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April 05, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MA

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Warits Hitter Foes

Association 0 'Public School Budget Slashes
Ch~ild Health Jam Classes, Carrothers S

days

Holds Meetintg
Pronineit Authorities To
Attend Sessions; Panel
Discussions To Be Used

l The most profound effect of the
slashing of budgets in our public
schools has been to overcrowd the
classes," Prof. George E. Carrothers
of the School of Education, director
of the Bureau of Co-operation with

The American Child Health As- Educational Institutions, said yes-
will hold its seventh Health terday. The number of students in
socatin wll olditssevnththe classes has risen to 50 and 60
Education Conference during the which is much too large for thea
week of June 20 to 24 as a guest of teacher to control, he said.
th- University, it was announced yes- Likewise, Professor Carrothers said,{
terday by Dr. John Sundwall, direc- due to the decrease in expenditures,
tor of the hygiene department and } the teaching staffs have been cut,
head of the general committee on ar- the result being that the remaining
I angements. teachers are over-burdened with
Some of the most prominent health fork and so find no time to assist
l authorities in the country will be the pupils in his or her work. They
here in connection with the confer- are forced to teach more subjects,
ence, Dr. Sundwall said. It will, he some of which they are not suflici-
added, be the largest child health ently prepared to teach.
meeting in the United States this Because of this neglect many pu-
year. Between 400 'and 500 people pils have dropped out of school, espe-
are expected to attend the session. cially the less mature ones, who are
Discussions will be held on the in the greatest need of help and ad-
panel system. Sessions will be devot- vice. Professor Carrothers stated that
ed to discussions on present trends it is a fair assumption that some of
in child health, the effects of the de- these will turn anti-social, becom-
pression on child health and conser- ing juvenile delinqucats; whereas if
vation, and methods of dealing with they had been given special attention

ing school budgets he said, has been
to eliminate the finer courses, such
as music, drama, and art, which
heretofore have been tremendous
factors in holding the students' in-
terest in their scholastic work.
Also, many high school post-grad-
uates have been crowded out. Added
to this is the attemp, on the part
of those fortunate enough to remain
to insist upon more time to be given
them in instruction by teachers al-

ready over-worked. This is not only
unfair to the teachers, but to the
high school students themselves, to
whom the teachers' time rightfully
belongs.
Professor Carrothers pointed out
that the elimination of many post-
graduate students has given rise to
the so-called "depression colleges,"
which are appearing throughout the
country. Located in large cities, they
are made up of faculties recruited
from various sources; and offer the
students college courses correspond-
ing roughly to those given by estab-
lished colleges, for an annual tuition
fee of about $50.

Associated Press Photo
The U. S. Senate may investigate
the records of the vast banking house
of J. P. Morgan Co., as a result of
refusal 'of the firm to supply infor-
mation to Ferdinand Peeora, Senate
banking committee counsel in charge
of the stock market inquiry.
St ockin Plans
Phar maceutical
nspection Trip
Prof. C. H. Stocking of the Collegej
of Pharmacy, who is president of the
American Association of Colleges of
Pharmacy, will inspect five member'
colleges in the South on a tour to be
made during the vacation next week,
it was announced yesterday.
Colleges of pharmacy which Pro-
fessor Stocking will visit are those of
the University of Louisville at Louis-
Ville, Ky., the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Univer-
ity of South Carolina at Columbia,
and the University of Florida at
3ainesville. He will also visit the de-
partment of pharmacy of the Mcdi-
val-College of the University of South
Carolina at Charleston.
All members of the association are
visited once in every three years, it
was said.
RODKEY SPEAKS AT CLUB
Prof. Robert Rodkey of the cco-
nomics department and T. Hawley j
Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association last night at'
tended a meeting of the Alumni Club
of Flint at which Professor Rodkey
spoke on "The New Federal Bank-
ing Laws."
PEWRITERS - PORTABLE
NwSeoond-H Rebuilt,
SnUi6Corona, Noiseless,
U=Ierwood Rya, Remington.
x *red,
Stt
314 se state St., Ann Arbor.

the problem ,in the future, it was
announced.
Members of the "specific commit-
tee" to plan the activities of the con-
ference are: Dr. Mabel Rugen, pro-
fessor of women's physical education,
Prof. Jackson Sharman of the physi-
cal education department, Dr. Earl
E. Kleinschmidt, Ann Arbor schools'
physician, Dr. Lloyd R. Gates of the
hygiene department, Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick, social director of the League.
Miss Elizabeth Robinson, supervising
nurse of the Health Service, + and
Prof. Elmer Mitchell,'director of the
Intramural :Building.
Members of the hygiene depart-
ment will act as a "general commit-
tee."
To Compile Current
Literature List Here
The English department has been
permanently assigned the task of
compiling a bibliography on current
literature for the English Journal,
a magazine published by the National
Council of Teachers of English in
Chicago.
Books which have been published
this year will be submitted by pub-
lishing houses and the most import-
ant ones will be selected for short
critical reviews. The value of the
book is to be indicated in the review.
SCHOOL OF NURSING
of YALE UNVERSITY
A Pr ofession for
the C ollege Woina
Thethirty montfs course, providing
anu intensive and varied experience
through the case study ethud,
leads to t1e degree of
Bachelor of Nursing
Two or more years of s' pproved col-
lege work required for admission.
Beginning in 1934 a Bachelor's de-
gree will be re'qui]'ed. A few scholar-
ships ivallable for studeltswith
advanced quahlicatlous.
For catalogue and information
iress:
Tie )ea. .Vie School of Nursing
New Haven, Coninecticut

in high school, they would have been
turned out to be fairly good students.
As a result of this dropping off of
pupils, an increase in crime is vision-
ed a few years hence, by Professor
Carrothers.
Another uasu anaing effect of slash-

'jf-
,II
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FRENC117

SUMMER
SCHOOL

CLASSES
NOW FORMING
STENOTYPY
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
CALCULATOR
DICTAPHONE
SECRETARIAL
TRAINING
Day and Evening Classes
A
Hamilton
Business College
State & WilliamSts,
PHONE 7831
17th Year'

Residential Summer School (co-
educational) in the heart of
French Canada. Old Country
French staff. Only French spok-
en. Elementary. Intermediate,
'Advanced. Certificate or College
Credit. French entertainments,
sight-seeing, sports, etc.
Fee $150, Board and 'Tuition.
June 26-July 29. Write for cir-
cular to Secretary, Residential
French Summer School.
McGILL UNIVERSITY
MONTREAL, CANADA

__._. ., .._........... I

5 0% REDUCTION
in RAILROAD FARES
for Students' Spring Vacation
ONE FARE for ROUND TRIP
in Coaches Only
Tickets may be purchased to many points in the
United States good going and returning on dates
conforming to closing and opening of College. For
further particulars consult railroad ticket agent.
SAVE TIME * TRAVEL BY TRAIN
in SAFETY and COMFORT

_ _ __ _ _ . _ ..h

I.

Visit Your Bank
Before Starting a Trip
Travelers Cheques mean taking your bank vault with you,
because your funds are safe in the form of Travelers
Cheques. N A careful traveler will not leave on a trip with.
out first visiting his bank to arrange for his travel funds,
that is, to change his currency into Travelers Cheques.
Accepted everywhere . . insured against loss or theft .. .
they are the ideal, safe "travel money"
WE HAVE AMERICAN EXPRESS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES

4 Days -May 17,18, 19, 20-,33-6Concerts
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT
( Revised March 25 )
Earl V. Moore......... ..... Musical Director
Frederick Stock .............Orchestra Conductor
Howard Hanson.................Guest Conductor
Eric DeLamarter . Assistant Conductor
Juva Higbee Young People's Conductor
NINA KOSHETZ.............. Soprano
Russian Operatic Prima Donna
GRETE STUECKGOLD . . .........Soprano
Prima Donna, Metropolitan Opera Company
LEONORA CORONA ... ....... .,Soprano
Prima Donna, Metropolitan Opera Company
ROSE BAMPTON .... . ........Contralto
Rising Star, Metropolitan Opera Company
FREDERICK JAGEL ...... . .... . ..Tenor
Metropolitan Opera Company
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS...... Baritone
Chicago Civic Opera Company

CHASE BAROMEO .........
Chicago Civic Opera Company

. Bass

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"

JASCHA HEIFETZ ..T......... .Violinist
World Renown Virtuoso
GUY MAIER .......... Pianist
LEE PATTISON ................Pianist
Distinguished Two-Piano Recitalists
PALMER CHRISTIAN . ........Organist
Distinguished American Performer
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION . .300 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS. 400 Voices
World premiere in concert form, of "MERRY MOUNT"
Conducted hv thecmrnnnr .nw-HoardHannan

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)"11 If r i Ai A T TTXI~ 1v Y), I-rxI --Ai r4Ci T A itNITiV C _I t1 IN

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