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June 04, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-06-04

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JUNE 4, 1932 i

THE TCHIGAN DATLY

JUE4...T E T H GA AL

ichigan

Cops

One

National,

Two

Big Ten

Titles

OLVERINES SHARE1
GRIDIRON C RO 4N
irmers Make Best Record by
Winning N.C.A.A. Meet;
Harriers Win One.

To Stay With Cards

From The

By Marjorie Western
Now that the sports season is of-
ficially over, it is time to reflect'
back over the victories and defeats
sustained by the Maize and Blue
teams, and see just where they
stack up when their records are
compared with those compiled by
their' adversaries.
One national title, two firsts in
the Western Conference, and a tie
for a third Big Ten crown is what
Michigan has to show for the 1931-
32 school year.
The Wolverines won highest hon-
ors when they copped the N. C. A. A.
swimming title, snatching it from
Stanford after a thrilling race. Be-
fore that they handily took the
Conference swimming crown.
The other title they cleared is the
Big Ten track championship. They
scored an upset over Ohio State
whendthe latter, conceded a prob-
able win, came in with 46 1-2 to
Michigan's 50 1-2.
In football, the Michigan squad
was forced to share its laurels with
Purdue and Northwestern, each of
the three leaders having dropped
one Conference battle.
The Maize and Blue gridders pil-
ed up eight victories, six in the
Big Ten. They battled Michigan
State to a scoreless tie, and lost
to Ohio State.
FOOTBALL
Michigan 27, Central State 0.
Michigan 34, State Normal 0.
Michigan 13, Chicago 7.
Michigan 7, Ohio State 20.
Michigan 35, Illinois 0.
Michigan 21, Princeton 0.
Michigan 22, Indiana 0.
Michigan 0, Michigan State 0.
Michigan 6, Minnesota 0.
Michigan 16, Wisconsin 0.
The harriers had a rather un-
successful season. They won one
meet but dropped the other five.
CROSS-COUNTRY
Michigan 16, Detroit Y. M. C. A.
46.
Michigan 33, Normal 22.
Michigan 31, Michigan State 24.
Michigan 30, Illinois 27, O. S. U.
71.
(Triangular meet)
Michigan 36, Wisconsin 19.
Michigan 76, Wisconsin 63, Ind-
diana 38.
(Conference meet)
The national swimming champs,
as was to be expected, easily took
all their meets and won the
N. C. A. A. carnival. Four points be-
hind Stanford, the leaders at the
close of the semi-finals, the Michi-
gan mermen finally finished on the
long end of the 34-31 count.
SWIMMING
Michigan 53, Minnesota 22.
Michigan 44, Northwestern 31.
Michigan 42, Northwestern 29.
(Conference meet)
Michigan 34, Stanford 31.
(N. C. A. A. meet)
COURTRIGHT WILL
GIVE INSTRUCTION
R. O. Courtright, coach of the
Varsity golf team, will give special
golf lessons to students, and faculty
members on the University course
during the summer, it is announced.
Coach Courtright has been busy
with the University teams until
now, but will be able to devote his
entire attention to individual les-
sons for the summer session. He will
be located at the course all sum-
mer.
Considerable professional exper-
lence backs Courtright's teaching.
He was assistant pro at Westward
Ho country club, Chicago, for one
year, and pro at Bay View country
club, Petoskey, for a summer. He
recently tied the University course
record, turning in a tally of 68,
and set a new record for the first
nine holes with a score of 31.

Jerome 'Dizzy' Dean, talkative
rookie pitcher of the championship
St. Louis Cardinals, who threaten-
ed with release to a minor league
club for indifferent work this sea-
son made good in his final trial,
Wednesday afternoon, beating the
Cubs 1 to 0, yielding only seven
hits.
INDIANA BATS \WELL
IN WINNING* CROW'JN
Baker Leads in Hitting as Six
Hoosiers Bat Over .300
Mark for Year.
(Big Ten News Service)
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., June 3.-
Why Indiana university's baseball
team finished at the top of the
Big Ten diamond race this year is
clearly indicated by the batting,
fielding, and pitching averages just
released by Coach Everett Dean.
Six of the Hoosiers batted over
.300 for the year. The fielding aver-
age was also high and three of
Indiana's four hurlers went through
the season undefeated. Wright was
the only pitcher to lose games. He
dropped two but his six victories
more than offset the losses. The
team batting average was .272 while
the fielding average was .903.
Baker, third baseman, led the
batters with an average of .500.
Saluski, right fielder, batted .429
while Red Wright, pitcher, hit .394.
Koenig, first baseman, played in all
the games this year and batted .367
while co-captain May batted .344 in
all games. Howorth, outfielder, also
batted over .300.
In addition to their hard-hitting,
Saluski, Koenig and May fielded
well. Saluski's defense was perfect,
while Koenig and May fielded .941
and .976 respectively. Rea was the
slugger of the team with a double,
three triples, and a homer. Koenig
struck out only four times in 15
games. Dickey and Banka stole the
most bases with six each.

PRESS BOX
By John Thomas -
Roland L. Martin, Substituting.
Just how the United States
swimmers will do in the Olympic
games in Los Angeles may depend
somewhat on the showing of four
or five University of Michigan na-
tators when the final events are
held in the new pool.
Headed by the all-around
performance of Johnny
Schiniecrcapta in-elect of the
swimming team for 1933, and
holder of several tank rec-
ords, the Wolverine stars will
be entered in the final Olympic
tryout in Cincinnati on July
15 and 16. Schmieler will be
aided by Taylor Drysdale, Big
Ten champion in the back
stroke, Jim Cristy, who splash-
ed to second place behind Clapp
when he set a new American
record, andDick Degener, nat-
ional senior A.AU. high board
diving champion, who will work
on the Pacific coast this sum-
mer with Micky Riley of South-
ern California, who was defeat-
ed by the Wolverine sophomore
in four of six meetings.
Schmieler is one of the most ver-
satile swimmers ever to participate
for the Maize and Blue, being al-
most equally adept in the free
style, back stroke, and breast
stroke. The black-haired star's
versatility can be shown by' his
marks made here in the N.C.A.A.
meet in March.
In the qualifying round on
Friday, March 25, Schmicler es-
tablished a new record for the
200-yard breast stroke by swim-
ming the distance in 2:32.6. In
the 220-yard free style on the
same day, lie set a new record
of 2:15.6 and on the following
day in the finals came back to
swim the distance in 2:15.4.
The performance of Dick Dege-
ner in defeating Mickey Riley for
the National championship after
losing to the Californian in the
National collegiate meet in the In-
tramural pool is noteworthy. In
one of his dives, Degener was given
a perfect score by all the judges
and won the high board title by
scoring 166.04 points to 152.12 for
Riley.
Taylor Drysdale will have to
speed up. considerably in Cin-
cinnati if he is to have a chance
to represent this country in his
specialty. In the national sen-
ior A.A.U. George Kojac set a
new world's record of 1:37.4 for
the 150-yard backstroke which
is a considerably better mark
than Drysdale has made.
Jim Cristy has shown consider-
able promise in the meets this win-
ter, and should give Clapp plenty
of competition before the better oI
the two is determined.
STANDINGS

MNEL TAKES BID
OF CLEVELAND NINEI

LOU

GEHRIG
TO SETJ

Michigan Pitcher May Abandon
Japanese Tour to Play
Ball With Indians.'
Harley McNeal, who has been a
Varsity pitcher on the baseball'
team during the last three years,
and one of the mainstays of the
I diamond squad this season, an-
nounced officially yesterday that he
had signed a contract to play ball'
with the Cleveland Indians in the
near future.
Coach Ray Fisher has been ex-
pecting to take McNeal to Japan
to hurl his share of the eighteen
games scheduled there this sum-
mer, but according to the arrange-
ments as yet uncompleted with the1
Cleveland authorities, Harley may
abandon the land of the rising sun
in order to spend the summer and
fall in his own native town in morej
or less active service.
Through a comparatively unsuc-
cessful season, McNeal has pitched
the way to most of the victories the
Wolverines have nipped off, and the
be-spectacled right-hander has col-
lected a fair share of hits for the
genus of reputedly non-hitting
hurlers.
During the 1931 season, he dis-
played his best ability when he
allowed Colgate but five hits for a
Michigan victory, and in the cur-
tailed Ohio game. This spring, Mc-
Neal hurled Maize and Blue wins
over Chicago and Illinois, relieved
Wistert when the latter blew up in
the last Chicago tilt, and pitched
competent ball against Griffin of
Michigan State fame.
If Harley plays professional ball
. t, unmer, he will go into service
immediately after graduation. Mc-
Neal is from Lakewood, Ohio, a
suburb of Cleveland.

Philadelphia Is Overwhelmned by!
Yankees, 20-17, to Drop to
Second Division.
Nine home runs featured the
slugfest yesterday between the
Yankees and the Athletics, which
the New York team won 20 to 13.
Of the seven home runs hit by the
Yankees, Lou Gehrig garnered four,
to set a major league record for
modern times, for the number of
four-baggers hit in one game.
The Detroit T ers lost a double-
header to Cleveland. Wes Ferrell~
Cleveland pitching ace, was instru-
mentalnin winning his own game,
by hitting a home run in the fifth
inning with Montague on base. The
Tigers outhit .the Indians in the
second contest, but they were un-
able to bunch their hits so as to
make them count.
As a result of Cleveland's double'
victory yesterday, they move up to
fourth place to displace the cham-
pion Athletics who are now at the
head of the second division. The
Tigers still remain in third place.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York ....200 232 326--20 23 5
Athletics .....200 602 021-13 13 1t
Allen, Rhodes, Brown, Gomez and
Dickey; Earnshaw, Mahaffey, Wal-
berg, Rommel, Krausse and Coch-
rane.
St. Louis ...100 000 000 1- 2 5 1;
Chicago ....000 000 000 0- 1 10 0,
Blaeholder and Ferrell; Frasier,
and Berry.
Washington at Boston-rain.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Boston ........20 003 001-- 6 14 1
Brooklyn .....011 210 000-- 5 15 2
Frankhouse, Cunningham, Cant-
well and Spohrer; Clark, Moore and
Lopez.
Chicago ...010 000 031 00- 5 14 0
Pittsburgh. .000 000 230 01-- 6 13 3
Smith, May and Hemsley; Swet-
onic and Grace.
Philadelphia at New York-rain.
Cincinnati at St. Louis-rain.
Reg Noble, of the Detroit Falconsl
hockey team, was believed ready for
retiremnt last year, but came back
.this past season and was named
the team's most valuable player.

Other Indianapolis Winners Will
Appear in 100-Mile Event.

All of the first ten drivers to
finish at Indianapolis will be enter-
eded in the 100-mile dirt track race
scheduled for Detroit Fair Grounds
cour:,e tomorrow afternoon.
In addition, at least tenmore
men who appeared in' the annual
classic but failed to finish in the
money will compete.
Fourteen cars will start although
the entry list records practically
thirty as desirous of a chance to
qualify. This race is ranked second
in A.A.A. importance to the 500-
mile Decoration Day grind.
Among the better known Detroit
drivers who will start are Al Miller,
Chet Miller, Ray Campbell, who will
pilot E. D. Stair's 'Folly Farm'
entry.
Fred Frame, Louis Schneider, By
Saulpaugh, Bob Carey, Bill Winn,
Zeke Meyer, Russell Snowberger
Fred Winnai, Ira Hall, and Howdy
Wilcox are among the better known
roaring road pilots who will speed
their mounts around the course in
qualifying attempts Sunday morn-
ing.

HITS FOUR HOME RUNS
NEW MAJOR LEAGUE MARK

FRAME TO DRIVE
IN DETROIT RACE

First game
Cleveland .....000 020
Detroit .......001 000
Ferrell and Myatt;
Hayworth.

010- 3
000- 1
Bridges

10 0
9 1
and

I

iI

Second game
Cleveland ....012 022 210-10 11 1
Detroit .......200 012 110- 7 15 1
Harder, Connolly and Myatt;
Wyatt, Herring, Goldstein, Hogsett
and Hayworth.

gA EN AVANT evor forw,4
n 4A
A A

Golf Lessons
R. 0. Courtright, varsity golf
coach, is now available for les-
sons at the
University Golf Course
Rates Very Reasonable

Burr, Patterson & Auld Co.
Ma.., l.,turIn9 F.te. Ity. J wa t.
Detroit, Michigan a Wel.ervil, Ontario
A A
A vA

AWNINGS
TENTS AND COVERS
CAMPING EQUIPMENT
GYMNASIUM MATS
FLOOR COVERS
If it's made of Canvas
we make it."
Fox Tent & Awning Co.
603 W. Michigan Ypsilanti
215 So. Fourth Ann Arbor

Arnn Aroor
A 603 CKurc
F RANK 0 AKES

Store
st.
. Mgr.

r

Batting Averages

Baker, 3b.......
saluski, rf......
Wright, p .........
Koenig, 1b ........
May, cf.........
Howorth, if ......,
Dickey, rf......
Dugan, ss .........
Banka, 3b......

...1
....1
..,,1
.,..1
....1
....1
,...1

G ABH BA
4 12 6 .500
11 21 9 .429
9 33 13 .394
15 60 22 .367
15 64 22 .344
15 57 19 .333
13 48 14 .292
13 53 14 .286
13 45 12 .267
14 41 13 .255
9 13 3. 231
5 20 4 .20u
14 40 6 .150
5 8 1 .125
4 7 1 .143
3 4 0 .000
2 2 0 .000

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
New York ..............30 13
Washington ...........28 17
Detroit ................24 18
Cleveland ..............26 20
Philadelphia ...........25 20
St. Louis ...............21 24
Chicago ...............15 29
Boston ................ 7 35
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L

Pet.
.698
.622
.571
.565
.556
.467
.341
.167
Pet.
.609
.591
.500
.500
.477
.455
.444
.425

Rea, c ..............
Baer, 2b ............
Gatti,..............
Haussman, 2b......
Downes, c ..........
Dross, 2b ...........
3ailey, p...........
Gery, p ...........

Chieago...........
Boston............
Cincinnati.........
Pittsburgh .........
Brooklyn ........
St. Louis.........
Philadelphia.......
New York........

.28 18
.26 18

24
21
.....22
20
20
17

24
21
24
24
25
23

GFELL'S
MARKET

223 N. Main

Phone 4208

Shades of our
NEW ENGLAND
ANCESTORS
How they'd enjoy dinner at Dear-
born Inn! Savory fish cakes with
Boston baked beans-fragrant fish
chowder - rich-gravied pot roast
New England style-corn beef hash
with dropped egg-tender chicken
pie-old-fashioned pastries - fresh
strawberry shortcake! How YOU
will enjoy these and other flavorful
dishes, prepared by a chef skilled in
New England cookery.
Dearborn Inn provides an un-
usual background for bridge parties,
luncheons, dinners and teas. T'i ihe
d'hote luncheon in the Early Ameri-
can Dining Room, $1.25 and $1.00
a plate. Dinner, $1.50. Music by
the Dearborn Inn Trio. A la carte
service in the English Coffee Shop.
Colonial Lounge and Recreation
Room. 'Phone Dearborn 1810.
Ample parking snace andga.

JUST
RECEIVED
Large shipments of
Sanforized
Slacks
$1.95
White Flannels
$4.50
McGregor
Sweaters
White and Colors
$1.95, $2.45
Interwoven Socks
35c, 5Oc
(Light colors)
walk 4 pFw Sfiph

(,_
f
,.; ..
:_'; &

SUPPER MEATS

XITIURTX

JA

V iLiNFN1A

SAUSAGE.

.

I

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