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April 04, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M1CHIGAN DAILY

ICHIGAN DAILY l-
t h4

-

ht

vs that they must acquire vision, the
can be realized only through adven-
realm of thought. :You cannot set a
path of quails and expect him to be
riture. The hunter must depart from
ned paths,- he must taste of the haz-
vilderness, where tigers and leopards
countered before he can in fact call
dventurer.
:e the Economics department as an

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_ rc4Pn
.or r. ud. : . ati 1NMsT ..._.... .... .,....,.._. n.,. .1. ...,. u

Pubihsi'Jed every morning except Monday during th
Univrsity yen r and Summer Session by the Board i
C trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THIE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it oz
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail
41.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
a4ANAGING EDITOR...............FRANK B. GILBRE1M
CITY EDITOR.........................KARL SEIFFER'
SPORTS EDITOR....................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR........MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.

(4

S2ORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPOR.TERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G.
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Edwin W. Richardson,
George Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
Jeanette Dugf, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan. Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFP
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON 0. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGED.... .................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.........DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;,
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publicatiorn Robert N.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell' Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billy Griffiths, Catherine Mclenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb.
TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1933
The Large Vote'
Yesterday. ..

by
of
at

O NE ENCOURAGING sign for our
American democracy is exemplified
the unusually large vote yesterday. The use
the ballot is increasing in popular interest
every successive election.

x . Can a student there qualify as an ad-
v anues long as he is bound within the-limits
of ay r s text book? Can. Professor Handman;
sincerely insist on education being an adventure
while his students are deprived of theories in the
field of economics that are shaping and reshap-
ing the destinies of hundred of millions of the
human race? Why not teach a course on com-
nunism, why not teach Marx and Lenin? Are you
afraid that students cannot digest such material
without the risk of being overcome by its con-
vincing propaganda? If so, then your students are
not out for adventure-they are still babies; you
are feeding them on milk bottles, and education is
not an adventure in the realm of thought.
President Ruthven in one of his lectures to a
group of foreign students once said, ."Students
use the words socialism and communism, but
hardly any of them understands the significance
.of these terms." Well I hope it will not be long
before the universities begin to realize and regret
such ignorance on the part of their students.
Having gone that far, I wish to make it plainly
understood I am not a proponent of communism.
I am a builder and not a destroyer. In order to
have a firm building, however, I do recognize
that some destruction must necessarily be had.
Progress here or elsewhere could easily be achieved
along constitutional standards, provided, however;
that those constitutional standards are construed
liberally. But when it comes to the Lenin doc-
trines, the kill-the-rich communism, they are to
me as despicable as those who preach them. In
spite of all this, it must be remembered that
there are other aspects of communism besides
those manifested in the Detroit parks. Those
aspects it is the duty of the Universities to unfold
before the college students.
In conclusion I will again repeat-if students
are to assume the burden of leadership, they
should be afforded the opportunity of basing that
leadership on a fair understanding of the human
thought in its entirety. At least, before Professor
Handman expects them to qualify as adventurers
the limits of one sole economic theory. In order
that they might compare and formulate intelligent
conclusions other theories 'must be made available
to them.
--H. 1. Khalaf...
CAUSES OF THE DEPRESSION
The following survey will probably be of interest
to the campus. It is a summary of the answers
of the senior medical students, 108 in number, to
the question: "What is the Cause of the Present
Depression and Why is it so Severe?" the- question
was totally unexpected and had to be answered
in about five minutes.- It was asked by Professor
Emerson in his course in Medical Jurisprudence
on the first day of the class and before the bank-
ing shake-up. - .
1. Forty-four per cent of the papers were char-
acterized by a lack of definite thought; only one
reason or none were given; or contradictions and
ambiguous statements appeared. The following are
the ideas expressed and the number of times each
appeared. The grouping is arbitrary: .
2. (a) Cyclic inflation of -values or prosper-
ity boom followed by a normal pe-
riodic depression ..................47
(b) Hysteria, fear, loss of confidence,
hoarding .... .......7
( c) Too much attempt to regulate pros-
perity by legislation .......... . .... 2
3. (a) Dishonesty -and stupidity in govern-
menit............................23
(b) Dishonesty and stupidity in finance 12
(c) Lobby legislation for special privilege 12
(d) Private ownership and capitalism .... 5
(e) Foreign Loans . . . . .. . . . .........,. 5
4. (a) W ar . ........ .. . ............. 21
(b) Tariffs . ..........................14
(c) Lack of institutional co-operation ....1
(d) War debts..............8,
(e) Armaments ........................ 3
(f Reparations ....................... 1
5. (a) Lack of economic planning (over-
production)....... .............43
(b) Poor distribution of an adequate
return for work ....................30
(c) Technological advance has out-
stripped social advance .............17
(d) Machinery has replaced labor........7
6. (a) Philosophy and moral standard which
makes exploitation permissible. the
one motive of private profit. Greed.
Lust for personal power. Personal ir-
responsibility ......................11

7. (a) Artificial Urbanization .............. 2
(b) Dumping of foreign goods .......... 2
(c) Immigration and overpopulation ....: 2
N. B. In 44% of the papers there was evidence
of fuzzy thinking or no persistent thought on the
question. Catchword phrases apparently satisfied
a majority of this group of students, Note that
group five has the largest number of answers.
This analysis was made by myself and whilej
admitting its make-shift nature, I assume all re-
sponsibility for the essential accuracy and com-
pleteness of this representation.
-Joseph F. Griggs, '33M.
Town Points
By RANCIV WAGNER

boats running across Lake Michigan to Wisconsin.
It was formerly known as the Toledo-Ann Arbor
Railroad.
It takes 35 minutes at average walking pace to
cross the city at its widest point.
The street census further reveals that Ann Ar-
bor has-Harvard, Cambridge. Oxford and Mich- -
igan, in addition to three Universities and a
College.
The clock in the courthouse here generally runsj
about five minutes fast, although the four faces
do not always agree, varying as much as five min-
utes. The University tower clock runs a minute
and a half slow regularly.
Typographical error in a street sign: "E. Lib-
erity"-Corner of Thompson and Liberty streets.
The city of Toledo, 0., was an oasis for South-
ern Michigan imbibers during the days when
Michigan was dry and Ohio wet. The Ann Arbor
railroad was rushed with business in those days-
men carrying suitcases. Now, the chief article of
transport on the road is fruit.
A sign on W. Liberty Street bears the following
legend: "Carriage Repository,"

SELECTED POEMS.
CHICAGO POEMS.......
CORNHUSKERS.......
SMOKE AND STEEL
SLABS OF SUNBURNT WEST
EARLY MOONS (Poems) -
GOOD MORN!NG AMERICA

THE BOOKIS of
CARL SANDBUG

I

$2.00
$1.75
$1.75
$2.00
1.50
$2.50
3.00

at

2,.,W'SH

BOKSTOR E

" b4°a't.: Ff TL: ;a' :'r3 .x"i '. J. ";_.. C' i:;i.dY.z ..yp, .:. y..':'; ' "t.:. 'r r" _ .
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It was not always so, and one of the greatest
dimiculties before a popular government is to getj
out the vote. There was a day in American his-
tory when political scientists gloomily prophesied
that unless the average voter were stirred out of
his indifference the country would be ruined.
The history of elections in the last ten or fifteen
years, however, shows a remarkable reversal of
this tendency. In each of the elections in which
Harding, Coolidge, Hoover and Roosevelt were
elected president the total national vote was enor-
mously greater than any previous vote on record.
Similar results, though in less degree and more
erratic, have followed in state and local elections.I
Some natural explanations might be offered.
The grant of woman suffrage had a great deal to
do with the immense increases in the last decade,
while political issues of surpassing public interest
have counteracted public indifference. In partic-
ular, the vote on national prohibition yesterday
doubtless had a great deal to do with the size of
the vote.
Allowing for all of these factors, however, one
cannot escape a conviction that as the years go by
our people are taking their votes more seriously
and that the strenuous program of patriotic or-
ganizations in behalf of voting has not been en-
tirely in vain.
Campus Opiion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon retue-t. Contributors are
asked to be brief, cmntluinj; them~selves to less than
300 words if possible.
THE SPRING PARLEY-
AN IMPRESSIVE EVENTI
Before discussing the particular angle which
interests me most, let me say that the Spring
Parley stands in my mind as the most impressive
event undertaken by faculty and student members
during this current year. At last the students have
been afforded the great opportunity of catching
a personal glimpse of these intellectual giants
whom they before had merely regarded as offi-
cers of the daily classroom routine. The thunder-
ing passion of Professor Weaver of the English
department, the clear vision of Professor Muyskens,
the conservative skepticism of Professor Handman
of the Economics department have created imagesj
in my mind never to be forgotten-Give us more
Spring Parleys in the future.
Now coming to the main theme which may at
first sight seem as a criticism of Professor Hand-
man, I will begin with this proposition: Professor
H-andman advocated and maintained that uni-
versity education should be regarded as an adven-
ture; that is to say, the function of education is to
excite the student's curiosity leaving it for him
to determine the course of action or the calling

Screen Reflections
Fotr stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"42ND STREET"
AN EXCELLENT MUSICAL-
,OMEDY PICTURE
Julian Marsh..........Warner Baxter
Peggy Sawyer ............ Ruby Keeler
Jimmy ..... . .............Dick Powell
Dorothy Brock ...... . ,.....Bebe Daniels
Pat Denning .............. George Brent
Abner Dillon ............... Guy Kibbee
Anytime Annie .........,Ginger Rogers
According to the advertising blurbs this picture
"is the most important entertainment event since
Warner Brothers gave you talking pictures." And
to those who like singing, dancing -and legs in a
picture, it probably is. The story follows the pro-
duction of a musical comedy from the first call for
tryouts to the first night. It tells of a chorus girl
(Ruby Keeler) who got her big chance when the
star (Bebe Daniels) broke her ankle.
Warner Baxter is excellent as the hard-boiled
director who nearly works himself to a nervous
breakdown. Ruby Keeler is a marvelous tap-
dancer as well as being thoroughly entrancing in
her role as the little girl who captures the hearts
of the first night audience.
There are four tuneful songs from this show. In
case you are not already familiar with them, they
are -"Forty-Second Street," "Shuffle Off to Buf-
falo," "You're Getting To Be a Habit With Me,"
and "I'm Young and Healthy."
This picture is undoubtedly very superior in its
type. If you like the type, don't miss it.
-B. S.
-00-
"KAMERADSCHAFT" OPENS AT THE
LYDIA MENDELSSQHN -
The Art Cinema League's presentation of the
all-talking German picture, "Kameradschaft"
opened in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre last
night. Directed by G. W. Pabst, the picture tells of
the rescue of a group of French Miners -trapped I
in a mine by their German comrades, who come
across the international boundary line to their
aid.
Extolling the virtues of comradeship .and illus-
trating the flimsiness of political boundaries, this
picture is one of the best that has been brought
to this country from Germany in ecent years.
STARS
__& STRIPES
C By Karl Seiff
Detroit's Mayor Murphy says that the situation
there is not appreciated either at home or in
Washington. This is -a heck of a time to be going
around looking for appreciation, anyway, Mr.
Murphy.
Jimmie Walker, who wrote the old song, "Will
You Love Me in December as You Love Me in
May?" is about to marry again, apparently on the
theory that no woman can expect a man to hang
around much later than the first of August just
to find out the answer to a silly song.
'* ..* *
CHANGES IN U. S. BANKING
TO BE SUBJECT OF COURSE
--Headline.
So it's got to the point where you .just take
it for granted, eh?
* * %
A student at a Mt. Pleasant college has sent the
dean several bushels of alfalfa in part payment of
his tuition, which seems like taking a pretty big
chance just for a little joke.
* * *
SLY WINK DEPT.
"The Free Press stands out boldly in all its
historic traditions as the great Thunderer of
the Middle Border. That is the slogan I wanted
Mr. Stair to put on his masthead but he de-
murred because of his innate modesty."
-Chase S. Osborn, quoted in
the Detroit Free' Press.

POTATO FACE.
ROOTABAGA STORIES:
ROOTABAGA PIGEONS.
AMERICAN SONGBAG (Conpiled)
Abraham Lincoln-The Prairie Years y
ABE LINCOLN GROWS UP
MARY LINCOLN, Wife and wi i'

TIRED?

"RED~
-ot A. 'K

$1.50
$2.00
$2.00
57.50
$10.00
$2.50
$3.00

1

Need a
Book?
Short
of Cash?
USE
A
Adt
call1 AL
The Ad-Taker
At 2-1214
and let him
arranige your
Swcap

110, HUM ... another day, an-
other dollar. But why, let it put
you in a state of vertical collapse,
when the n:earest campus eating
place has the best pick-me-up
awaiting your command?
It's Shredded Wheat, the food
that's VITALLY DIFFERENT,
that puts the spring in your ste p.
Some folks call it "energy by the
bowlful." And it is--for Shredded
Wheat is whole wheat, the one
cereal grain that's packed with
proteins, ca-rhol adira t s, minerals
aill vitami1s , Al ' these vital, life-
susLai cig elmcients-nothing add-

When you see Niagara Falls on the
package, yo KNOW you have
Shredded Wh5at.

ed, nothing taken away-come
to you in Shredded Wheat; With
just the righ-t amount of bran,
measured foryou by Nature.
You'll like the taste. Millions
say they do. Have it served any
way you like--with milk or cream,
fresh or prcServed fruit. It will
even put new life in your pocket-
book ... it's a lot offood for a little!

WHEAT

A .' uet. of

NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY "Uneeda akerV"

I '

,.

4

0

This!

'
,
,
,
,

Main street is the- only thoroughfare that-passesI * c *
through Ann Arbor from city limit to city limit. CLASSIFIED AD: Man, exp
forked sticks, locating water, etc.
Street names in Ann Arbor include-Trees: Say, if it works send him aro
Cehar, Elm, Apple, Evergreen,. Hickory, Willow, it on beer.
Ma p1ewood, Oak, Pinewood, Rose, Peach, Pear, * * *
Plui, Walnut. There is -also an OrChard and a NATURE NOTI

perienced use,
und and we'll

of
try

It's not difficult to use Q telephone
and you can find lost notebooks or
rent a room as easily . w . Simply

"I was fishing with a pole and line in a marsh

I

I

I

I.

III A I I - A _ I -1-I _I- - - - A * i- I- I _I

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