100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1932 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

is

4a110

MEl
ASSOI

a

I

FEBRUARY 26, 1932

WEATHER: Fair, moderate,

PRICE

----- -

Associated Press Photo
Rain today caused Sir Malcolm Campbell, of England, to postpone
an attempt to break his own newly established world automobile speed
record over courses of one kilometer, one mile and five miles. He said
he would try tomorrow if conditions are suitable.
LIST OF ELIGIBLE FRESHMEN
WILL BE MADE KNOWN TODAY

CAMPUS ATTACKED
BY FLU EPIDEMIC
Health Service Crowded as Many
Students Seek Relief
From Colds,
A flu and winter grippe epidemic
on the campus this week has more
than tripled student calls for doc-
Lors and as a result the Health
Service has been forced to treat the
majority of cases in the rooms of
the students because of inadequate
facilities for treatment in the
health service building.
Yesterday Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe, director of Health Service
reported that although there were
unquestionably more than the us-
ual number of students ill with
various respiratory infections, that
there should be no cause for alarm.
"The cases, with the exception of
one instance of pneumonia, have
invariably been only slightly serious
and the patieni~s have recovered in
two or three days,"' Dr. Forsythe
said.
Fraternities and sororities, how-
ever, have reported that the epi-
demic has hit several members si-
multaneously, and Health Service
doctors confirmed this report say-
ing that it was common when mak-
ing a call to find four or five stud-
ents needing treatment.
Police Auto Cruiser
Stolen Second Time
For the second time in the past
three weeks, the scout car of the
Ann Arbor police has been stolen.
Aartin Waluswicz, 23, and Sam De
Wid, 32, of Detroit made that mis-
take yesterday.-
The boys escaped from the De-
troit house of ccrrection several
weeks ago and came to -Ann Arbor.
After taking the scout car they
returned to Detroit where they
were seized and brought back to
Ann Arbor.
Arraigned before Judge Sample,
' and ere sentenced to serve two
and a half to five years in Jackson
prison. Judge Sample also decreed
that they complete their terms in
the house of correction first.
GANGSTERS KILLED
IN CLVLNDFU
I _________

CHINESE, JAPANESE ARTIL

ACTIVET'HOU6HOUT DAY
ADVANTAGEGAINED1IN BA
Ammunition Supply of Chinese Runs Low
Side Reports Heavy Casualties to Ene
With Little Loss in Own Ranks.
(By Associated Press)
Artillery punished first one side, then the other, as
battle went on today in the Kiangwan sector and aroun
between the Chinese army and the fighters of Japan.
Steadied by their success in recovering from a rout an(
back by desperate fighting much of the ground that had
when the Japanese smashed the line north of Kiangwan, th<
turned a vicious artillery bombardment on the Japanese str
in Hongkew park.
- Japanese guns answering shell for shell, at dawn we
most of the firing, for Chinese ammunition was running
gunners had orders to use it sparingly.
The two armies battled for hours without advantage

I

side. Machine guns kept up an
nhroken hubbub.
Each side said its fire was inflict-
ing heavy casualties upon the
enemy, while it was suffpring but
slightly. The Japanese said they
had suffered less than 100 casual-
ties, but inflicted "thousands upon
the Chinese."
The Chinese said their losses
were negligible' and the Japanese
"were trying to hide their' casual-
ties," estimated by the Chinese at
700 dead and wounded.
Meanwhile, the Japanese rushedx
troops and heavy guns to the north,
either to safeguard against another
burst of spirited fighting by the
Chinese or in preparation for an-
other attempt on their own part
to crack the line.
Althoughtthe Chinese almost lost
Kiangwan when the Japanese
assault lines pushed ahead 60C
yards, capturing the village of
Miaochungchen, they regained b
desperate fighting almost every bit
of ground they had retreated from
api this morning l<iangwan still
was theirs.
Three hundred woi'n out iem-
bers of the 31st U. S. infapitry, whc
had been in the international set-
tlement defense lines for 15 days,
were relieved. Dirty and grimy from
their tour of duty, they immedi-
ately launched a major bathing
and shaving operation.
Kilted Scottish "ladies from Hell"
took the old 31st position in one of
the hottest places on the interna-
tional settlement boundary.
Ameircan officials attempted to
get all United States citizens out of
the Astor house, which is-in one of
the Shanghai danger zones, but
they didn't want to come.
The German consulate was evac-
uated against the possibility of a
heavy bombardment by the Chinese
on the nearby Japanese consulate.
In Tokyo a high foreign office of-
ficial declared that "ignorance of
the history of the Washington con-
ference" was displayed by Secretary
of State Stimson in his open letter'
to Senator Borah in which the sec-
retary asserted the whole fabric of
international understanding in the
Far East was threatened by bSino-
Japanese hostilities.
Jap a n e s e military authorities
worked at top speed and under the
protection of censorship to rush re-
inforcements to Shanghai.

'

ARMS CI
DRBOPS Sli

LIVI~

Universal, Complete I
Suggested by Ru
Voted Down.
GENEVA, Feb. 25-
World Disarmament Conf
day voted down Russia',
for immediate total and
disarmament throughout
The projposal was pre:
Maxim Litvinoff, Sovieti
for foreign affairs. On)
and Russia voted for the
"The special interests c
aition makers," M. Litv
'are stronger than th
;roups. 'Civilization woul
'er niuch if all the fighti
'ar East were done v
fists."
The British resolution
the draft convention of
liminary Disarmament C
a basis of discussion by
ference was adopted un
The draft convention i
line of a general dis
treaty drawn ,p in 193(
generally been regarded
ing in the main for st
of present armaments. A\
voted for the proposal
defeat of his plan.
Premier Andre Ta
France, moved that, the
constitute a special poll
mission to consider the F
posals on security and a
League of Nations.
M. Tardieu recommenc
up three commissions on
material a n d expendit
broached this plan as a
for the League Secreta
posal to organize the
into commissions on h
aerial and expenditures
Foreign Minister Dino
Italy, objected t o th
scheme, as did Hugh Git
American delegation, exc
formation of a political c
This indicated that tl
French framework was
"he Americans, but not;
divisions.
The German and Dui
tions criticised the Fre
a n d Rumania a n d
strongly approved it.
The various objectors
the French plan for a po
mission. Mr. Tardieu- i
withdrew the remaindi
French plan.

Two More Dying as Result
Bloody Massacre in
Cigar Store.

oft

CLEVELAND, Feb. 25-(P)-Two
men were shot and killed and two
others wounded today on Woodland
Ave's "bloody corner," where Cleve-
land's gang warfare has centered.
The two dead men wedre identi-
fied by police as Rosario and Ray-,
mond Porello, brothers, and mem-
bers of an alleged bootlegging clan
that long has been involved in gang
shootings.
Joseph Demanti, one of t h e
wounded men, was reported dying
in a hospital.
The fourth woun led man- was
Dominic Terre, polinesaid. He also
was reported in a dying condition.
The double slaying marked an-
other phase of vengeance agaiist
the Porellos. Only three of seven
Porello brothers now remain alive.
Four of them have died gangsters'
deaths in the struggle for control
of the corn sugar industry here. --
The execution occurred as the
four were playing cards in the cigar
store of Joe Todaro. Two or more
automobiles drove up and round
after round of shot was fired
through a plate glass window into
the store.

t
7
l
x
s
i
i

Ann ArborBootlegger
j Gets Term in Jackson
George Leigh, 49, local bootlegger,
arrested on Dec. 10, was sentenced
to serve from one to two years in
Jackson prison by Judge Robert'M.
Sample yesterday.
Leigh pleaded not ,guilty on Feb.
15 in the Circuit Court but changed
his plea to guilty today. He served
a three-year term in Jackson from
1927 to 1930 on a similar charge.

Comedy club's first showing of 1 was obsessed by a strange martyr
"Anthony and. Anna" was received complEx which gave her great!
last night by a partially filled house pleasure in the thought that the
at the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre. Chicago iaers would robablcar-
The proceeds rrom last nght's per- Cp y
formance, the performance tonight ry headlines which would shout to,
and tomorrow night will all be the world the fact that a young and
turned over to the office of the beautiful Chicago heiress h a d
dean of students to be used.in the thrown away millions for an ideal
aid of financially distressed; stud- love affair.
ents.
The plan was considered yester-
day of possibly presenting addition- WATKINS CLOSES
al performances week after next;, ,iB
however, this has not been defin.- DETROIT 'CLUBS'
itely decided upon. According to the
statement of Robert C. McDonald, DETROIT, Feb. 25.---(JP)-
'32, last night, the show was a great Four of the City's most "ex-
success. Ruth Stesel, '33, who play- clusive' blind pigs were ordered
ed the part of Anna, was given a closed by Police Commissioner
great deal of the credit for the James K. Watkins, Thursday.
hearty reception which the play re- The owners were given until
ceiv one set which represented Friday to discontinue business,
the lobby of an English inn and was and if they fail to meet the de-
used for all three acts was designed mands of the Commissioner by

UNION OFFERS FRESHMEN CHANCE
TO TRY OUT FOR COMMITTEE JOBS.

An opportunity for second semes -1
ter freshmen and sophomores to
try out for positions on committees
of the Union was announced last
night by Hugh R. Conklin, '32E,
president. The first meeting of can-
didates will be held at 3 o'clock,
Tuesday,tMar. 8, in the student of-
fices at the Union.
Tryouts may serve on any of five
general committees, according to
Conklin':The dance committee has
charge of the regular Friday and
Saturday night dances, feature
dances, and the annual Union For-

mittee are responsible for banquets,
receptions, and all social functions;
with the exception of dances. They
also assist at the student rooming
bureau which is in operation at the
beginning of the fall semester.
The underclass committee is m
charge of the freshman advisory
system, freshman banquets, fresh.-
man and sophomor smokers, and
freshman tournaments.
Tryouts for the Union become
committeemen at the beginning of
their s6phomore year. At the end

Medical Photon
Dies of Bloo
Harry F. Minkley,
photographer of the Un
pital staff for the past
died yesterday after a
caused by blood poison
survived y his wife, v
tary to D. Warren E. I
rector of Health Servic

University Fr<
Charged Witi
DETROIT, Feb. 25
McCardle, 20, freshm,
versity, was held las
Northville county jail

of this year, chairmanships and as-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan