemat-
ical, show the Sox with two victories
in five starts, but it might just as
well have been five vito ies and no
defeats. Manager Mrty McManus'
moundsmen, called upon o face the
clubs picked to finish one-two, the
Yankees and the Senators, have al-
lowed precisely 32 hits in five games,
a few more than six per game.
The "breaks" cost the Sox their
first two games with the Yankees,
Paul Andrews, Bob Kline, and John
Welch held the champions to nine
hits while Boston was clouting Ver-
non Gomez for 12 in the opener but
Gehrig's homer with two on beat
them, 4 to 3.
Bob Weiland granted only five
safeties in the second battle but
Charley Ruffing's homer with the
bases filled in the ninth won again,
6 to 2. Dusty Rhodes and Kline col-
laborated on another five-hit master-
piece against Washington Saturday
but once more the Sox found Lady
Luck frowning on them and they
went down, 2 to 1.
Finally they broke into the win-
ning column, 4 to 2, spilling the Sen-
ators as Henry Johnson, Kline, and
Welch, held Washington to four hits.
And in the process, the Sox cracked
Alvin Crowder's two year winning
streak, of 16 games in succession.
Then they drove Whitehill from
the mound and pastered Al Thomas
who followed him, with 10 hits to
win, 6 to 4. This looks quite a bit dif
ferent than one would expect from
the doormat of the league.
Then too, there's the Yankees.
Their type of baseball is either ex-
tremely good pitching or extremely
strong hitting. One of these methods
usually wins for them.
But this year it's different. Of
course the idea is to win the game
and they have, five 'straight. But
their method is different. They have
been outhit game after tame, yet
manage to win.
When their hitting starts coming
in big dishfulls and their shutout
pitching is registered, the American
League may see another runaway
year. When you can't even defeat
them in early season games as you
outhit them, what is a team sup-
posed to do when their hitting im-
proves and Gome, Allen, Ruffing,
and company start limiting the op-
position to a small handful of scat-
tered hits per game?

Spring Football
Gridders Look
Like FallSquad'
Everhardus And chmidt
Punt Well; Ends Cover
In Tackling Drills
Passes Practiced
Renner And Tessmer Toss
Ball Nicely; Miller And
Schultz Best Receivers
Looking more like a fall squad
every day, Michigan's Varsity foot-
ball candidates turned out yesterday
to find a stiff drill on plays await-
ing them. Preliminary warm-ups
began the workout with Everhardus
and Schmidt punting some fair
spirals down the field and the ends
working in teams to cover them and
smother the backs receiving the
kicks.
Everhardus was doing some good
punting down wind yesterday, al-
though his kicks
were not up to fall
standard. Backs
and ends were
separated from the
linemen and a
drill on four pass
plays followed.
Coach Kipke
stressed angles for
receivers. W i t h
Everhardus, Ren-
ner, and Tessmer
doing the tossing,
the backs and ends managed to snag
a fair percentage
Bill Renner and Zit Tessmer were
doing some good work in getting off
the aerials, but Everhardus, normal-
ly a good passer, was having some
trouble in pushing them out yester-
day. Miller and Schultz among the
wingmen were doing some good re-
ceiving.
Linemen Have Workout
On another part of the gridiron,
Coach Blott was putting his line
candidates through an offensive-de-
fensive workout which featured the
finer points of line play. Tackles,
guards, and centers lined up repeat-
edly and came together with re-
sounding thuds as the ball was
snapped and the solitary runner
without interference cracked the
line.
Fundamentals and plays will prob-
ably comprise the Wolverine sched-
ule for Thursday and Friday, but
Saturday the gridders will get a real
treat in a long scrimmage session.
Here the new shift will probably face
the test of competition and Coach
Kipke will get a better chance to size
up his material.
Softball Schedule
Opens With 16 Tilts
Intramural softball began yester-
day when 32 teams played 16 games
on South Ferry Field.
Sixty-four fraternity and 20 inde-
pendent teams have signed up for
competition. A separate faculty soft-
ball league is expected to be organ-
ized soon.

Archery Meets
Next Sport On
Women's Card
Women's outdoor spring athletic,
programs feature archery as one of
the most important of their sports.
An intercollegiate telegraphic meet
will be shot off some time in May.
Tournaments and archery-golf are
also on the slate for this activity.
The Intercollegiate shoot will be
against co-eds from most of the Big
Ten schools, as well as other promi-
nent colleges of the middle west.
Archery-golf is a new sport for
Michigan women. The tournament
will be played off on May 10 with
teams composed of two archers from
each house..
Campus competition in the archery
tourney will be divided into two
groups, according to the archers'
ability. All those who can make a
score of better than 75 will enter the
Columbia round division. The eight
finishing highest from this series will
comprise the team to represent
( Michigan in the intercolelgiate meet.
Those entering the handicap round
must shoot off a preliminary trial of
24 arrows from a distance of 30
yards. This must be completed by
May 14.
The Columbia round requirements
are 24 arrows shot from distances
of 30, 40, and 50 yards. This is for
experienced archers, and the handi-
cap division widens the scope of the
tourney to include the beginners.
Varsity Swimmers Will
Elect Captain Tonight
The Varsity swimming season will
close officially tomorrow when mem-
bers of the Varsity and freshman
squads hold their annual banquet at
the Union.
At that time Varsity letter winners
will elect next year's captain and
Coach Matt Mann will announce
Varsity letter and freshman numeral
awards. Capt. John Schmieler said
yesterday the speaker of the evening
would probably be Athletic Director
Fielding H. Yost.
ROSS DOES A 68
Donald Ross, builder of golf
courses, is no mean golfer. He turned
in a card of 68 for the Pinehurst
championship course.

In First

Practice

Freshman baseball, under the
tutelage of Coach Bennie Oosterbaan, I
is well on way now with a squad of
over 30 aspirants working out daily'
on the freshman field.
The first organized practice was
held Tuesday afternoon and warm-
up drills were featured. Coach Oos-
terbaan confined them to light calis-
thentics and the playing of "pep-
per." Last night practice got better
under way and batting and infield
drill was the order of the day. Uni-
forms have not yet been issued and
probably will not be for some time.
Battery men have been training
for some time now with the Varsity!
squad and are further advanced than
their teammates. The pitchers espe-
cially have shown up well in early
practices, and held their own on sev-
eral occasions against Varsity bat-
ters.
Two N ew Yo rk moundsmen,
Charles Lundy and Daniel Kilner,
show possibilities of developing into
players of Varsity caliber. As in
previous years, freshman baseball
will be confined to scrimmages with
the regulars and games among them-
selves.
I. M. Will Hold
SpringProgram
All spring sports will be conducted
by the University throughout the
season, it was sannounced yesterday.
was announced yesterday.
There are 10 major sports that
will require the use of most of Ferry
Field until Jhie, some for fraterni-
ties, some forlindependents, some for
all-campus competition, and others
that will include all types.
The more important outside activi-I
ties are baseball and tennis. In the
latter, competition is for fraternities
and independents, and .will include
both singles and doubles. The sched-
ule is carded from April 25, and the
all-campus matches are to be played
at a date to be announced later.
The winner of these matches will re-
ceive 100 points for their respective
organizations.

Frosh Diamond Men
Go ThroQugh Paces

Committeemen
Start Sale Of
Boxing Tickets
40 Men To Cover Campus
Houses; Proceeds Will
Go To Student Fund
An intensive campaign for the sale
of tickets to the Good Will Boxing
Show got under way yesterday when
40 Union committeemen started a
drive to cover every campus frater-
nity and -sorority and reach every
student.
Tickets for the show, which will
be held at 7:30 p. m. next Wednes-
day in Yost Field House, are selling
at 40 cents. There will be no re-"
served seats but the capacity of the
Field House should be sufficient to
provide excellent points of vantage
for all.
Small Amount For Expense
Only a small percentage of the
money realized on the ticket sale will
be used to pay expenses while the
rest will be turned over to the Stu-
dent Loan Fund. The only expensesE
incurred will be for traveling ex-
penses for outstate competitors, for
advertising and tickets and for offi-
cials.
Vernon Larson, freshman boxing
coach, is donating his services as
promoter and Matt Mann, Varsity
swimming coach, has accepted the
job of announcer, for which he will
receive no pay. John Huss, '33, and
Robert Salstein, '34, are serving as
chairmen of tle ticket committees.
University boxers will have the
help of Larson's .advice during their
last week of preparation since the
boxing coach has returned to Ann
Arbor and will be at Waterman
Gymnasium every afternoon.
He plans to announce the other
fights on the 20-bout card during
the next few days, while the Field
House will be prepared for the show
early next week.
HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED
Minimum Price 50 cents
Genuine Factory Work-We Make Hats
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St.. ?Near State

MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
New York ............ 5 0 1.000
Chicago .............. 4 2 .667
Cleveland.............3 2 .600
Washington .......... 3 3 .500
Detroit ............... 2 3 .400
Boston ............... 2 3 .400
St. Louis .............2 4 .333
Athletics .............1 5 .163
Wednesday's Results
St. Louis.......000 000 000-0 3 2
Chicago . ...101 000 10*-3 7 1
Batteries: Coffman, Gray and Sor-
rell; Lyons and Grube.
Detroit at Cleveland, wet grounds.

The island of Capri has been
bird sanctuary.

FOOTBALL MANAGERS
All freshmen and sophomores in-
terested in trying out for a position
as a football manager are asked to
see Ray Fiske at Yost Field House
or on South Ferry Field after 3 p. m.
today.

a

C

II

'._.
rte. 6°'
\ '~

I '

Boston at
Athletics
grounds.

Washington, rain.
at New York,

wet

," ?l'J .&nrvoto S.see il,
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET
CLOTHIERS - FURNISHERS
HATTERS
The Downtown Store
For Michigan Men

NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York.
Pittsburgh
Brooklyn . .
Chicago .
Phillies n
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Boston ..

W L
........... 1 0
. ..... 3 1
. ..... 3 1
......... .. 2 2
.23.. . .
.12....

Pet.
1.003
.750
.750
.500
.400
.333
.333
.000

Men!

Wednesday's Results
Brooklyn ...000 001 000 1-2
Boston.....000 000 100 0-1

5
8

1
1

What Values

Batteries: Beck and Lopez; Brandt
and Hogan.
VARSITY GYMNASTICS
Anyone interested in Varsity
gymnastics should report to Coach
West at 4 p. m. Friday in the
auxiliary gymnasium, Intramural
Building.

A
EN AVANT
A
A
A
n^

a :
s

ne an
A
A

SLACKS..... .$395
Wool & Flannel, Greys & Tans
WHIPCORD . . $3.95
Stripes & Plain Colors
WOOL. . $3.45 & $3.95
Plains & Checks in Grey & Tans
SPORT" COATS
$9.50 and $10.50
in Plain and Fancy Pattern
Trench Rain Coats . ..$2.95
Another shipment just received!
These coats are extra long
SPRING HATS . . . $2.95
Snap Brims in Tans & Greys
HOSIERY. . . 4 pr. $1.00
Fancy patterns in Silk
2 Pc. UNDERWEAR 3 for $1
Shirts and Shorts

Burr, Patterson & Auld Co.
Detroit, Michigan & WaIerville, Ontario
A ^n
For your convenience
Ann Arbor Store
603 Church St.
FRANK OAKES Mgr.

It

11

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*NowSfiowwG*
EHARDEEN
PACKING CASE ESCAPE
s e esa 55%E MENis2WaMME EMN

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2

LAST NIGHT I SAW WV
H ARDE E N DO A
WONDERFUL.ESCAPE
ACT.
::...... .. ..
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SENIORS!

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ORDER TODAY!

Orders Accepted By
Telephone-Phone 6915

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