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May 11, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DNEgDA.Y, Y rt 1, 1932

I38NS HLD
~Ri TO CO
IN SAYUANKERSL9
anding Gold Bonds Secure
Nation to Standard,
Is Belief.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEflNE~DAY MAY 11 1q~2
__________________________________ .~------..-.-----, ----- --a

r

French Party Head

LT UIMETR

Subst

itute Concentration Fields
for Major, Minor,
System.

GRE~AT

BRITAIN CITED

Debtors' Load May Be Increased
Rather Than Decreased
by Inflation.,
By Claude A. Jagger
NEW YORK, May 10.-(R')-The
United States is moored securely to
the gold standard by tne fact that
a large amount of bonds outstand-
ing in this country are gold bonds,
according to opinion in leading
banking quar ters.
Available statistics do not show
the amount of gold bonds outstand-
ing, but the total is estimated at
many billions of dollars. These
bonds are payable, both interest
and principal, in gol coin of the,
present weight anci iineness, or the
equivalent.
One of the chief arguments ad-
vanced for currency inflation is
that it would lessen the burdens.
of debtors. But in the case of debt-
ors who must pay in dollars of the
present gold content, it is conceiv-
able that their burdens would be
increased by depreciation of the
dollar, for they would have to ob-
tain more of the depreciated dol-
4lars to pay debts and interest due
in present dollars.
An example of the way this
would work is shown in the British
expericnce. With the depreciation
of the paper 'currency, the value of
gold coin increased. Gold sovereigns
with a par value of 20 shillings be-
came worth 30 shillings. A corpor-
ation having obligations redeem-
able in gold or equivalent, there-
fore, would have to pay about 50
per cent more. It has not been
customary in England, however, to
issue gold bonds, so that handicap
was less important than it might
be here. Great Britain's obligations
in this country, nevertheless, were
largely payable in gold or equiva-
lent, so that it has been more cost-
ly for her to pay interest on her
dollar bonds than before the lapse
i'rom the gold standard.
Not. -ily has a large amount of
both corporate and public debt is-
sued in this country been made
payable specifically in gold dollars
of the present weight and fineness,
or L eir equivalent, but at least one
of the leading Wall Street banks
requests that notes accepted from
its cusi,omers be payable in gold or
equivalent.

A sso'iated Cress Photo

Edouard Herriot, mayor of Lyons
and former premier of France, nar-
rowly escaped death Monday when
he made a :pectacular leap from
the path of a aling building in a
landslide which took the lives of
more thank 15 Lyonnais. Herriot is
head of the French radical social-
ists.
ISCO IN Of~EFU
ABOT RAB'§OB

en ,\c s Semvice)
EVANSTON, Ill., May 10-Recent
changes in the curriculum of the l
College of Liberal Arts of North-
western university will include the
substitution of fields of concentra-
tion for the present system of min-
or and major requirements.
Under the new system, according
'o a statement of Addison Hibbard,
de an of the College of Liberal Arts,
the students will be given added in-
cenfive and freedom in working'
jut their own educations. It will
"distinguish between the- serious,
superior student interested in se-
curing an educaton and the aver-
age, or socially minded student who
goes to college largely because it
is the thing to do."j
The new system of granting dip-
lomas of two kinds--an Honor and.
a Pass degree-will allow students
to study more independently if they
wish. . Reading and independent
study courses will be outlined. To-
ward the end of the senior year, a,
comprehensive examination will be
given covering the field of concen-
tration. However, all students must
state at the end of their junior
gear toward what degree they are
aiming so that opportunity may be
given to help them attain that de-
gree.
u~ LR1I SHFH[EDTJ
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

WISLAY OF PRNTS1Edmonson Defines Work of4
"A synthesis of the elementts Education in a position to offer un-
Extending its stay for several that teachers and research workers usual opportunities to advanced
more days, this year's exhibition in leading centers have found de- students and graduate students in
from the American Institute of sirable" is represented by the Uni- elementary education."
Graphic Arts in New York, "Fifty y
Prints of the Year," will continue versity elementary s c h o o1, said Research has always been recog
to be shown daily in the north gal- J. B. Edmonson of the School of nized as "major function of the
lery of Alumni Memorial hall. Education in an address delivered unit," emphasizing modern view-
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser says of before a meeting of women inter- points in child training, the dean
fhe exhibit than "it is an interest- ested in education, last night in the pointed out. "The faculty of the
ng collection of prints with a high Elementary school library. School of Education is thinking of
trade of excellence. It is difficult "School people sometimes ask, the new unit as one in which re-
to select any one print, however, 'Is the School of Education of the search workers from many depart-
which in relation to others is su- University of Michigan engaged, or ments of the University will carry
perlative." planning to engage, in the training forward their own studies.
"My favorite," says Professor of teachers for the elementary "The time has passed when the
Slusser, "is the lithograph, 'The grades?' ", Dean Edmonson contin school men are to be satistied with
Bather,' by Ernest Fiene, which ex- ued. "It should be explained that contributions to a better under-
hibits much skill in composition the University Elementary school standing of the child through only
and a striking contrast of colors." was designed not as a training one or two fields of learning. We
school in the usual sense, but rather must have the contributions of the
S Studet i Fas a unit intended for research and biologists, the psychologists, the
ISiX Students in inals experimentation. physiologists, the health workers,
of Poetry Recitations, "As a unit in which research 1s as well as the specialists in the
--- stressed, the University Elementary fields of medicine and education."
Six students were seleetted from chool has placed the School of The building, established as one
nine speakers last Monday night-

Grade Schools

4
T
t
l
T
3
S
5
.
J

BY A Tag
May 11

/

4' * *

a ill

to read in the finals of the
p o e t r y reading contest at 8
o'clock next Tuesday evening in the
Laboratory theatre. They are Wil-
bert L. Hindman, '33, Mary H. Mc-
Intosh, '34, L. E. Gilbert, grad., Viva
N. Richardson, '34, Alice Slama,
grad., and Evelyn Walford, '32.
Judges for the contest, conducted
by the Interpretative Arts society,
were Mrs. Evelyn Rockwell Gregory,
and Professors Louis M. Eich, of the
Speech department and Erich A.
Walter, of the English department.
~i
DONALD HENDERSON
CLARKE'S SENSATION!

war-a

of two laboratory units, was made
possible by a grant of funds from
the state legislature in 127, it was
pointed out. The building commit-
tee, before ctonstruction. conf ar ed
with a number of authorities and
visited many school buildings in or-
der to combine in the new project
the best possible educational facili-
ties.
"All of the studies reported under
the headings of hygiene, physiology,
and sociology," he said, "when pro-
perly developed and correlated, are
pertinent to chili welfare and are
essential to satisfactory advance-
m.ent in elementary education."

I

* * *

TAB

Affalift goo&
T

1I

FresaAiramI
pruna:,

Chances Are Figured at 3 to
Against Class of 1932,
University Shows.

1

Every student that wears a tag today has helped
make some unfortunate child happy.

to

(ig l l 'cn N s S V~C
MADISON, Wis., May 10.-Figur-
:ng odds to be three to one against
the 1932 graduate, University of
Wisconsin department heads areI
doleful concerning the effects of,
the depression on students seeking
positions upon graduation.
University and high school facul-
ties throughout the country are
being cut considerably, commercial
offers are curtailed by the surplus
of experienced workers, and where
jobs are available wage cuts and
increased responsibility too often
-make them undesirable.
Prof. R. A. Walker, assistant
chairman of the high school rela-
tions department, and who super-
vises the placing of graduates from
the educational department points
out that school boards are cutting
budgets and consequently salaries
to the extreme. The general wage
ut is over 10 per cent and in many
instances approximates 20 per cent.

I

,. . .. .

GIFTS

NOTICE
3RAND NEW 19332 PLYMOUTHIS--
Just received shipment of all cur-
rent models, coaches, sedans,
coupes. We will sell these at bar-
gain prices. Regular new car
warranty and service policy.
Associated Motor Services 311 W.
Huron. 22001. 611c
WANTED
WANTED-Porter and cook for
next fall, preferably married
couple. State expected salary.
Address Box A31. Mich. Daily. 628
TYPING-Grad. theses a specialty.
M. V. Ilartsuff. 9087.
526c
DETROIT family wants furnished
house in Ann Arbor for summer
school session; five bedrooms;
must be nominal rent, or will ex-
change for furnished house in
Indian Village, Detroit. Box A30,1
Michigan Daily. De . x619
YOUNG LADY who has had ex-
perience selling dresses for part
time work. Box A32, Michigan
Daily. 630
FOR RENT
HOUSE FOR RENT-Furnished or
unfurnished. 1324 Olivia. Avail-
able June 1. 614c
AN UNU$ALLY desirable office for
attorney, doctor, dentis, or engi-
neer. Now available in First Na-
tional Bank Bldg. For informa-
tion call bank office. 560c
SUBURBAN HOUSES FOR RENT-
1/ miles from campus. neat,
clean, modern, 5 and 6 room
houses, $35 to $50. E. E. Calkins.
Phone 7254. 632
FOR SALE
BAUSCH LOMB BINOCULAR re-
search microscope with Abbe con-
denser. Call 9630. 609c
MAY FESTIVAL TICKETS--2 very
choice. Full course or single con-
cert. Phone 21835. 627{

I

I;

You Can Reach

Home in a

lo ment or so -
Bfy Long, Distance
Telephone

/
/

$

OF ENDURING LOVELINESS

If You Have Occasion to Purchase Gifts
Remember Jewelry Is the Most Prized

SAll.

1{ cn ! °x e . _ _---- -- _ __ - ..-- -*-- 2a- - __= VI I

-the Younmg
Doctor- and the
Devil to Payl
V A
LEW AYRES
MAE CLARKE, UNA MERKEL,
JOHNHALLIDAY, Andy Devine
--ADDEDI
JOHNNY BURKE in
"His Week End"
SONG CARTOON
HEARST WORLD NEWS
S4 TURDA Y
"Arrowsmith"
RONALD COLMAN
HELEN HAYES
By Sinclair Lewis

-1

A Long Dis
call will take
home at once. .
talking is muchl
sa is facory
writing.

Let the folks at
home know your tele-
p h o n e number, so
they can reach you
quickly and easily.
Long Distance
service is fast and the
rates are surprisingly
low. You can charge
the call to your home
telephone, if you
wish.

lance
you
. and
ore
than

Kalamazoo
Marquette
Saginaw.
Flint ..-.-.

.70

1.80
0M

r

You can call the follow-
ing points from"Ann
Arbor and talk for three
minutes for the rates
shown.
Detroit . . -a .30'

.45

- L
- . _ _ _

Evening and Night
Station-to-Station Rates
are even lower.

(

7 ARCADE
JEWELRY SHOP I IF A
CARL F. BAY
16 NI CKELS ARCADE

)

_. P 1

MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE CO.

- 1t --2L

ONE MASTERS'
phone 3021.

GOWN. Tele-
629

First Show. Only Tonight-Red Arrow Auction

MICHI,,GAN

LAST TIMES TODAY

"The Milkman"
Flip the Frog Cartoon

Paramount
News

Thursday

"ITS TOUGH TO BE FAMOUS"
DOUG FAIRBANKS, JR.

I

Tickets are
or Sale

Ticket Sale
will be
limited to

daily in

The million d'l ar band leader with his nationally famous orchestra will play for the

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