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April 02, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-04-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Federal slate for adequate control of the sale of
lquors.

I ___________ I

Town Points
By FRANCIS WAGNER

_ -
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IL

Published every morning except Monday' during the
University year and Summer Session by. the Hoard inl
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to It or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Enteredat the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Mchitgan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier,$ 1.00; by mail,
,,.50. During regular school year by terrier, .$4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor; Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, Ne* York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chieago.
EDITORIAL STAFF.
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.............PRANK I3. COILBREttl
CITY ED IO ..............,...... KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR..................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR... . .. .MARGARET O'BRI1EN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SJdORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis. Ball, Charles .0.
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Edwin W. Richardson,
George Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, EleanorB. Blum, Ellen
Sane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy DIs-hman,
Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret *D. Phalan, Marjorie
Wester''.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214'
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON'C. VEDDEE
CRE,'DIT MANAGER. ....HARiRY BEG LSE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER....... DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, arafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schaacke; Cir-
cultion, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert .
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen. Cleve-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroynmson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Huni, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Axgler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman. Doris
Gimmy, Billy Gxriffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb. y
SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1933
Won11 d It Be
A Sensible Economy?. ..

The Theatre
CARL SANDBURC--.
AN APPRECIATION
Although Carl Sandburg's fame as a poet has
in the last five years somewhat dwindled, he is
likely in the next five to be restored to a position
in American literature which he deserves and
which he will enjoy, I think, permanently. The
acclaim he received in the early 'twenties from
critics such as William Rose Benet and Carl Van
Dorin in America, Rebecca West in England and,
from many French critics, was perhaps due to the
temporary vogue for "authentic and indigenous
voices." This attitude, though perhaps overstressed
at the time, is sounder than the fake classicism
of the hastily sophisticated youngish men who
have succeeded Sandburg in the esteem of critics.
Sandburg's poetry is marred, in the opinion of
some of these critics, by the tendency to orate in
verse on social wrongs, but I am not convinced
that oratory has no legitimate place in'poetry. As
a Scandinavian of the lower middle class, I admit
a feeling of uncritical sympathy and admiration
for Sandburg long before he was accepted by the
official critics, and I can testify that many men
who had not the historical imagination to appre-
ciate Dante or Milton, but who had native intel-
ligence enough to resent the flub-dub of Eddie
Guest, felt themselves stirred by Sandburg's hon-
est and eloquent expression of their own experi-
ences and emotions. This representative quality
in Sandburg is a securer basis for a permanent
reputation than the current fad for exquisites
such as T. S. Eliot, who, though he expresses bril-
liantly the experiences of a limited number of un-
usual people, is at present enjoying the uncom-
prehending admiration of many a dull intellec-
tual snob both in and out of college.
For .Sandburg is a representative poet of Amer-
ica speaking for a large number of our people.
He has been called, unfortunately, the "Chicago
Poet" by those who know only one of his earlier
poems. His claim to being American is justified
not only by the wide scope of such poetry as
that in "Slabs of the Sunburnt West" and "Good
Morning, America," but also by his biography of
Lincoln, our most representative American hero,
and by the "American Song-Bag" which should be
in every American home where bridge and radio
have not taken the joy out of life. Mr. Sandburg,
whenever he appears on the platform, sings some
of these folk-songs gathered in the South, North,
East and West, and every time I hear him I re-
capture some of the delight I felt fifteen years ago
when I first heard him and his guitar.
-N. E. Nelson.
Screen RefleCtions
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.

Subsequent to a recent item about Leon Czo-
golz, McKinley assassin, we learn that not only he
but also Charles Guiteau, the man who shot Pres-
ident Garfield, attended Ann Arbor High School.
However, neither of the two graduated.
A grocer on East William Street displayed a
sign in front of his store: "Williams St. Grocery."
When he put up a second sign he had apparently
learned the name of the street for thereon the
name is correct.
By dialing a certain number in Ann Arbor you
may be connected directly with the governor's
office in Lansing.
No street in Ann Arbor has been named 13th,
proving that the early settlers must have been
superstitious.
Musical Events
PALMER CHRISTIAN
IN BACH RECITAL
Toccata, Adagio and Fugue
Siciliano
Chorale: "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring"
Chorale Prelude : "In Thee Is Joy"
Prelude and Fugue in E minor
Chorale Prelude: "I call to Thee"
Prelude in D
Sonatina from the Cantata: "God's Time is Best"
Sinfonia to the Cantat: "I Stand With One Foot
in the Grave".
Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Palmer Christian, University organist, will pre-
sent the above program of the works of Johann
Sebastian Bach at 4:15 p. m. today in Hill Audi-
torium.
It is a popular convention to think of "Fugue,"
double "fortes," and a lot of energetic pedal work
when the name of Bach is mentioned in connec-
tion with the organ, but this is just as erroneous
as a lot of the other impressions that have been
handed down to us. Bach could laugh as well as
pray, and although always characterized by his
sincerity, he was far more human than one is ac-
customed to consider the simple and devout "Kap-
pelmeister" of Leipzig. Today's program might be
considered a character sketch of this composer
ranging as it does from the brilliant gayety of the
Toccata in C, to the massive nobility of the "Ca-
thedral" Prelude and Fugue in E minor, and in-
cluding the Sonatina from "God's Time Is Best,"
of which Mendelssohn says, "It is a longe time
since I have been so touched by anything as by
this Sonatina. I could not help thinking of Bach's
solitary position, his pure, mild and vast power,
and the transparency of its depths."}.
Bach was harmonic as well as melodic-he could
write the tremendous Passacaglia and Fugue in C
minor whichs employs etery known device of
counterpoint, but he could also do such cantabile
passages as the melody of the Adagio of the Toc-
cota in C, and that of the Siciliano in a su-
premely beautiful way.

ERNCLEA

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and that meaning is QUALITY AND SERVICE

YOUR EASTER CLEANING

Should not be done in a hurry and it is not at the
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WE ARE FOR ANN ARBOR-Our community interests are in
Ann Arbor, its students, faculty and citizens.
N'K ON THE SWISS We will not be over-crowded to
capacity with the oncoming Easter business.
STOP HOARDING THOSE SOILED CLOTHES

Send Them to Us

--Phone 4191

15 PERCENT
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I

209 S. 4th Avenue (opposite Montgomery Ward & Co.) 705' N. University (next door to A. A. Savings Bk.)
C.- H. SCHROEN FRANK P. HALL ERWIN W. SCHROEN
HEADQUARTERS FOR ENOZ MOTH SPRAY SERVICE

rT HE FAR-REACHING evils of the
I proposed cut in the University ap-
propriation have been enumerated and are before
the public. It is next in order to consider what
the measure would mean to the Michigan tax-
payers for whose benefit it is designed.
Taxable property in this state has at present
an assessed valuation of about six and a half
billion dollars. The proposed economy would
amount to something more than $2,000,000. The
benefit to taxpayers, therefore would be less than
35 cents per $1,000 of taxable property.
This means, for instance, that the average $5,-
000 property in Michigan would be granted a little
more than a dollar and a half tax reduction-at
the expense of the virtual destruction of one of
the greatest universities in the world.
Michigan is a great state. Its name and its fame
have justly spread far beyond the confines of its
own borders. In the very forefront of its glories
is its University, an institution acknowledged as
a leader by every educator in the world. The
present issue involves a choice between continuing
it or adopting an economy that will mean just 30
cents per thousand dollars' worth of property to
the taxpayers.
In utmost respect to the Legislature we voice
our fervent hope that the cut that has been pro-
posed will not be made.
A Chance To Start Over
With A Clean Slate . .
T OMORROW, voters all over the
State of Michigan will cast their
ballots on the repeal of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment by voting to ratify or reject the Twenty-
First Amendment. The Twenty-First Amendment
provides for the repeal of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment and also authorizes Congress to. prohibit
shipments of intoxicating liquors into states which
have local prohibition.
Under the method set up by the Michigan Leg-
islature, Michigan voters are really voting directly
on the question of repeal. They will vote for dele-
gates to a state convention which will ratify or
reject the new amendment. The candidates nom-
inated have been, in most cases, the leaders of the
repeal and prohibition causes, respectively. The
matter of personalities does not enter into the
question, any more than it does in the election of
Presidential electors. The candidates are pledged
to vote for or against ratification, and thus record
the vote of their constituencies.
In Washtenaw County, Nathan Potter, county
commander of the Crusaders, and Lquis Reiman,
prominent dry leader, are the two candidates. Be-
lieving as we do in the repeal of the Eighteenth
Amendment. we strongly urge the voters of this
county to elect Mr. Potter to the state convention.
it is not, as we have said before, a matter of per-
sonalities. But Mr. Potter stands for a principle
which the voters of Washtenaw County, of the
second Congressional district, and the whole state
of Michigan overwhelmingly endorsed in the No-
vember clection-the repeal of Prohibition.
Voters who are confused about the many bal-
lots should remember that, in November, the ques-

-- --------

AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
"KAMERADSCHAFT"
The change in Franco-German relations from
a seething post-war hatred to a frienndly cama-
raderie induced by mutual distress, is portrayed
in "Kameradschaft," Art Cinema League talkie
which will be shown Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. A hor-
rible mine disaster is the medium which brings
the two European nations, enemies for four years,
to work arm-in-arm to rescue their stricken com-
rades.
"Kameradschaft" might almost have been an
American product. The transitions do not show
the continental tendency to jumpiness, and there
is concerted action shown on the part of the pro-
ducers towards achieving their portrayal.of com-
radeship. The sound, which is about 75 per cent
French and the rest German, is fairly intelligible
to the student of lang-uages and the photography
is consistently good. English subtitles clear up
little points that may bother those who have stuck
close to the English tongue.
The belching flames which are the forerunner
of dust explosions, poison gas fumes, and mashed
water pipes, make an exciting sequence. Other
subterranean scenes, including those showing the
searching parties tapping pipes to locate their lost
brothers and those showing the devoted grand-
father in search of his grandson, are of equal
interest.
"Kameradschaft" teaches its little lesson aboutf
foolish post-war animosities in an unobtrusive
way, and manages to be highly entertaining in a
more un-subtle fashion.
Added attractions: Screen Reflections hadn't
realized until now that Mickey Mouse equals Art
with a capital A, but he evidently does. Mr. Mouse,
in "The Duck Hunt" is the star of an appealing
cartoon in which the hound sniffs at trees, the
ducks make unkind noises with their bills (that's
right, we think), and Mickey himself is dragged'
over pointed housetops-the audience shivers at
this last. But maybe its all art with a small a.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"PERFECT UNDERSTANDING"
MARITAL DIFFICULTIES IN
A HIGH SOCIETY SETTING
Judy .................. Gloria Swanson
Nick ........ ..........Laurence Oliver 1
George ................ Michael Farmer
Kitty ................. Genevieve Tobin
Stephany ............Nora Swineburne
Gloria Swanson's first picture in over a year is
not a conspicuous success. In the first place, the
actress is cast as a sweet, young, unsophisticated
girl, a type of role that she has outgrown. In the
second place, the sound recording is somewhat
squawky, reminiscent of the first talking pictures.
In the third place, the play is not particularly
clever.
Cast and produced in England, this picture in-
troduces some new characters to American thea-
tre-goers. Laurence Oliver is particularly success-
ful in the role of Nick, Judy's husband. He gives

DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS ARE INEXPENSIVE

STARS

-Kathleen Murphy.

__&STRLPES I
-- By Karl Seiffert
Friday, the thirty-first
Dear Uncle Karl:
Back again, unkie. But what difference does it
make to you who I am? I'm free, white, and al-
most twenty-one-one of the oppressed student
body who so far has been just a mite too sly for
Rea, Fisher, and Henchmen, Inc.-
I still favor the class of '36. And speaking of
class, here's
MY CHOICE FOR THE BLUE RIBBON
From the halls of Delta Gamma
To the doors of KKG,
There are lots of dolls to choose from,
Lots of dates for you and me;
Of course we must include the Pi Phis,
And the Theta cuties too,
Not to mention many others
Who in a pinch might also do.
Well, you can have all those, by gosh-
I want a Mosher-Jordan frosh!
-Christopher.
We give up, Christopher. You can keep your
doggone old anonymity. And by the way, anony-
mity is NOT one of those flowers that blooms in
the early spring.
*I * *'
CLASSIFIED AD: Any radio set repaired, $1;
anywhere; no play, no pay.
Go 'way.
S. W. DEPT.
"Every time I want to make a change I run
into obstacles. I find some law or some ob-
structionist in the way. But we'll get the job
done before the year is over, if we have pa-
-Governor Comstock.
HUNTS SNAKES TO PAY
HIS COLLEGE TUITION
-Headline.
Oh, an exam proetor, eh?
A device has been invented which will cry
"thief" if anybody tries to break in, or "fire" if
the house bursts into flames. What we need now
is something that will holler, "Sorry, but I'm out
of work myself," when there's a panhandler at
the door.

y k A 1 4 f

*1

Should Auld Acquaintance Bc Forgot?

Of Course Not!

BE

SCOTCH

rhis is the last chance to
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