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March 05, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-03-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A DAILY

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the world. Japan is not and cannot be an iso-
lated unit, apart from the family of nations. In-
deed, she does not want to be. But such an in-
cident as this emphasizes the fact that Japan is,
for all her show of bravado, quite'dependent upon
the rest of us. Had it not been for the prompt
and willing help of western nations in many other
catastrophies of history, Japanese people would
have died by the millions.
We would not begrudge them this aid, but we
would like to point out the doctrine of reciproca-
tion to them. Japan cannot go around with her
nose in the air scorning the censure of the rest
of the civilized world and then, in her hour of
need, expect the world to come gladly to her
rescue. The Golden Rule originated as a doctrine
of Oriental philosophy, and it would be a good
idea to take it back to the Orient and put it to
ie
inwork.

Screen Reflections

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Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Antn Arbor, Michigan, Phone: 2-1214
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
In., 4o0 East Thirty-Fourth2Street, New York City; 80
floylton Street, Boston; 612 orth Michigan Avenue
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............FRANK B. GILBRETHI
CITY EDITOR........................ KARL SEIFERT
SPORTS EDITOR........JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.............MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connelan, John W. Pritchard,
Joseph A. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters. ._
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
Albert Newman, Harmon Wolfe.
REPORTERS: Charles Baird, A. Ellis Ball, Charles G.
Barndt, Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes. Edwin W. Richardson,
George Van Wieek, Guy M. Whippe, Jr.
Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck, Eleanor B. Blum, Ellen
Jane Cooley, Louise Crandall, Dorothy Dishman,
,Jeanette Duff, Carol J. Hanan, Lois J'otter, Helen Levi-
son, Marie J. Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan, Marjorie
Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.................BYRON C. VEDDER
OP . DIT MANAGER. .................. HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BEKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
4dvertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ie, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cr-
culation, GilbertR EBursle pPublications, Robert .
Flnn.
ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Josph Huime, AlIen Knuusir Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
Lester, Skinnie, JOseph Sudow, Robert Ward.
-llzabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman. Doris
Gimmy,rBilly Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
, Virginia McComb
SUNDAY, MARCH 5, 1933
Union Haircuts
TheUnion is still charging 45 cents for hair-
cuts. Every other shop in town is charging 35
cents. The Union, a student club, is a non-
profit organization and exists solely for the
students. Yet the Union will not meet the town
iate.
Michigan's Economists And
Senator Vandenberg.
A T A TIME like the present, when
public confidence so obviously
needs stimulation, it is unfortunate that there
should be confusion about the meanings of cer-
tin remedial banking proposals.
Last week Professors Sharfman, Watkins, Grif-
fin, Rodkey, and Paton formulated, broadcast,
and forwarded to Washington, suggestions which
they as professional economists believe might
be of immediate aid to the alarming situation
confronting the nation's banks. The cornerstone
of their proposals was governmental guarantee of
bank deposits.
A few days later Senator Vandenberg broad-
cast his ideas about what should be done. And
again the word "guarantee" loomed large.
Now Michigan's professors and Senator Van-
denberg meant two entirely different things by
this term. Careful listeners undoubtedly saw the
difference, and were not confused. But it is to
be feared that the general public is a bit muddled
by what was said,
Professors Sharfman, Watkins, Griffin, Rodkey,
and Paton propose "immediate guarantee by the
Federal Government of the deposits of all insti-
tutions doing a commercial or savings bank busi-
ness." Their thesis certainly appears to be rea-
sonable. Persons in unaffected districts, they
.argue, are bound to withdraw what savings they
have as they see most of the nation's banks clos-
ing. And persons in neither the affected nor the
unaffected districts can be blamed in the least
for refusing to deposit funds in institutions that
nmight be closed while the ink on their receipts,
so to speak, was still wet. The one remedy that
apparently would stop this very understandable
phenomenon would be guarantee by the govern-
ment of all banking institutions. So much for the
suggestion of our professors.
Senator Vandenberg's proposal, on the other
hand, would have very little to do with the imme-
diate situation. What Senator Vandenberg of-
fors is a mutual guarantee of time deposits, by the
banks themselves, through a reserve fund sup-
plied by them and administered by the govern-
ment. The Senator's suggestion, which is of course
very trite, appears sound. But the machinery it
would necessitate as well as the restricted field to
which it applies bars it from consideration as an

immediate remedy. It is pretty much like a pro-
posal for universal insurance made during an epi-
demic.
So 'the proposals are quite different, even
though both have to do with "guarantee."

Expect Much Of
The Douglas Budget ..
REAL evidence of concreteness in
the imminent new deal is apparent
in the appointment of Rep. Lewis Douglas as Di-
rector of the Budget. The whole country wants,
probably more than anythig else, to see the bud-
get balanced. And Mr. Lewis has gone on record
gas committed to a balance of the budget regard-
less of the pain which that feat will inflict on
certain heretofore privileged classes.
Furthermore, we have the assurance of Arthur
Krock, writing in the New York Times, that if Mr.
Douglas "had not believed that Mr. Roosevelt
knows the methods he has in mind, and intends
to back them completely, he in the opinion of
those who know him best, would never have left
his place of growing importance in the House
of Representatives for one of the two or three
most difficult tasks in the next administration."
One of the slashes that Mr. Douglas is sure to
push will be in the Veterans' Administration. His
home state, Arizona, has more veterans per capita
than any other state in the union. In spite of this
fact he voiced vehement criticism, through the
past winter, of the Federal outlay for ex-soldiers.
According to Mr. Krock he favors cutting $400,-
000,000 in this department-which would amount
to almost a half of the reduction necessary to bal-
ance the budget.
No one can question the justice of such a cut.
Most of the so-called "veterans" never saw service
outside of training camps safely within the bor-
ders of the United States.The billion dollars they
receive has been decried by everyone from ex-
President Hoover, Al Smith, and Newton D. Baker
down. A partisan, tremendously effective lobby
is the only explanation for the fact that veterans
in this country receive many times more than
those of any other country in the world.
In a scene characterized by a Congressional ma-
jority afraid to curtail this unjust extravagance,
a shining exception has been Representative
Douglas. His outspoken deprecation of the Vet-
erans' Administration shows he has real courage,
and augurs well for a brave and intelligent ful-
fillment of his office-one of the most difficult in
the whole Federal government.
A Tribute To
Franklin D. Roosevelt-...
F RANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT,
who took his oath of office yester-
day, has one of the biggest jobs of reconstruction
that ever faced an incoming president of the
United States. How he will solve the problem that
confronts him is problematical.
However, the President has already passed one
milestone in his promised new deal. He has gained
the trust of the people. Exactly how he has ac-
complished this is not known but it is known that
he, like one of his predecessors that carried the
same name, can mix and make friends with the
common man.
This is the single quality that was noticeably
lacking in ex-President Hoover during his admin-
istration and was, no doubt, to a great extent,
responsible for his defeat. Let it be said for the
retiring president, however, that he has shown an
excellent attitude during the past three months
in co-operating with Roosevelt.
At the present time, the greatest tribute that
one can pay the President is this:
Although the economic condition of the coun-
try can best be described as chaotic, although
banking holidays have been declared in almost all
of the states, the people are calm. They are tak-
ing a very serious situation good humoredly.
Because they feel sure that Franklin Delano
Roosevelt will find a way out.
Editorial Comment

Four stars means extraordInary; three stars very
good; two stars good: ono star just another picLture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"STRANGE INTERLUDE"
* **ITS MAXIMUM APPEAL TO OTHER
THAN A STUDENT AUDIENCE
Nina Leeds.............Norma Shearer
Ned ....... ................Clark Gable
Samr.e............... Alexander Kirkland
Charlie ................. Ralph Morgan
Gordon .................. Robert Young
Madeleine .......... Maureen O'Sullivan
Eugene O'Neill, considered by many to be
America's leading playwright, has given the world
in "Strange Interlude" a tremendously powerful
and appealing story, reinforced by a novel device
known as the aside, which gains even added force
on the talking screen because the lips of the char-
acter don't move and so spoil the illusion of
thought.
As a psychological document, "Strange Inter-
lude" concerns itself with a 30-year span in the
life of one Nina Leeds (Norma Shearer), the
daughter of a professor in a small eastern college.
When her sweetheart is shot down in the war, her
life becomes one of erotic desires, typified by her
childless marriage to Sam-necessarily childless
because of the hereditary insanity in his family
through m a n y generations.
Nina is slavishly adored by
Charlie Marsden (Ralph Mor-
gan) and is devotedly in lovef
with Ned (Clark Gable).
Under O'Neill's masterful
pen the amazing possibilities
which could accrue from
these relationships were made
into a pathetic tragedy, pyra-
miding itself into a hopeless
void capable of keeping Nina
and Ned apart as if by steel
bands.
Of touching interest is NOPMA SHEARER
Ralph Morgan's role of Charlie, who, as
"dear old Charlie" is destined to remain in the
background until, nearly a generation later, he is
revealed to Nina as the most steadfast of the
three men who fashioned her life.
The web of deceit binding the characters to
their tragic lives is one that could be broken apart
at any time with one sentence. When the awe-
inspiring words "You've struck your father" are
finally uttered, it is more than significant that
young Gordon fails to grasp their meaning. Thus
living a lie is proven, in "Strange Interlude," to
be a dull, heart-sickening duty after the first in-
spired years are in shadows.
O'Neill's masterpiece will be an event in your
picture-going. To the more susceptible, it will
bring many a tear. To others, it will bring the
realization that they are witnessing something
far removed from ordinary straight movie fare.
Added attractions: Hearst Metrotone News.
("Strange Interlude" is an unusually long pic-
ture.) -G. M. W. Jr.

-,

314 :. Sta.-be St., Ann, AxbDr:

YOUR NEEDS

PRO GRAMS

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from the

For Your Spring Party
Or Initiation Banquet
Designed and printed at T-iE CRAFT
PRESS express the unexcelled judg-
ment of skilled craftsmen. Have you
seen our window display of modern
Program designs?
There are several hundred late books

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSI FIED
DIRECTORY
Here there is advertised
everything from Rooms,
Typing, Tutoring, etc.,
to "Wancd- A J-Hop
Date." Get in the habit
of reading the Classifieds
because they are interest-
ing and they offer many
bargains!

to select from in
library.

our new lending

THE CRAFT PRESS

305 Maynard St.

Phone 8805

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AT 49 CENTS!

We are closing out our stock of Hi-Grade papers originally valued
at 75c, $1.00, and $1.25, at one price of 49c. An unusal oppor-
tunity to purchase supreme quality stationery at wholesale prices.
Numerous marked down values can be found in both our stores
we are certain you will benefit from a visit to our stores
any time this week.
A table of several hundred volumes of interesting books

originally priced at from $1.00 to $5.00,
NOW

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&STRIPES

--- y Karl Seifert
ALL'S RIGHT WITH THE WORLD, ETC.
All hail to Mr. Henry Ford,
Forerunner of a dawning day!
Let us raise voice with one accord
(All hail to Mr. Henry Ford!)
Now liquidation is insured,
And Wall Street cannot say him nay.
All hail to Mr. Henry Ford . .
I still draw scrip instead of pay.
Music hath charms to sooth wild beasts,
And, wafted on a melody,
Fierce tigers share their gory feasts
(Music hath charms to sooth wild beasts);
While serpents sleep in birdies' neasts,
Lulled by harmonic rhapsody.
Music hath charms to sooth wild beasts.,
And cash could do the same for me.
-woop.
Feb. 28, 1933
Dear Jwoop;
I like your verse all right, but where do you get
that "birdies' nests" stuff? Just because you can't
find a rhyme for "'beasts" do you think I'm going
to palm stuff like that off on my readers?
-K. S.
March 1, 1933
Dear K. S.:
Regarding verse I sent you Feb. 27-1 have the
best classical authority for using the variation
"neasts" for "nests." Poets too numerous to men-
tion have employed that form. -Jwoop.
March 2, 1933
Dear Jwoop:
About your verse of 27th. I don't care if Homer
himself used "neasts." I think it's lousy. My read-
ers won't stand for it. -K. S.
March 3, 1933
Dear K. S.:
Listen, you-you can take it or leave it, but if
you run my verse, "neasts" stays in. By the way,
you ought to be satisfied to have 'me write half
your column for you without quibbling over minor
matters. Also, what do you mean, "your readers?"
I asked the other one and he says "neasts" is O.K.
.Twoop.
March 4, 1933.
Dear Jwoop:
Regarding the verse which you sent me on Feb.
27, I wish to express my complete satisfaction and
to commend you on your continued good work.
Your verse will run tomorrow. -K. S.

"AT BOTH ENDS OF THE CAMPUS"

SLATER' S BOOKSTORES

STATE STREET

EAST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

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The Good News

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Is Out

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THE DISMISSAL BELL
AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE-
Nothing irritates students quite as much or as
quickly as the habit of some professors to hold
their classes three or four minutes after the dis-
missal bell has rung, yet this is a prevalent fault
among the members of our teaching staff. Either
too engrossed in their subject to heed the closing
signal or deliberately disregarding it, they lecture
on while the members of the class collect their
books and shuffle their feet. On the other hand,
some professors adhere to the schedule and should
be entitled to the courtesy of punctual attend-
ance.
Ten minutes is ample time to leave one class,
cross the campus and prepare for another class,
and often there are a few seconds for leisure. Any
infringement on this ten-minute period naturally
is resented by the students and some professors
as well.
An interesting point about this detainment is
that inevitably it seems the professors prone to
keep their classes from two to five minutes over-
time are the ones who remark, "If you must come
into this class late, you will be marked absent for

* I JUNIOR GIRLS. PLAY I
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
March 22-25
I '_j_ _I I

Japan's Snubs
Anti] Eath alak

TODAY'S TITLE ROLE

11

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