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June 05, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, JUNE 5, 1932,

rTHE MICHIGAN

DTflY

PAGE I

__ _ _
_ _
a -. _ -

E, RR TA:KEaS R OtE
AYEOHBYHOWNARUD
il Act in 'Animal Kingdom';
Play Opens Monday; Is
Third of Series.
(Continued from Page 1)
ances Dade, now an ingenue
yer, in many moving pictures,
Li take the part of a gossipy
end. Miss Dade was selected as
e of tie thirteen Baby Wampus
ars last year; from whose ranks
nually many of the famous film.
rs have risen. In the last two
rs she has been featured in pic-
es with Ronald Colman, Lowell
erman, Anna May Wong and
Lrner Oland, Lois Wilson, Con-
y Tearle and Bela Lugosi.
Ar. Kerr himself has starred in
ny New York productions, in-
ding "The Changelings" with
ith Chatterton; "Gentlemen Pre-
Blondes" and the Belasco pro-
ction of "The Bachelor Father"
h June Walker; "JustdSuppose"
Ia Patrica Collinge; and recently
pictures with Mary Brian. His
,her is the famous character
or in the films, Frederick Kerr;
d his wife, June Walker, is equal-
well-known.
Phe Ann Arbor production of
he Animal Kingdom" will be the
t outside of New York, and will
presented while the play is still
ying to capacity audiences at the
pure theatre, New York. It is
aided as one of Philip Barry's
st comedies. Its story concerns
Tom Collier, who marries the
:ng girl. He is in love with a
sitive young artist, but is at-
cted physically to a beautiful,
,llow society debutante. He mar-
s the society girl, only to find his
ole life changed. He is cut off
in all his old friends amdng the
ists, and caught in the Delilah-
shes of his, cheap and grasping,
e. Suddenly, to his horror, he
lizes that his wife is no more
Ln a mistress to him; 'while the
ng artist, who was his mistress,
is real wife.
Brooks Atkinson, distinguished
matic critic of the New York
nes, said of "The Animal King-
n," "It is a play that eludes the
l cliches of our workaday the-
e. It does not blurt out its
anings in sentences that 'have
simplicity and shallowness of
.dlines. Its characters are not

SIGNALS WRONG?

Department Stores
Report Decline of
Twenty Per Cent
In an interview yesterday morn-
ing, Prof. Edgar H. Gaukt, of the
school of business administration,
stated that the small department
stores of the middle-west are at
present feeling the effects .of the
decreased buying power of the con-
sumer. The sales of these stores
for the month of May in most cases
are less than 20 per cent of what
they were in May, 1929.
"Much of the decline has been
caused by a fall in retail prices, so
that actually the physical volume
of merchandise handled is only 20
per cent less," said Professor Gault.
In a recent publication of the
University bureau of business re-
search the operating loss of depart-
ment stores was reported as being
28 perecent of 'the 1931 sales as
compared to a loss of five-tenths of
one per cent for 1930.
"Most of the stores," said Pro-
fessor Gault, "have been able to
adjust their operating expenses in
line with the decrease in sales,
however, and thou h they are not
making money, th ir losses are no
greater than those of last year."
Ancient Pottery Is
Gift to Museum Here
The Museum of Anthropology of
the University museums has re-
ceived a gift of a series of Indian
pottery fragments from Fred Dustin
of Saginaw, it was learned yester-
day. The fragments are from the
district of the Saginaw valley and
have enabled the department of
anthropology to gain a good idea
of the variety and complexity of the
aboriginal industry in that region.
The archeological work in the
Saginaw valley was started by
Harle I. Smith, now of the National
museum of Canada and is being
carried on by Dustin.
Bill Jurges, Chicago Cubs' -third
baseman, has improved his hitting
by practicing against a gang of
youngsters who come to the park
each morning to pitch to him and
"shag" flies.

BACKS ROOSEVELT'

ri.ssomxtct Prcs Photo
Fifth avenue's bronze signal tow-
ers have entered the investigation
of New York's city government.
Samuel Seabury (left) charges
Nayor Walker (right) owns bonds
in the company which erected the
towers. He cites this as a violation
of a city law forbidding city offi-
cials from owning stock in any
company holding a city contract.
all-good and all-bad puppets, man-
ipulated by heavy wires which most
dramatists unashamed expose to
the naked eye. The play has the
richness, the full flavor and the in-
definiteness of life about it. It is a
sincere comedy, tender and moving
by turns; and it brings great love-
liness into the theatre."
"The Animal Kingdom" will be
presented every night next week
and at the Wednesday matinee. On
Saturday afternoon, June 11, Shaw's
"Great Catherine" will be given its
first special performance.
Beginning Monday, June 13,
Violet Kemble-Cooper will be star-
red in "The Vinegar Tree," and
"Peter Ibbetson," with Violet
Kemble-Cooper and Glenn Hunter
will be the last presentation of the
season opening Saturday, June 18.

Associated rress iPnoto
Senator Robert F. Wagner (above)
of New York May make the nomi-
nating speech in behalf of Gover-
nor Roosevelt of New York at tie
democratic national convention.
Volunteers Seek Burial
or Recovery of Bodies
HILO, T. H., June 4.-(')-Hop-
ing to recover the bodies ofWilliam
Nunes and Margaret Enos from
Halemanmau, the "house of ever-
lasting .fire," police and volunteers
today gathered on the rim of the
firepit for a perilous descent into
the crater of Kilaue4.
Officials of the Hawaiian Nation-
al park viewed the attempt as im-
practical and dangerous, but the
volunteers expected to receive per-
mission to lower themselves by rope
into the volcano. The bodies lie
900 feet beneath the rim, about
50 feet from a pool of boiling lava.
Nunes leaped to his death Thurs-
day with the body of the high
school girl, whom he shot after she
refused his love. Parents of both
the boy and girl urged that theI
bodies be recoverpd.
If they can not be recovered,
plans are to bury the bodies under
a landslide by blasting, in the tomb
the youth chose for himself and the
girl he loved.

Says Advertising Rise
Presages Up-Trend
NEW YORK, June 4.-(1P)-Sam-
uel H. Weston, expert on newspaper
operation, said today that for the
first time since 1929 advertising had
shown a slight upward trend, and
he expressed the opinion that this
was a hopeful sign for forthcoming
general improvement.
One reason expressed for this
outlook was that in April classified
advertising volume started distinct-
ly upward as compared with the
first two months of the year.
"This has been followed in a les-
ser degree by total advertising," he-
said. "If this index works in the
future as it has in the past, it in-
dicates there will be a slow 'out
steady increase in total advertising
volume."
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 8)
of the Medici; Boellmann: Prayer,
Toccata from the Gothic Suite.
Automobile Regulation Corrected
Schedule: The following schedule
will mark the lifting of the Auto-
mobile Regulation for students in
various colleges and departments of
the University:
Literary College, Engineering Col-
lege, College of Pharmacy, School
of Education, School of Business
Ad., School of Music, School of
Forestry, Graduate Department, on
June 14, 1932, at 12 o'clock noon.
Medical College: Seniors, June 3,
1932 at 5 p.m. Juniors, May 28, 1932,
at 5 p.m. Sophomores, May 27, 1932,
at 5 p.m. Freshmen, June 9, 1932,
at 5 p.m.
Law School: Seniors, June 9, 1932,
at 5 p.m.; Juniors, June 8, 1932, at
5 p.m.; Freshmen, June 7, 1932, at
5 P.M.
Dental School: Seniors, June 9,
1932, at 12 o'clock noon; Juniors,
June 9, 1932, at 12 o'clock noon;
Freshmen, June 9, 1932, at 12 noon.
SPECIAL PRICES
to FRATERNITIES
For drapes and curtains to be
installed during sumner.
Phone 7351
Pilbeam & Marz Co.
206 South 4th Ave.

All students enrolled in the above
departments will be required to
adhere strictly to the foregoing
schedule. W. B. Rea,
Assistant to the Dean.
Varsity Band: General orders for
Commencement Week band: report
at 4:45 o'clock, Monday, June 13,
at Morris Hall, with instruments,
for brief drill and evening rehear-
sal; this is in preparation for the
Jackson trip on the following day.
Day-to-day orders given at that
time.
The Commencement Week band
will consist of the following men,
who are ordered to report at the
above time:
Piccolos: H. Rose, W. Hunter
Oboe: R. Raney
Clarinets: W. Huntley, W. Koeh-
ler, W. Babcock, A. Wragby, E.
Kempf, W. Richard, F. Searles, C.
Ellis, S. Bernstein, S. White, F.
Ernst, R. Pierce, K. Brown, B.
Hirsch.
Saxophones: R. Olson, E. Rice, L.;
Colwell, C. Schoen.
Contra-bassoon: C. Schoen
Cornets: J. Pfohl,/ R. Allen, W.;
Murray, M. Helper, M. Uphouse, D..
Bachelor, L. Freeman, W. Griffit ,
R. Fulghum, J. McNitt
French Horns: R. Hinterman, G.
Danneffel, C. Elbert, J. Creagean,
G. Falcone, P. Cox
Baritones: R. Troutman, P. Simp-
son, N. Reglein, F. Mercier, J. Mac-
Carr
Trombones: H. Koster, K. Sco-
ville, A. Radford, R. Melendy, M&
Greenstein, J. Russell
Basses: J. Curtis, H. MacLean, M.
Demers, J. Wannamaker, E. Wien-
man, R. Warner
String Basses: R. Troutman, W.
B. Babcock
Percussion: E. Scott, E. Huckle,
A. Beech, A. Mortenson, J. Martin-
dale, F. Parker
Drum-Major: F. Riley
Managers: R. Allbright, S. Mc-
Gaughan
Librarian: W. Weiss.
ACADEMIC NOTICE
English 1-Sections 42, 46 (last
semester): I still have notebooks
belonging to students who were in

these sections. They may be ob-
ined by calling at my office, Room
3224 A.H., Tuesday, 8:45.-12 a.m.
Raymond Bli6s.
EVENTS TODAY
Life Saving for Women: Candi-
dates for the senior life saving
emnblem will meet at the Union pool
at 9 a.m. Laurie E. Campbell.
St. Andrew's Church: Holy Com-
rtunion, 8 a.m., Church School at
9:':30 a.m., Kindergarten at 11 a.m.,
--.oly Communion and sermon by
the Reverend Henry Lewis 11 a.m.
Harris Hall: Tea will be served at
live o'clock each afternoon during
examination week for any who- care
to drop in.
Presbyterian Young People: Sun-
Clay School c(lass 9:30 a.m., at the
Church House will be led by Dr. E.
MBlakeman. Everybody urged to be
there.
Sunday Evening Forum 5:30 at
the Church House will be led by
Jule Ayers, S.C.A. President elect,
on "The Christian Approach to tho
Campus.
COMING EVENT
Michigan Daives will meet Tues-
day, June 7, at 8 p.m., in the Grand
Rapids Room of the League.

You Find Your Gas
Bills Too High
Consult with us about heating
your water with a
' COAL-FIRED -
HEATER',
Reasonably Prced '

I'

Dial 7102

SAM C. ANDRES
Sanitary and Heating
Engineer.

BEAUTY 1OPPE
Our Quality 10 Permanent Waves Are Now
Being Given for, Only $5.

k.

HIGH GRADE REPAIR SERVICE

BEFORE YOU LEAVE
chigan" Stationery, Jewelry, Leather Goods, Pennants,
Pillows and Banners.
25% Off
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE.
111I South University Avenue

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry

WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE TO HAVE WITH US
WILLIAM F. STAEBLER -

I

'Is A.,}

i

'' .I 1 .

FOR YEARS A

-77 7
.lE

FAVORITE BARBER IN MANY
PROMINENT DETROiT SHOPS

'rI"'' ,
__ _ ...

! ,'

OF THE MOST
State Street

Dial 8878

£d -

3

Final Edition

Universal Courteous Service

_ . - _ ___ mm. _ __ k

4k

Fro, now until1CohenZeInt we w aintal special earance
rour enti st k, exept text books
MAY WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING AS EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES:
FINE LEAT ER'DATE BOOKS FOR YOUR SUMMER TRIP-NOW ONE HALF OFF.
ALL REMAINDERS OF FELT GOODS-ONE HALF OFF.

I

foundres
for $1.00.

of volumes of fiction and non-fiction-as low as 3 c per volume or 3 volumes
A real chance to stock the cottage or camp for summer.

1

I

TAKE A SOUVENIR OF THE COLLEGE YEAR TO THE YOUNGSTER IN THE FAMILY-"A MICH-
IGAN PURP"-REGULAR VALUE $1.00-NOW 29 CENTS.
Fountain pens and pen and pencil, sets-lifetime guarantee -the most practical gift
for the graduate--at drastic reductions. Inquire of either of our two stores - Our
assortment is the largest in the city.
FINE BINDINGS-THE HIGHEST ART IN BOOKING-"A PRINCELY GIFT" FOR THE GRAD-
UATE. REDUCED ONE THIRD.
ALL STATIONERY-EXCELLENT GRADES-40% OFF. -
Remember-Bookstores offer the better grades of blue books-made of fine Iroquois paper-pleasing to the
pen-no blotting--same prices as the cheaper grades.
WE WILL OFFER FAIR CASH PRICES FOR YOUR USED TEXT BOOKS
The final days of the school year will find many opportunities for real savings at both our stores. Many
fine selections for Commencement gifts at reductions of one third to one half off.

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v v 9 -V VT 0 90 % Ar 0 v 0

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