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March 25, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-25

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THE MJ14ICH:1IGtA N T)D 1 _,Y

N DAILY

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRE3SS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of al news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited hi this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mal,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier. $4.00; by
trail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,.,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925~
MANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR...........................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR.................. .JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDTOR.............MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR........MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Bali, Charles G.
B3arndt, Arthur W. Cars;tenis, Ralph G. Coulter, Williain
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett. George M. Hlmes, Edwin W. Richardson.,
George Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
Barara Bates, Marjorie E. Bec. ,Eleanor B. Blain, Ellen
Jane Cooley,. Louise Crdall, Dorothy Dishnian,
Joanette Dulf, Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
B3USINESS STAFF'
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.................BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER....,.................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publication, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamfn, Gordon Boylan, Allen Clove-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroyinson, Fred Hertriclk,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Ginuny, Billy Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-.
fried, Virginia McComb.
SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1933

before the dance. So successful was the party that
the Slide Rule committee decided to follow suit
and was equally successful, having a sell-out
after the tickets had been on sale for only two
days.
The popularity of these two dances clearly
shows that the campus will no longer pay high
prices to dance for a few hours to the music
of a famous band. Ben Bernie, who played for
the J-Hop, hardly drew enough people to pay the
expenses. It would therefore be wise for those
who tre planning dances in the future to profit
by the success of our last two parties and reduce
their prices to a level within the reach of the ma-
jority of students.
Col uibia s
PmChild
THE SPECTATOR, bad boy of the
collegiate press and problem child
of Columbia University, is in trouble again. This
time an iavestigating committee has submitted a
report on the policies of the editors, and its
recommendation, that there be a drastic, change
in the manner in which the editors of the Spec-
tator carry out, in practice, their guiding prin-
ciples, has been approved by a' student board.
The student board has asked Dr. Nicholas Mur-
ray Butler, president of Columbia, to make use
of his power to curb the Spectator and recom-
mends that:
"The Managing Board of Spectator be informed,
that, in our opinion, Spectator might be improved
both as a newspaper and a critical force by a
more careful inquiry into the facts of situations
which it proposes to improve, by a more courteous
treatment of opposed points of view, and less fre-
quent use of sensational headlines and editorial
invective."
If the Spectator is purposely or otherwise gar-
bling facts, we certainly feel that it should be
reprimanded, and we agree with the criticism of
the student board. The editors should certainly be
sure of the facts before an attempt to deprecate
or advocate improvement on any situation.
However, before any student board attempts to
dictate to the editors the sort of headlines that
should appear in their paper, it should make sure
that it is in possession of the facts. Personally,
we have never noticed anything sensational about
the headlines of the Spectator. We question very
seriously whether the student board is a compe-
tent judge of sensational headlines. In fact, after
reading its dictum, we feel safe in saying that it
is not.
As far as the more courteous treatment of the
opposed "points of view is concerned, we agree
with a comment which appeared in the Williams
Record:
"It must be remembered that when undergrad-
uates' are agitating' for a change, they must as-
sume the attitudes of suppliants for favors-
young men asking older men to be kind and make
this or that alteration. It is necessary therefore.
that the suppliant adopt as strong an attitude as
possible; so that his case will receive a fair hear-
in g . "
We admit that the Spectator is a bit radical;
but we feel that a college publication, like a
metropolitan publication, loses influence and cil-
culation when its facts are consistently garblec
and when its editorial comments are unfair. Cen-
r sors of the collegiate press should remember tha
circulation figures and prestige are a sufficieni
e force, over a long period of time, to regulate a
e paper's editorial tone.
Our advice to the Columbia student board is
, to adopt a laissez-faire policy toward the Spec-
tator, and if the problem child is cutting u;
s again, the student body as a whole will bring
s enough pressure to bear to make the bad bo3
a behave.
if the Spectator is to be censored, we urge th
board to have it censored by a group that know
, something about journalism. There is no point ii
ruining one of the few remaining real studen
r newspapers.

Musical Events
ROY HARRIS -
ON AMERICAS EMOTIONAL RhYThM

CAMPUS SOCIETY

a

;? ",,t
4 *7 AkII 'l &A9-ii

A weather-beaten farmer with a corrugated 'A
forehead and a mumbling drawl --a person whom
it is much easier to picture in overalls than a 'xv Gti- i1l 1F
tuxedo--a man whose. personality is as colloquial
as his speech-such a one is Roy Harris on first
appearance. But as he talks on, sell consciousness Few, socialailgairs are paen-t this
disappears in sincerity, and awkwardness becomes week-end, although election of ori-
earnestness. Roy Harris is an intensely interested prs initiations, and several informal
and interesting person. Music to him is a vital ad sororities. Many members are
thing-not something, to be veneered over the spending the week-end out of town..
surface along with all the other decorations of a CHI PSI
higher education. Chi Psi fraternity is entertaining
The impulse to make music comes with the its National Fraternity Visitor, Mr.
first awareness of consciousness, he says, and the Jackson Chaille, for a few days.
idea of "one hundred, forty million of our own HI KAPPA PHI,.
seats of consciousnes! spread from the Atlantic An informal closed party was given
clear to the Pacific" is more intoxicating to him by Pi Kappa Phi last night. The
than any amount of European super sophistica- guests were Verna Nelso, Wakefield;
tion. His conception of the science of music is Ethyl Uitti, South Range; Gertrude
abstract, but his idea of the significance of music Kuivenen, Ypsilanti; Mary Gray,
is decidedly social and practical. "America," he Ypsilanti; Mildred Lepisto, Ypsilanti:
said, "is not a single countly, but a sectional Lillian Britton, Ypsilanti; Connie
country." This patriotism of his, which is almost Bridge, Kresge; Betty Bridge, Kresge;
counry.th~hs ptrioismof hs, hicVera Newsrough, '35; Charlotte John-
nineteenth century in its turgid, Whitmanish eaNwruh 35 hrot on
son, Spec.; Signe Johnson, '34; Betty
phrasings, is the basic inspiration of his compo- Merrell, '35; Audrey Bates, Grass
sitions. Roy Harris is American and proud of it, sake; Mary Gertrude Pearsall, '34;
with a scorn for all our European adaptations. Evelyn Bohnet, '34; Leola Max, '34;
"We are not a musical people at all but just a Maretta Martinek, '35SM. Prof. Rod-
well paying public to European commodities, la- erick McKenzie and Mrs. McKenzie
dled out through box office establishments." and Mr. and Mrs. Jed Maebius were
Our "conception of glorifying the materialistic" also present.
has made us so, but, if we do not have tradi- PHI BETA DELTA
tions, we can at least have hopes-and these he Detroit Alumni of Phi Beta Delta
finds, quite uniquely, in our improvising "croon- will entertain members of the chap-
ers," the ingenious orchestrations of Ferdy Grofe, ter at a stag banquet in Detroit Sat-
and the "wonderful plasticity of the tuba player" urday evening.
of our jazz bands. He says, "I hold that the PI LAMBDA PHI
rhythm of American emotion is quite distinct The following officers were recently
from that of Europe: the whole trouble with nine- elected by Pi Lambda Phi: Harold R
teenth century music is that it has taught us to Schmidt, president; Jay Rosenberg
feel music as divided by bar lines rather than in vice-president; Robert Kositchek
large forward curves." The characteristic which scretary; Herbert Greenstone. maste]
Harris finds the most important in our modern of work.
"popular" art is this same "plasticity of the mel- PSI OMEGA
odic line," a vitality of self-expression which has tiOeof th e nglo hers:aFed
been finding its parallel in architecture, in science, nric Oles, '34D, president; Ernest Dun
and to some extent in the contemporary novel, nigan, '34D, vice-president; Dougla:
but in respect to music, only lies fertilizing in our Walter, '34D, sceretary, and Stewar
"jazz." He prophesies, however, an artistic future Carr, '34D, treasurer.
which will be achieved through the excellence of TRIANGLE
our school systems when America will truly be- Triangle will hold formal inititaio
come "musical." services Saturday for Henry Va
When the Art Cinema League forgot the "ci- Welde, '34. James Bill, '34, and Ray
nema" and concentrated on the "art," it started mond Maloy, '34.
something that one may hope will become tradi- ALPHA EPSILON PHI
tional in Ann Arbor. The appearance of Roy Har- Mrs. L. J. Navran, of Kansas City
ris should be only the beginning of a series of il- MO., is visting her daughter, Jacque
lustrated lectures by other modern artists-per- line, for the next few days. Mr. an
, haps a painter, a sculptor, or a poet, as well as Mrs. Louis Fishman are also her
a composer-a series which would be a distinctive ter. Heila. Beverly Stark, '33, ha
contribution to the artistic, educational and so- gone to Detroit' for Saturday an
cial institutions of this city. Sunday.
--Kathleen Murphy LPHA DLTA PI

H s ave Ptrois List
velsShedu FeL

itgton, D. C.. to attend the spring
convention of the American Chemi-
cal Society. Miss Burwell will pre-
sent a paper at the meeting.j Pa
A rushing supper will be given Tea
Sunday night at the Sorority. Spring in t
lowers and yellow tapers will orna- were
nment the table. ike
-cuba
Evelyn Beck of Cleveland, .O, is
visiting here for the week-end. Miss Ti
Beck is a member of another chapter Dr.
Sof Alpha De'ta Pi. and
A. B
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA AMrs
Alpha Gamma Delta will entertain 'Miss
with an informal radio party Satur- Bac
day night. Eth
Several members of I he sorority Pi
have left town for the week-end. add
Lucille Rugg. '33, went to Detroit, tain
Arline Howard. '33, to Dearborn, and celel
Mary Alexander, '34, to Battle Creek. men
ALPHA XI DELTA
Mary H. Tyre, '32, and Joye June
Ludke, '32, both of 'Detroit. attended
the opening performance of the
'Junior GirlsPlay Wednesday evening.
Among those girls spending the M
week-end in Detroit are Ruth Birds- Hal:
eye, '33Ed., Jeanne Reed .,'33, and 000
Winifred Arthur, '34SM. "Be
DELTA OMICRON p
Delta Omicron. musical sorority, p. n
Nill " at uAi t hic f n .n with a

irons and patronesMsa for the
'VO C'Tai'ef to be d April 1
he main balroom ol ilC Leaguw
announced 'today by Pariab
S', assistant airman of th
hose who have been invited armu
Nrathan Sinai and Mrs. Sinai, Mi
Mrs. Robert Hall, ia en ,loseph
ursley and Mrs. Bursb'y. lii'. and
itto Ge, Den Alice Lloy
Ort, G oae cn
Jeannette Perry, M's. Byri
her, Miss Eh'lin Stevenson, Miss
ll PicCormick, and W. B. Rca.
ans are going ahead for further
[tions to the program of enter-
mont which will feature campus
rities. Other committee appoint-
ts will be made soon.
Whgrde RooLeGoe Su
[otion Pictures: Michigan, "The
Lh Naked Truth"; Majestic, "20-
Years in Sing Sing"; Wuerth,
yond the Rockies."
lays: "Love on the Run," 8:15
m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
xhibits: Women as Authors, Gen-
Library; Leather Book Bindings,
liam Clements Library; Alpha
ha Gamma Travelling Exhibit,
dergraduate Room, League; Stu-
t Art Exchange, Hostess Room,
gue; Persian Architecture Photo-
phs. Architecture Building; Mod-
Catalan Painting, West Gallery,
mni Memorial Hall.
~anccs. Informal dancing, 9 o
m., League grill; informal dancing.
. m., Union blro.

-1

win eneran m15a erau woo
y rushing tea at the home of Mrs. Wal-
ter Maddock. The program will in-
clude several violin selections byj
Mona Hutchines, ',4SM. They are
r "Gavotte" by Goffec, "Cradle Song"

I
t

by Hauser. "Romance Opus No. 44'"
- by Rubenstein, "The Old Refrain"
by Chrysler, "Old Irish Air" by Faw-
-yer, and "Indian Love Song" by
Lawrence.
4 Betty Walz, '35SM, will play some
pieces on the piano, which include
"Sonata" by Haydep, "Romance" by
Siblief, "Prelude" by Chopin, and
"The Eagle" by McDowell.
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMIA
Katherine Serrin,. '32, Owosso,
Mich., is a guest at Kappa Kappa
, Gamma this week-end.
- Those who are spending the week-
d end at their homes are Isabelle Kan-
i-TYPEWRI TING
s M 24 F O G<R API 1 I
d Fr-cpy an neatly done a
our owm sho 'by etent
'6.rtors a =aerate rates.
,n 0 bDORR1 L L,
-, 31 a 5 St., Ann Arbor.

eral
Wil
Alp
Un
den
Lea
gra;
ern
Alu
D
12
9p

ter, '35, and May Alice Frederick,
'33, both of Grosse Pointe, and Dor-
othy Bunco, '33, Detroit.
SIGMA KAPPA
The seniors of Sigma Kappa are
entertaining the juniors with a
spread tonight.
100 ENGRAVED CARDS
and PLATE $2.25
- Any " tyle -
]DAVS & OIIINGEIt
109-111 East Washington St.
Phone 8132 Second Floor
}-

Studentss-Just Humans
After All.
T HERE ARE TWO theories at pres-
ent receiving wide consideration
which concern the status of the average college
student. The one is advanced by educators and
self-appointed directors of young men and women
who declare that undergraduates are catapulting
downward at 'the most critical period of their
lives. They strive to improve student morals and
demand extreme application to study. They ar
the proponents of regulations so strict as to be
unfit for college men and women.
The other theory is held by the average layman
who has a roseate picture of student existence
To him college is a .succession of halcyon week,
and months given over to recreation and clas,
dodging. "Have a good time while you're in
school," is his owl-like comment, "for tomorrow
you have to work for a living."
Both of these theories are far from the fact
Reformers may have grounds for their conten-
tions in some instances, but time has proved thei:
estimations of the worth of the next generatior
to have been wrong in general. The average lay
man overlooks all honest endeavor in his vision
of irresponsible days of play for a youthful few
The facts of the situation are familiar to ever:
thinking student. In the first place, the increas
ingly hard' to solve problem of finances ha
forced responsibility upon all students who wouli
remain in college. Their recreations, mainl:
sports, are not costly. Social activities daily be
come less and less dependent upon money. Th
hours spent in relaxation are no greater thar
those spent by any normal, healthy individua
nor do they breed irresponsibility.
Secondly, students are at multiple cross road
in their self-development. In classes they are face
with the question of which professorial dicta an
worth retaining and which are better forgotten
Before them constantly is the' problem of choos,
ing a vocation or of revaluating their chosen on
Around them some students make swifter progres
and others lag behind. Is the excessive work re
quired to keep up with the leaders worth while
If mediocrity in school means a mediocre lift
why study at all?
Finally,, aside from educational problems an
material difficulties, the thinking undergraduat
for the first time is recognizing his social obliga
tions and in turn is calling upon society to mee
its reciprocal debts. He delays marriage for year
in order to secure independence, only to find tha
an unstable economic world denies this to every
one. He considers the rights of others and suffer
He asserts his own and is maligned.
It is time that students ceased to be regarde
as human nature in an extreme form, either con
venient for laboratory research, or undeservin
of intelligent consideration. The undergraduat
like everyone else, has his problems. He is bein
educated to help him solve them. Unwanted inter
ference and off-color representations of his lif
will ultimately contribute nothing to his wel
being.
Lower Priced Parties,
And Sell-Outs...

'

Cornelia Burwell, social chairma
of Alpha Delta Pi, has gone to Wash

Editorial Comment

I

._.._._ : _.___. _ _____, _ a

i

CHANGING THE DATE
OF INAUGURATION
Now it is the weather bureau that joins in ap-
plauding the new amendment that changes future
presidential inaugurals from March 4 to Jan. 20.
The shift forward may help the meteorologists
to meet a problem that is thrust at them quad-
rennially-when thousands of visitors gathered in
Washington for the-inauguration turn blandly to
the weather bureau and demand a bright day.
-Christian Science Monitor.
The trousers tfad was short-lived at the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma. When a co-ed appeared in
them Dean Edna McDaniel ordered her to put on
a dress, then issued a general order that women
would not be allowed to wear trousers on the
campus. -The Depauw

n
r_
is
V.
.y
-S
a
le
is
d
ye
11.
-
e
SS
d
e
et
Ts
-t
e.
d
e
'-
te
rs-
-
s.
1-

Town Points
xr ,

'By FRANCIS WAGNER
Of the old bar-Trooms popular in the pre-Prohi-
bition days,- today: Freddy Haas' is operating as
a cafetelia; Joe Parker's is padlocked; Larry
Damm"S; the Barrel House, and the Midway are
no snore; the' Orient is a pool hall; Freddy
Brown's is a lunchroom; the St. James is a
hotel; Seagert's and Frey's are serving near beer
in the old atmosphere, swinging doors, brass rail,
and everything.,
Ypsilanti is older than Ann Arbor. There are
two stories about the origin of the name Ypsi-
lanti; one that the town was named after a gen-'
eral in the Greek revolution going on at the time
of the founding, and' the other that it took the
name of a local Indian chief.
Among the famous personalities who got their
start here are Howard Coffin, auto magnate who
enitertained two presidents at 'his island home off
the Carolina coast; Frank McIntyre, actor; and
Lewis James of the Revelers.
Howard Coffin drove one of the first automo-
biles used-in Ann Arbor and got a big laugh from
the local'boys. Today, Coffin is one of the wealth-
iest men in the country due to his early interests
in the motor industry.
The 1932-33 edition of "Who's Who in America"
lists 150 Ann Arbor citizens. Only 16' of these are
not connected with the University.
Along with Joe Parker's and the Orient, Mich-
igan alumni remember Tuttle's, first located on
State and later on Mayndrd St. Tuttle used to
give the students' unlimited credit and received
checks on accounts years after the students had
graduated.
Five houses were removed on Church and North
U when the East Engineering building was con-

STARS

I

ro

.
I

&

STIPE S

YE L
FIRST METHODIST HILLELIO
EPISCOPA L W ESL EY H ALL FONATO
(br. E0, 'UnIv. Ave. iad Oalantd
C H U RC H ~ v Blakeman, Director Dr. ier'nad Hedier, l')retor
State and Watshlnton Str 'ets
*
Ministcrs 9:30 A.M. - JESUS~ MO'IIVE" Giw't'
Frederick 13. Fisher with the DireCtor. i1 A&VI --gular Sunday muoing
Peter F. S$tair .'evi(e at th e ens Leagu
10:45 -Muring Worship :;:30) i'M .-Qrenta-Am riCdi G r'oup. ' 1"k ic E T: D FA
"LOYALTV'" ING S OF RtEFORMEDlO ,JUDAISM"
(The( third in a ser'ies~ of Lenten C :00 P.M. -student Guld. ubject '1:15 P.M. -The Detroit Jewish Center
5( rm'ons on "QualitIO5 We Live Byn "ar We Live Lili Jesus.? Lead Association will peset a debate
7 :t3 E\' iig worsi rp ticn team, composed 01 Abe
7:ses rOu?00 p.M.-Fell\wship and suppe.rw'rlnad o Sudew Te
FAT1'ER lO" proposition "Res~olved: Th~ata
A cIPtu di aad~~cihUiversty Shouldae ls-
F IRST BA PT IST
T HE F IRST C HU RC H
P RESBYT E R IAN East Huron, West of state
Huron and Divislon Stireets D O
Alf'd L0see Kler Asoca Miniter AlerEGLECT Suerntndn
II :i AM.Studnt cassesat. he V II D10:45 A.M - Mornin, Worsl ip. Mr.
trho .FiNDING AN) KNOWING GO "
10:45 A.M.- Mornilg Worship. R E LIGIOUS 12OOM.gn tudent grou 'o
CHURCHMr. Chapman, leader.
Young eoples SACT . 600TP.. E Sudent gatherm" at the
Youn Peole socetyGuild House. Mr. H. K. Lo, gradu-
ate studen in Edcation anid P0-
Peocpleur.orYangp ets of the educational program
church wil present a pay program ' D scusin duins tocIal hour and
r

- -4yKurl Sdflrt-
Sweden, says a writer, is now four-fifths elec-
trified, the other fifth apparently not being in-
terested in Greta Garbo movies.
"Who is the Dybbuk?" asks an ad. Aren't those
the things you're supposed to replace on fair-
ways?
BYRON TO DISCUSS
'MEN AND WOMEN
RELATIONS' TOPIC
-Headline
As good an authoit#.y, probably, as anybody.
** *
Wool taken from the back of a dead sheep has
'less value for weavin ' than that from the back
of a live sheep, according to a news item. Prob-
ably of less value to the sheep, too.
,y* ,
DEAR, DEAR DEPT.
CLASS.IFIED AD: Paint, lacquer-15,000 gals.
Acme, Peninsular, Rogers, and others, as low as
65c gal.; our creditors demand cash at once. Open
Sunday.
'i "I '.

SLY WINK DEPT.
"Ladies and gentlemen, you are wondering
perhaps just why a clergyman has been select-
ed to address you tonight on the Detroit bank-
ing situation.

l'

ST. PAU L'S
LUTHERAN'
(MissOUriSynod)
Third and West Liberty
C. A. BrauerPastor
Sunday, March 26
9:30 A.M.-Lenten Service in German
Sermon: Christ and His Crown of
Thorns"
10:45 A.M.--Ser\'he in Engtish. Ser-
monsTopic: "Comparing''wo lRe-
ig ionis"

ZION LUTH ERAN
CHURCH
Washington St at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, pastor
SA.M.-Billc School. Lesson Topic:
"JeĀ° as, Our Example ill Sacrifice
And Service."
Service in the German Language
10 -30 A.M.-Service with sermon oi
s AN) ' OUR TEMPORAL
'MUN T _ Ewfn; cl :1iS"~xc

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL
CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod)
South Fourth Avenue
Theodore Schmale, Pastor
9:00 A.M.-Bible School
1000 AM,-. Mornfn 11 W O r'i.
1SerAM.- top: G

-Rev. Fr. Charles F. Coughlin.

}: . . '

When conclrete mixers were shown for the first

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