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March 24, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-24

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_TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

)AILY

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Publsned every morning except Monday during the
U versty d year and Summer Session by the Board in
Cotrol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
foy republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
pu lished herein.. All rights of republication of special
di patcle are reserved.
ntered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1. 0. During regular school year by carrier, #4.00; by
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Anr Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
.epresentatives: College Publications Representatives,
In ., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City: 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 012 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETH
C1IFY EDITOR........................ KARL SEIFRT
SPORTSZ D ITOR... ............Jo N W. THOMAS
WOMEN'$ EDITOR..............MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NI HT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renian, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPRTS ASSSTANT: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.,
R PORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G,
8arndt; Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
S.Ferils, Sidney Frankel, John O. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Edwin W. Richardson,
George .Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
:arbarS Bates, Marjorie E. BeJc~, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
Jeanetoe Duff, Carol J. Eanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Teephone 2-1214
BtUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON >0. VEDDER-
CIEIT MANAGER.... ......B..ARRY BEGLE~
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANACR......DONNA BKER
DEPARTAMENT MANAGER4. : dvertising, rafto Sharp;
#dvertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson Advertising Serv-
ce, Notl Turner; Accounts Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
qulation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
ASISTANTS: John Belamy,:.Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
Iand, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrice,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester Skinner, Joseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
* liabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
(limnmy Billy Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
tried, VIrginia McComb.
FRIDAY, IMARCH 24, 1933
Elimnate Freshman
And Sophomore Years?. .
p AUL F. VOELKER, Democratic
candidate for the office of state
superintendent of public education, made a speech
Tuesday in Battle Creek. In it he advocated the
elimination of freshmen and sophomore classes
at the University of Michigan.
If the public intends to weigh the pro's and
con's of this suggestion, they will wish to know
what the students of the University think about
it.
We who attend the University derive two sorts
of benefits from our college exprience. These
can be classified as academic and non-academic.
The question to be considered, then, is the effect
that would result from a reduction by two years
of the amount of time we spend in these two
spheres of education.
The difficulty with which a freshman acclimates
himself to the college intellectual regimen is tra-
ditional. Most transfers, owing to differences in
teaching methods, are similarly hardput during
their irst semester or two here. This is so true
that very few persons, whether teachers or stu-
dents, will disagree with the statement that a
student makes intellectual progress during his last
three years that far outweighs thrice the gains
made as a freshman. Cut off two years, then, and
you will reduce the academic benefit of a Mich-
igan education by much more than a half.
The loss that would result in the non-academic
sphere is more apparent, and even greater.
Friendship, fraternity, extra-curricular activity,
to plant only the seeds of these at least a year
is necessary. And even at the end of the second
year the fruit is but beginning really to ripen.
The full harvest of rich, albeit usually intangible,
gain, is not reaped until we are Juniors and Sen-
irs, Cut off two years here, then, and you will
very nearly destroy the whole.
Further than this, we do not understand how
any economic gain would accrue to the state
should the proposed elimination take place. If a
fourr year education is to be given, someone must
pay for it. Something can never be had for
nothfig. _

Mr. Voelker proposes that the first two college
years be spent at public and private junior col-
leges. Perhaps we are inexpert, but we can not
see how a large iumber of small institutions
can be operated for less, or even for as much;
as one large one.
So student opinion, for those who would fie
to know what it is, is against the elimination here
of the freshman and sophomore years.
Harris Sells
His Reputation...
A T THE TIME of the recent Reed'
Harris vs. Columbia University
case, which aroused considerable unfavorable
publicity for Columbia, the sympathy of numerous
college editors in the nation was aroused, and
many of them editorialized in condemnation of
the university's action against Harris. Harris, it
will be remembered was expelled for his "crusad-
ing" tactics against "King Football" at Columbia.
'Fl,-' nn'wnir +in, -o- ,t arn .aneri situdnt

are very much inclined to deprecate Harris' value.
After his resignation from the student body at
Columbia, Haris published a book, "King Foot-
ball," which was a somewhat incoherent expan-
sion of his arguments in the Columbia Spectator.
The book enjoyed a fair sale among editors, col-
legiate and otherwise, and Columbia students
who were either incensed or amused by the case.
In a recent issue of a New York tabloid which
caters to the gum-chewing lower classes, Harris
-now termed the "fiery, spectacular, young ex-
Columbia editor" who was the unfortunate vic-
tim of stern authority-has come out with a
"startling expose" of "cribbing" on examinations
at Columbia and elsewhere. The greater part of
the article is a re-write, with added editorial
comment, from the Panther, University of Pitts-
burgh humor magazine.
"'Cribbing' is a big business; it is nation-wide;
it is easy," says Harris, in an article embellished
with the familiar photograph of his sneering pro-
file and with others of various beauteous alleged
co-eds demonstrating familiar methods of "crib-
bing." He describes standard mechanical devices
and some old and new ways to illicitly get in-
formation for examinations.
We condemn this sort of thing on the part of
a mali who once held a major position in one of
the nation's leading educational centers, and it
is our desire to do our share in pointing out
to the reading public that such tactics are neither
commendable nor characteristic of college editors.
We sympathized with Harris when he was ex-
pelled from Columbia for commenting on pro-
fessionalism in, football. However, our sympathies
ceased when he showed himself to be solely a
publicity seeker and resigned from the student
body after being reinstated. Now that he is de-
liberately misrepresenting the average university
student, now that he is picking out one question-
able phase of college life and telling the world
that it is universal and big business, our sym-
pathy has turned to contempt.
It is our assertion that Harris at Columbia was
merely a "crusading" editor for the publicity he
got out of it. It may be smart to capitalize on no-
toriety by splashing one's name over the pages
of a low-grade newspaper (or even, in his cur-
rent fashion, over the pages of any newspaper),
but we question his ability to keep his name be-
fore the public for much longer and we hasten to
warn the public-even the collegiate public, which'
may read and misunderstand-that this is merely
another case of a cheap publicist sensationally
exaggerating a lesser feature of college life.
We are grateful for one thing: if Harris con-
fines himself to the pages of a New York tabloid,
at least his slurs will only fall on the ears
of a public which is mentally incompetent to de-
mand action against the collegiate system, action
which might be grossly unfair and permanently
damaging.

you're in for a new experience, and even if you
have you probably are.
So here you are:
1. We liked the music, because, although some
of it wasn't so good, most of it gave you the real,
honest-to-gosh musical comedy feeling. "Hot Ca-
zot!" "Love? Paree!" and "Love on the Run" were
good numbers.
2. We liked Ruth Campbell, because (we refer
here to her stage personality) she is the goofiest,
dizziest, craziest dame we've seen in many a pale
blue moon, and because if she doesn't learn to
dance and go see Mr. Shubert she's even crazier
than we think she is. To you go all the big, red
roses, Miss Campbell.
3. We liked Mary Ann Mathewson, because,
being pretty, and having considerable grace, she
did all (except, perhaps, sing) that any musical
comedy heroine is supposed to do.
4. We liked the story, because, although Miss
Giddings wrote in five or six too many love se-
quences, the thing was crazy enough and free
enough to make it possible to work in anything,
and, if anybody should ask you, that's one of
the things a Junior Girls' Play has to have.
5. We liked the "Depression Sisters," because
the act that Charlotte Johnson, Harriet Jennings,
and Alice Goodenow put on is-no offense, girls-
one of the most irrational, incomprehensible, in-
coherent, and profoundly amusing things that we
have ever seen amateurs do.
6. We WOULD have liked the "Dolly Sisters"
if after their tremendous build-up, they had been
given anything to do. They are a pair that prom-
ised much, but, apparently, that is just one of
the things that happens in Junior Girls' Plays.
And then again.
1. We did NOT like the choruses, but then the
girls DID have such a good time, and worked SO
hard.
Everybody we missed is a swell fellow, and
we really expected something a whole lot less
amusing, and having seen a Junior Girls' Play we
can now feel that we need never look back and
regret having missed one of the great Michigan
traditions, and, even if that doesn't mean any-
thing to you, you ought to go see what they're
doing these days over in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Town Points
By FRANCIS WAGNER
The name "Ann Arbor" is distinctive. No other
city in the world bears the same name. A letter
sent from Europe and addressed to just Ann
Arbor will have no trouble reaching its destina-
tion.
Until recently, Detroit had a namesake in Min-
nesota. To remedy the confusion, the Gopher State
town changed its name to Detroit Lake.
The church-goer has a choice of 24 houses of
worship in Ann Arbor. Denominations: Four
Methodist, four Lutheran, Two Catholic, two Bap-
tist, two Jewish, and one each of Congregational-
ist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Evangelical, Chris-
tian Scientist, Disciples, Seventh Day Adventist,
Greek Orthodox, Salvation Army and Holiness
Association.
Only 48 per cent of the land in the city is
taxable. The rest is owned by state, city, county,
churches, and school district.
Ten Ann Arbor streets bear the names of pres-
idents-Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe,
Adams, Jackson, Lincoln, McKinley, Roosevelt,
and Hoover.
The town founders of Ann Arbor, Allen and
Rumsey, are buried in obscure graves in Forest
Hill Cemetery.
U. S. Sen. Royal S. Copeland of New York got
his start in politics here, serving as mayor of Ann
Arbor. He was a Republican here, now a Democrat
in New York.

"I

11 no Imm,

If YOU wrte, wb&VOreit.
o 'nc3ence Sta.tionery,
miuPens, Ink, etc.
vrpe1iters all makces.
GreetinZCSrdZ for eveybod-y.

314 S. State St., Ann Abr.

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REAM THE DAILY
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THERE are two big thrills in the Spring
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home - the other, appearing at your well-
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Greyhound special round-trip rates for col-
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from the
MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSI FlED
DIRECTORY
Here there is advertised
everything from Rooms,
Typing, Tutoring, etc.,
to "Wanted-A J.Hop
Date." Get in the habit
of reading the Classifieds
because they are interest-
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bargains!

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Screen Reflections

i
:

"V

.. - -- ' 1

Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good. two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.

AT THE MICHIGAN
"THE HALF-NAKED TRUTH"

*gGOOD PICTURE OF THE PUBLICITY
MAN WHO INVADES BROADWAY
Jimmy Bates ................ Lee Tracy
The Tamale......... ..Lupe Velez
Achilles ...............Eugene Pallette
Lee Tracy, with his hat cocked on one side and
an eye out for suckers, begins this picture as a;
carnival barker trying unsuccessfully to interest
the rubes in the charms of Lupe Velez, whose
dances are "a symphony of muscle," but he has
bigger things in mind.
After getting the carnival torn down amidst
orthodox cries of "Hey, Rube," as the result of
a publicity stunt, Tracy, the Tamale, and Achilles
the faithful servitor, start for Broadway to take
the big town by storm. Arriving in New York,
Tracy, the kind of publicity agent one reads
about, finds out that they are bigger suckers
there than in the sticks. After placing the Ta-
male in "Earle Farrell's Follies" things go wrong
for the publicity man and he finds in the end
that he has sawdust in his veins.
Tracy does well in his part as a high-pressure
salesman, breezy, dynamic, overcoming everything
in his path. Lupe Velez as the cootch dancer is as
vivacious as ever with lot sof shruging of shoul-
ders and stamping of feet. The usual undressing
scene has been omitted from this picture. There
doesn't seem to be an opportunity for it.
There is a catchy tune that runs all through
the show. Something about "Oh, Mr..Carpenter,"
that you will find it hard not to whistle as you
leave the theatre.
The comedy is "The Singing Plumber," a Mack
Sennett production. It's the story of the lad with
an Irish brogue and a good voice who earns, fame
and the girl of his heart at his first concert on an
amateur night at a vaudeville house. He really
has a very good voice.
For the ladies there is an explananon oy a coif-
feur of how the hair should be arranged to bring
out latent beauty, and there is a good Paramount
news-no horse races or battleships on parade.
-B. S.

Minimum Required
This special offer includes bed, bath and table inens, harldkerchiefs, dresses, aprons, children's
wearing apparel, underwear, (lace curtains ex-cepted). Everything carefully ironed, ready
for use. Every family wash kept separate . .. no ink markings or tags used.
Additional Pounds 13c--HFand Finished

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By Karl Sefferg - *
"An attitude of opposition toward the new
Germany," says Mr. Hitler, "would display not
only a total lack of understanding of the real
situation', but also a disregard of the interests
of the opposition parties and their followers.
Now we're getting somewhere-just what is the
real situation, Adolf?
* * *
MRS. MWACKINNEY TO
SING SOLO IN CHORUS
Headline
Probably done with a disappearing trap
door.
* * *
Phi Kappa Psi entertained at sandwiches Sun-
day night at the chapter house, 720 Elm Ave.,
-News Item.
Something new, it appears, in entertainment.
"Margaret Cole, of Detroit, was responsible for
the numerous dance arrangements" of the Junior
Girls' Play, according to the Detroit News. Oh,
they've been able to pin it on somebody, eh?
SLY WINK DEPT.
"I am too darn busy to try to make jobs. My
duty is to all the people of Michigan first and
to the Democratic party second."
-Governor Comstock.
ILLEGAL PRACTICES
DENIED BY QUARTET
-Headline
Wel thev -ouln't have mured"Sgweet

ME 'S SHIRTS
Included in this bundle

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Jig-Saw Puzzle Fre
An attractive complicated Jig-Saw Puzzle placed in
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Musical Events
THOSE JUNIOR GIRLS ARE AT IT
AGAIN, . "LOVE ON THE RUN"
By GEORGE SPELVIN
Fankly, your Uncle George is still a little be-
wildered. You see, your Uncle George has seen
musical shows before-scads of them-but he has
never seen a Junior Girls' Play before. Now
Unicle George would never think, for instance of
trying ot review a Martha Graham dance recital,
because Uncle George dones't understand Martha
Graham; nor, by the same token, would he, at this
writing, attempt to pass judgment on an exhibi-

The Varsity takes every opportunity to better serve its custoen rs. Take advantage of this
Economy Prest Family Bundle offer, for you will receive the sane superior laundering and fine
service that has made Varsity the leading landry in Ann Arbor.
T H E

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