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May 11, 1932 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-11

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T HE MICHIGAN

DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1932

_

sF al
Published every morning except Monday during the University
r by the Boardl in Contro'l of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-,
Oication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise'
ited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor Michigar, as second
a matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
ttmaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
higan. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Eusiness, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBIN
;s Editoe................................... David M. Nichol
Editor.......................................Carl Forsythe
torial Director ..........................Beach Conger, Jr.
its IEdior ....... .. .. . .................. Sheldon C. Fullerton
men's Editor...'....'..............'.Margaret M. Thompson
istant News Fditor .......................... Robert L. Pierce
. ' NIGHT EDITORS
nk B. Gilbreth J. Cullen Kennedy James Inglis
Roland A. Goodman Jerry E. Rosenthal
Karl seilrert George A. Stanter#

ian W. Jones
nley W. Arnheim
nal !r. llllukctz
Iw rd C(. tLramphl~rl
onias Connelln
jert S. ]leutch
ed A. Fluber
riam Carver
atrice Col!ins
rise Crandall
lie Feldman

Sports Assistants
John W. Thomas
REPORTERS
harold F. Klute
"!;n t. :rd n'hall
Roland Naitin
All)ertIL. Newman
I. ierome i'Ptit
Prudence Foster
Alice Gil'edt
Frane's Manchester
Elizabeth Mann

Charles A. Sanford
John W. Pritchard
josop% Renihan
C. Ilar Schaaf
llra(:kk~y Shaw
Parker Snydler
Glenn- R. Winters
Margaret O'l3r:a
Beverly Stark
Ama Wadsworth
Josejpline Woodhams

A college course designed for this purpose could be f
completed in three years."
At the present there are existing a great number
of colleges which might well answer to this descrip-
tion of Wilkins' classical college. Young men and
women enter these educational institutions often
with no well-defined plans in mind for the future.
Young women in particular are drawn into this typeI
of college for the fun of the thing.
However the graduation from such an institution
usually involves no great amount of satisfaction. In
most cases these students find themselves prepared
for nothing that will earn a living. They failed to
realize that what they needed to at least obtain a
job, was some ordinary practical knowledge which is
is not included in the curriculum of the classical col-
lege.
NO OTHER GOOD SUBSTITUTE
FOR LIQUOR CONTROL
(Minnesota Daily)
"......puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others which we know not of."
-Hamlet
Dr. Daniel Poling, chairman of the Allied Forces
for Prohibition, challenged the wets to produce a
worthy substitute for the eighteenth amendment
when he spoke in Minneapolis this week.
According to Dr. Poling, none of the methods
offered to replace the Volstead act (light wines andI
beer legalized, state option, Canadian system) would
eliminate the evils that accompany the administra-
tion of the present form of liquor control.
It is certainly true that unless an improvement
in the situation existing under prohibition can bej
assured, it is foolish to clamor for the recall of the
eighteenth amendment. At present, we have no such
assurance. If four per cent beer and wines were
legalized, the 'alky" rings of bootleggers purveying
stronger beverages than beer would still exist. And
how is the legalized liquor going to be sold? Not at
saloons, as even the wets are opposed to them. At
government stores? Why should the government go
into the brewing business and open a new and ideal
avenue of graft for unscrupulous politicians. No
matter where beer is sold, the atmosphere of the old
saloon will return in spite of efforts to keep dispen-
saries decent.
The Canadian and state option systems have both
been tried out. Reports from Canada too numerous
to mention here have shown that their method of
liquor control has not eliminated the bootlegger or
speakeasy, has not decreased drinking, drunkenness,
or crime, and has not proved satisfactory in general.
The United States experienced state option until in
1918 when that system was replaced by prohibition.
It was pointed out in these columns before that 1
bringing back beer would not help the economic
situation. While the brewers would no doubt be
benefited, manufacturers of near beer and soft drinks
would find their profits cut by competition. And the
average man's income would surely not swell with
that of the brewers.
While prohibition is by no means perfect, what
solution to the ageless problem of liquor control
would be better? We have yet to see the answer to I
that ,question.

Illi

Shorthand
Stenotypy
Typewriting
Bookkeeping
Calculator
Dictaphone
Secretarial
Training
DAY AND EVENING
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Streets
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Phone 7831

NOW

CLASSES
BEING FORMED

MeiwIca13' etv ,( W t 'to teL 4
y U how h AiPPYJ1uO , beca uefarri o i~Q t o N 10 d y .ci~
vtwood be Lat, hoAvei 4- h c-Kill) Who
~ ±h~ oiey c.2uv 0 +0.4/c
1~hQDot t ik 'z khe TEIIJVeWt cR
"P e2 f1ZtCR WOw'( y}ou ',4) IM'/fL
O7f o oI'LL b eVeouPe ri-/(
READT! AILY CLASSIFIEDS!

BUSINESS STAFF
l Telephone 21214
ARLES T, KLINE ........................ Business Manager
RRIS P. JOHNSON .....................Assistant Manager
DepartmentManagers
ertising .. ................................ Vernon Bishop
ertising Contracts ...........................1arry R. Begley
ertising Service............................Byron C. Vedder
dications .................................. Williamn T. Brown
ounts.......... .......................Richard Strateei
nen's Business Manager......................Ann W. Vernor

* '
Buy A Tag
"TAG DAY
MA11g
Provides
Three Meals
oAHunkir o9

vil Aronson
ibert E.rkBursley
len Clark
>bert Finn
onna Becker
axine Fischgrund
in Galhneyer
atherine Jackson
>rothy Iayljn

Assistants
Arthur F. Kohn
Btrnard Schnacke
Gratton W. Sharp
Virginia McComb
Caroline Mosher
le1n Olson
11l en Schumde
May SeefriedL

Donald A. Johnson, 11
Dean urner
Don Lyon
Bernard H. Good
Helen Spencer
Kathryn Spencer
Kathryn Stork
Clare Unger
Mary Elizabeth Watts

NIGHT EDITOR--ROLAND A. GOODMAN -
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1932
.. 0sin aG
..ounci President
ONIGIIT the Interfraternity Council chooses
its President for 1932-33 to usher in the local
eason of spring elections. Although the names of
ie candidates as nominated by the Judiciary com-
iittee have not been announced, factions will go
the meeting tonight fully prepared to wage
niith r tr dit-ionallc clnse b-milot war.

t

BUY A TAG
UNIVERSITY
FRESH AIR
CAMP

The leadership of the Interfraternity Council
a more important position than it was two years FACULTY PERSONALITIES
go. In 1930, the Interfraternity Council, as a (Daily Princetanian)
'hole, was one of the deadest campus organiza- Many historians are fond of attributing the great
ons and was a close rival for that doubtful honor j trends of human development to the interplay of
the Student Council. Since that time, however, complex economic forces. Perhaps they are right,
he body has become alive and vigorous. Its meet- but when attention is turned from the larger move-
igs are well-attended, its programs are mapped. ments of history to the smaller fluctuations of every- I
ut with more organization and intelligence. In day life, economic forces become less important and
tct, it is beginning to accomplish things. personalities more so in demarking lines of human
To the one who receives the position tonight change. In the eddies and side currents which to-
oes a wonderful opportunity to continue the gether compose broad trends, individual characters
rogress already begun. At the meeting tonight, frequently play dominant roles in shaping men's
ie new amendment permitting freshmen to pledge lives. In eveyr kind of human community, however
Eter three weeks instead of a full semester will large or small, there are always personalities stionger
ass and the first step towards repealing the malo- than the rest, stimulating others to emulate what
orous 1931-32 scheme will have been taken. they represent. Consciously or unconsciously they
To carry this act through to the end will need reverse whole creeds of conduct and give new direc-
capable and efficient president. It is to be hoped tions to human effort.
iat politics will not permit an incapable and in-I Nowhere, perhaps, is personality more at a prem-
fficient man to lead the Council at this time. ium than in the field of university instruction. There,
if anywhere, stimulating character is essential. In-
- U M ~ I deed the whole measure of teaching success is the
JnUIIC dDj RANAeffect on the pupil, and all the knowledge in the
world cannot compensate for failure to communicate
it properly. In Princeton today there are men whose
Student Recital . lectures create real enthusiasm for the course; there
- ? en Van Loon, of Highland Park, member of the are others who leave their students where they found
mior class of the School of Music, who recently won them plus a few more dusty facts. The first are
istinction because of a very brilliant piano recital teachers; the last are better left unnamed.
hich she gave, will give a second recital in Lydia Unfortunately, personality is not reducible to a
[endelssohn Theatre, Thursday afternoon, May 12, formula, nor can it be manufactured by any determ-
t 4:15 o'clock, when she will offer the following inable method of synthesis. More unfortunately,
ocal numbers. Miss Vin Loon is equally talented personality is difficult even of accurate measure-,
s a pianist or vocalist. Piano accompaniments will nents . In Princeton as elsewhere, some feasible'
e played by Louise Nelson of the piano faculty of system must be found of segregating rapidly and
he School of Music. . fairly the teachers from the imposters, or the Faculty
Then I Was Seventeen (Swedish Folk Song)...AnOn wil continue to be clogged with dead wood. Regard-
'Amour de moi (Old French) ................. Anon less of the details, the scheme would necessarily
ung i dal caro (Old Italian) ...................Sarti comprise the collection of reliable student opinion:
hepherd, Thy Demeanor Vary (Old on instructors, probably by some kind of official
English)...........................Brown questionnaire. If such a plan is effected, perhaps
ruhlingsnacht .......................Schumann I the day will come when every member of the Prince-
nitermezzo .............................Schumann ton Faculty will evolve to that significant position.
Vidm ung......................Schumann ; already occupied by the select few whose names
)er Nussbaum......................Schumann universally recommend their courses.
faro Norme from Rigoletto ....................Verdi E
lair de Lune ............................Szul1 THE SELECTIVE PROCESS
rillainelle ..............................D ell'Acqua
es Berceaux...........................Faure (Syracuse Daily Orange)
h! Quand Je Dors ..........................Liszt "In order to be truly free, the university must

-
t I
THIS WEEK
No2 $65
E *a
As aout ouPreshrun
LINEN SUITING
Custom Tailored
No.$1500
4
When we shrink Em they stay shrunk V
1 LIEN SITIN

es Filles de Cadix .......................Delibesl
by One....................Clarke
lackbird's Song........... .............Scott
[y Lover, He Comes on the Skee ...Clough-Leighter
Know a Hill.......... .............Whelpley
he Lark Now Leaves His Watery Nest......Parker

be tolerant. It must be able to find place for every
sort and kind of conviction which is competently
and intelligently arrived at, and which is honestly
and sincerely held, in order that the fittest of these
convictions may survive through free competition in
the fields of intellectual inquiry and tested human
experience." This is the opinion of Nicholas Murray
Buller, and is a piece of advice well worth considera-
tion in any college.
Open-mindedness is contantly preached to the

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EDXTOlAL COMMENT

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A CLASSICAL COLLEGE

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