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April 19, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, APRIL 19, 1933

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PGE '

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

From the
PR SS BOX
By John Thomas
More Yankee Publicity
Kipke's Carnival

Wolverine Nine Wolves Practice
Mee ts Hillsdale' Guard Shift For
In Opener Today EarlyWorkout
Game At Hilltopper Park Gridders Continue Work

:1- t'* -

O E McCARTHY'S
Yankees come in for
a little extra base-
ball publicity again
as Ruth has been
walked a total of 1,-
818 times during his
- long career. This
represents 31 miles
of traveling, from
home to first base
1,818 times, which
may be responsible for his aging.
Then of course there is a first
baseman by the name of Lou Gehrig
who watched Everett Scott and his
long string of continuously-played
games in 1925 and then decided that
this record, which everyone said
would never be broken, would be as
good to shoot at as any. Now Gehrig
nears it with a string of 1,200 con-
#inuously-played games and if he
finishes the season he'll break the
mar} with thirty some games to
spare.
* * * -
FOOTBALL COACH Harry Kipke is
planning a gala program for the
second annual Spring Football Dem-
onstration scheduled for Saturday,
May 6.
Invitations have been sent out to
several hundred high school players
and coaches to attend the football
festival. Last year more than 250
out-of-town guests attended Kipke's
carnival and he has hopes for a still
larger turnout May 6.
The morning program includes
demonstrations featuring the kicking
game, the passing game, and the six-
man line defense as contrasted with
a seven-man line. Selected athletes
will be put through their paces led
by All-American Bernard.
In the afternoon the guests will
see the Ohio State-Michigan outdoor
track meet and after the conclusion
of this meet, the final Spring foot-
ball game will be played in the
stadium. Both teams in this game
will be as evenly matched as it is
possible to make them, Kipke said, in
the hopes that a good battle will
wind up the program.
MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Begins With Both Teams
Rated Below Form
P atchin Due To Start
Paulson, Teitlebaum And
Oliver Will Make First
Varsity Appearance
Michigan's baseball team will jour-
ney to Hillsdale this afternoon to
meet the Dalers in the first offi-
cial game on the Maize-and-Blue
card.
The Wolverines have played three
unofficial contests with Michigan
State Normal, but today's game will
be the first real test for Ray Fisher's
team.
Hillsdale has yet to win a contest,
having lost to Iowa in their last start,
the game in which Iowa registered
the only victory they scored during
their invasion of Michigan. Fifteen
Dalers were retired on strikes in this
game.
Of the eleven men making the trip,
seven saw service on the Maize-and-
Blue team last year. Only Paulson,
Patchin, Oliver, and Teitelbaum will
be taking the field
for Michigan for
the first time.
Whitey Wistert,
made over out-
fielder, a n d Art
Patchin, star of .
last year's fresh-
man team, will do
the hurling. Pat-
chin is slated to
start on the
mound but Wistert WI5T5 T ,
is certain to see
service. The performances in today's
game will settle the pitching assign-
ment for the Conference opener with
Illinois Saturday.
Three veterans will occupy the out-
field. Avon Artz, who led the team
in hitting against Ypsilanti, will play
right field, with Gene Braendle, vet-
eran of two seasons, in left, and Ted
Petoskey in center.
Russ Oliver and Clay Paulson are
still battling for the second base post
although the former seems to' have
the edge, being listed to start. Oliver,
star in basketball
and football, is a
sophomore w h o
did not play fresh-
man baseball, and
his prowess is un-
certain. Paulson,
first baseman on
the Phys-Ed team
of 1932, is a hard-
hitting youth.
Captain Mike
Diffley, the only
veteran receiver,
will be at his accustomed place be-
hind the plate.
The probable Michigan lineup fol-
lows :
Artz............Right Field
Waterbor ......Third Base
Braendle........ Left Field
Petoskey ...... Center Field
Diffley ............Catcher
Oliver ........ Second Base
Teitelbaum ...... Shortstop
Manuel .........First Base
Patchin............Pitcher

On Fundamentals; Plan
Scrimmage Saturday
Scattered showers yesterday after-
noon found a "business as usual"
sign on South Ferry Field where
Coach Harry Kipke and the Mich-
igan coaching staff were putting the
Wolverine gridders through the sec-
ond workout after the vacation.
The Wolves were putting plenty of
snap into the work yesterday after-
noon, and the practice found the
squad divided into groups for special-
ized work. Coach Kipke himself put
the backfield through a passing drill,
and Everhardus, Fay, Schmidt, Re-
mias and others were showing up
well under his tutelage.
Guards and tackles worked on the
new "rump-wheel" shift, which is go-
ing to require careful timing and
practice on balance on the part of
the guards. The formation looks de-
ceptive in practice and may be an
asset to next fall's outfit.
A yearling backfield worked on lat-
eral passes and fake laterals in or-
der to learn the technique of decep-
tion and some difficult ball-handling
required by passes behind the line of
scrimmage.
Regular practice on plays and fun-
damentals is on the bill for the grid-
iron squad during the remainder of
the week with a scrimmage set ten-
tatively for Saturday.

Second Hole Called
Hardest On Course
By. Captain Fischer
It was too wet at the University
golf course yesterday afternoon for
the team to get in their daily prac-3
tice licks and talk in the clubhouse
turned to eccentricities of the layout.
Captain Johnny Fischer was
spokesman. Asked what he consid-
ered the toughest hole on the course,
he immediately named number 2 and
the remainder of the group seemed
to agree. That hole is usually played
against the wind and is uphill. It is
420 yards long with a par of four.
Every shot is an all-carry and it is
additionally troublesome because of
the absence of roll at the end of
each shot.
The caddy master modified John-
ny's statement somewhat by remark-
ing that there was no such thing
as a tough hole on any course. It is
entirely up to the individual and the
quality of his game. "Some days
when you're on to your game you
can play any hole like a champion,
and on other occasions when you
are not feeling so good your game
may fall far below its usual stand-
ard," he said.
Joe Stripp, Brookiyn third base-
man, is said to be financially inde-
pendent, playing baseball strictly for
love of the game. Yet he was one of
the year's most stubborn holdouts.

Women's Nines
Start Outdoor
Drill This Week
Candidates for the women's dia-
mond squads in both Interclass and
Intramural divisions will take to the
outdoor fields this week for the first
time this year. Interclass players
went out yesterday afternoon and
the sorority teams start outdoor drill
today.
All classes started practice yester-
day, contrary to the first announce-
ment which divided the group in two
divisions playing on different days.
Betty Lyons is in charge of the In-
terclass drills, and has four class
managers as assistants. Alice Stryker
is the senior manager, Charlotte
Simpson the junior pilot, Lois Jotter
the sophomore and Gertrude Walker
the freshman manager.
Intramural nines will have the use
of the Palmer Field diamonds on
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
afternoons. House managers are re-
quested to turn in their time prefer-
ences of 4 or 5 p. m. on these days
by this afternoon.
A preliminary round-robin tourna-
ment will initiate the Inttramural
season, followed by straight elimina-
tion competition. A team must win
through two round-robin games to
get into the final series.

i

CORBETT'S
SPRING SALE
IS A REAL SENSATION!

Fro sh Springy
Program Gets,
Under Motion
All Freshmen required physical ed-
ucation activities began Monday,
April 17, according to an announce-
ment made by Dr. G. A. May, head
of physical education department,
yesterday.
Dr. May said that all facilities
were ready for use and all fresh-
men were expected to attend their
respective spring sports twice every
week. Men signed up for tennis,
swimming, or soft ball, but report at-
tendance in the foyer of the In-
tramural Building. Golf shall be re-
corded by the turning in of greens
fee tickets. Baseball men's names
must appear on Coach Oosterbaan's
freshman baseball list, and men tak-
ing wrestling, boxing, or gymnasium
work, must report at Waterman
Gym.

Just received a New Shipment of
Suits not fdish-but authentic
in style and exceptional in quality
$27.50 to $33.50. (No charge for
Alterations.)

Group I
ALL $24.50
SUITS
$16.80
Extra Trousers $2.95

LIGHT
COLORS
MEDIUM
GREYS

OXFORDS
AND BLUES
SINGLE OR
DOUBLE
BREASTED

Group II
ALL $34.50
SU ITS
$23. ,00
Extra Trousers $3.50

TO PCOATS
$19.50 to $30. Values
$l16.95
Choice of the Entire Stock
Full or Half Belt

h... . "

11

EXTRA SPECIAL
TWEED TOPCOATS
POLO MODELS
$14.95,

NEW PLAID SHIRTS
Sanforized Shrunk with a Smart
New Collar- Only $1.95

AM6
ZTI

WALK A FEW STEPS AND SAVE DOLLARS
TOM CORBEFT'T

YOUNG MEN'S SHOP

116 EAST LIBERTY ST.

'i

W L
New York ............5 0
Cleveland............3 2
Chicago ..............3 2
Washington..........,3 3
Detroit............... 2 3
Boston ....2 3
St. Louis.......2 3
Philadelphia........1 5
Tuesday's Results

Pet.
1.000
.600
.600
.500
.400
.400
.400
.366

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NECKWEAR

Several dozen new Foulard and
white ground Regimental striped
Ties for $1.00.
A Small Selection, of Wool Ties
Formerly $1.00, Now 2 for $1.25

Chicago..........016 300 110-12
Detroit...........000 000 000- 0
Batteries: Detroit-Bridges, Hog-
sett and Hayworth; Chicago-Jones
and Grube.
Boston .............100 000 410-6
Washington ..........120 001 000-4
Batteries : Washington-Whitehill,
Thomas and Sewell; Boston-An-
drews, Kline and Shea.

Men !

Cleveland ..
St. Louis .
Batteries:
Spencer. St.
Ferrell.

.....000 000 000-0
..... 000 010 00*-1
Cleveland-Harder and
Louis-Blaeholder and

* FREE-with every restringing job done with
Armour branded tennis strings - a water-proof
cover for your tennis racket, of flexible, rubberized
material, with a stout tape fastener for closing.
This offer is for a limited time only, and is being
made to start your tennis playing right this year,
with Armour strings-famous the world over for
strength and speed.

SPORT SUITS-and
SPORT COATS

NATIONAL LEAGUE

"Forward March"
and
"Business as Usual"

Gaberdine Suits .......
Gaberdine Sport Coats...
Harris Cloth Coats .....

.... $25.00
$15.00
$12.50

_{
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New York........ .
Pittsburgh _...........
Brooklyn............
Chicago.. ........
Philadelphia...
St. Louis........ .
Cincinnati..........
Boston...............

W L
4 0
3 1.
2 1
2 2
2 3
1 2
1a2
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Pct.
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Tilden, Jr. -the lowest-

Monday's Results
Philadelphia ........000 001 000-1
New York ...........000 200 00*-2
Batteries: Athletics - Earnshaw
and Madjewski; New York-Gomez
and Dickey.
Pittsburgh ..........000 000 001-1
Chicago ............000 000 021-3
Batteries: Pittsburgh - Swetonic
and Grace; Chicago*-Warneke and
Hartnett.
Brooklyn-Boston: Rain.
St. Louis-Cincinnati: Rain.
Home Runs
Suhr, Pirates.
FROSH NETTERS CALLED
Freshmen who are interested in

$ UetowSrvb'41"
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Here are
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Spring
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Armour's Super-Special is favored widely for
tournament play. Other fast Armour strings are
Tilden Championship and Davis Cup.
Your restringer will gladly advise you which
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11

I I

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