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May 05, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-05-05

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

TRURSDAY, MAY 5,

THE. . . . MI.. ..H.uI GAN D r~.aILY ThU.. .... aDAY ... My 5..

DAILY OFFICIAL BUL LETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to
the President until 3:30; 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

IIVOL. XLII.

THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1932 No. 154

NOTICES
Freshmen and Sophomores, Spring Games: In accordance with cus-
tom and with the consent of their respective Deans, Freshmen and
Sophomores in the Colleges of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engi-
neering, Architecture, and Pharmacy -are excused from classes from
3 p.m., Friday, May 6, until 12 o'clock noon, Saturday, May 7, to allow
them to participate in the spring games. Alexander G. Ruthven.
NOTICE TO SENIORS! -':- GRADUATE STUDENTS!'

Diploma Fees Payable Now!
Early settlement is necessary for the preparation of diplomas. In no
case will- the University confer a degree at Commencement upon any
student who fails to pay this fee before 4 o'clock, p.m., May 25. In case
the Faculty does not recommend any payor, the fee will be refunded on
surrender of receipt for payment. The above applies also to fees for all
special certificates.
Candidates for degrees or certificates should AT ONCE fill out card
at office of the Secretary of THEIR COLLEGE or SCHOOL, pay the
Cashier* of the University and have card receipted, and file indicated
section of this receipted card with the Secretary of THEIR COLLEGE
or SCHOOL. (Students enrolled in the Literary .College, College of
Architecture and School of Music please note that blank forms should
be obtained and receipted cards filed "in the Recorder's Office, Room 4,
University Hall.)
Please do not delay till the last moment, but attend to this matter
at once. We must letter, sign, and seal approximately 2,500 diplomas;
and certificates, and we shall be greatly helped in this work by early
payment of the fee and the resulting longer period for preparation.
Shirley W. Smith.
*The Cashier's Office is closed on Saturday afternoons.
Henry Russel Lecture: Professor Jesse S. Reeves, Henry Russel lec-
turer for 1931-32, wil deliver an address on the subject, "The Codifica-
tion of International Law," at 4:15 p.m., Friday, May 6. On this occasion
turer for 1931-32, will deliver an address on the subject, "The Codifica-
open to the public.
To the 1embers of the University Council: The next regular meeting
of the University Council will be held on Monday, May.9, at 4:15 p.m.,
in Room "W," Alumni Memorial Hall. Louis A. Hopkins, Sec'y.
University Lecture: N. Daniel Mornet, Professor of French Literature
at the Sorbonne and now visiting lecturer at the University of Paris, will
lecture on Monday, May 7, at 4:15, Room 103 Romance Languages build-
ing, on the subject: "Le Theatre Francais Centemporain. The-public
is cordially invited. The lecture will be given in French.
Comprehensive Professional Examination in Education: Under the
regulations of the School of Education all candidates for the Teacher's
Certificate (except those receiving a Graduate degree this June) are
required to pass a Comprehensive Professional Examination in Educa-
tion before they are eligible for recommendation for the Certificate.
The next examination of this kind will be held from 9 to 12 o'clock
Saturday, May 21, in the auditorium of the University High School.
C. O. Davis.
WI.A.A. points for individual and intramural athletics will be record-
ed upon request at the W.A.A. office in the League today from 3:30 to
5:45 p.m.
Evening Swimming Class for Women: The academic swimming class
which meets at 7:30 on Tuesday and Thursday evenings at the Union
Pool will meet at the Intramural building at 6 p.m. Students who are
planning to attend the supper and have not made reservations may do,
so by calling University 721 before Thursday noon.
Senior Literary Students: Class dues will be collected Thursday and
Friday mornings from 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock in Angell Hall.
Presbyterian Students: There will not be a party at the church
house on Friday evening.
EXHIBITION

Observatory Journal Club meets
at 4:15, in the Observatory lecture
room. Dr. W. C. Rufus will speak on
the "Astronomy of Rittenhouse,"
whose 20th anniversary is being
commemorated this year. Tea will
be served at 3:45.
Political Science Journal Club
meets today in the Political Science
Seminar Room, 3-5.
Applied Mechanics Colloquium:
Room 445 W. Engineering bldg., at
7:30 p.m. Mr. A. Cowie will give a
paper on "Bending and Buckling of
a Bi-metallic Thermostat," includ-
ing demonstrations of experimental
apparatus. The review of literature
will be by Professor R. S. Swinton.
A.L.ChE.-Student Branch: Regu-
ar meeting on Thursday, May 5,
at 7:30 p.m., in Room 3201 East
Engineering bldg. Mr. L. A. Danse,
;hief metallurgist of the Cadillac
Motor Car company will address
the group on "An Unique Connect-
hg Rod." Movies and slides will
iustrate the lecture.
R.O.T.C. ceremony, entire Corps
and Band, South Ferry Field. Roll
call 5:07 p.m. This ceremony is
substituted for regular drill com-
panies for this week.
A Movie, "Empires of Steel,"
showing the construction of the
Empire State building, and a short
review of interesting facts by Pro-
fessor L. M. Gram, of the Civil
Engine ring department, willbe
given by the courtesy of the A.S.C.E.
Student Branch, 7:30 p.m., NaturalI
Science auditorium. Open to public.
No admission. _

(S, 'ciI to The Daily)
COLUMBUS, Ohio, May 4.-If the
statements of University depart-
ment heads as to the immediate
prospects of graduates for jobs are
true, then the seniors will fare far
better by staying in school for an-'
cther ycar or so.
Reports from the Graduate School,
the 10 colleges, and the professional
undergraduate schools indicate that
for the most part jobs are scarce:
than they were a year ago. One de-1
partment head even reported that
1931 graduates are still looking for
employment.
Somc of the big' corporations, as
usual, are combing the prospective
graduates for specially promising
men. But the number of positions
available is distinctly fewer and the
starting salaries are considerably
lower, the reports agree. Some stu-
dents are said to be planning to
return for advanced study until
business is better.
Prospective graduates in some of
the professions and those expecting
to receive the doctor of philosophy
degree appear to have the best
chances of obtainingemployment
following graduation. Most of the
Ph.D. candidates usually have posi-
tions in sight by the time they act-
ually get their degree.

GRDATES AT fHI0 ORIGINAL ALICE
FACE JOBLESSNESS
Work Is Scarcer Than in 1931;
Seniors May Be Forced to
Return Next Year. I;.

KUNZ WILL GIVE
TALK ON COLLEGE
Theosophical Society to Sponsor
Address of Scholar.
Fritz Kunz, who claims to be able
to "pour old wine into the new bot-
ties of today's civilization," will talk
at 4:15 o ciock this afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium underI
the auspices of the student theo-
sophical club on the subject, "The
Perils of a College Education."
Between 1917 and 1919 Kunz
lived in India and made an ex-
haustive study of Indian philosophy.
His present tour of the United
States, he says, is for the purpose
of interpreting western thought,
effort, and problems, in terms of
Indian wisdom.
Kunz graduated from the Uni-
ve-rsity of Wisconsin in 1912, having
specialized in anthropology and
philosophy. r

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard St.
Today 11:30 to 1:30
Spaghetti and Meat Balls, Lettuce
Beef Hash with Poached Egg, Beets
Roast Beef or Liver and Bacon
Mashed Potatoes, Beets
Cottage Cheese Salad, Cold Meats
Potato Chips
Chocolate Custard or Raspberry Jello
Coffee,Milk
30c
5:30 to 7:30
Soup
Liver and Bacon
IIamburg Steak, Fried Onions
Roast Veal, Dressing
Poast Beef, Yorkshire Pudding
Spanish Pork Chops
Veal Chop Suey with Rice
Mashed or Oven Fried Potatoes
Wilted Lettuce, Peas
1ce Cream, Cake, Jello
Custard, Pie
Coffee, Tea, Milk
40c

WANT ADS PAY

Associa ted Press Photo

_.

Phi Epsilon Kappa meets in the.
Union at 7:30 p.m. Room number
will be posted on the bulletin board. I C X OM T
Election of officers.
Comedy Club: Important meeting
to elect officers for next year will ____
be held in the League at 4:30 p.m.
Everyone should also bring one Members of Faculty, Graduates,

dollar in order to sign up for picnic.
Senior Society meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
at Helen Newberry. All absences
must be excused.
Polonia Circle meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan League. Professor Wood
will speak.
Varsity Band: Report in uniform
at 5 o'clock at Ferry Field, for the
R.O.T.C. review. A truck will leave
Morris Hall at 5 o'clock with the
heavy instruments.-
Michigan Union CommitteemenI
and Tryouts: Short meeting at 4I
p.ma., in Room 302 Michigan Union,
Fritz Kunz, international lecturer
and traveler, will speak in Room
"D" Alumni Memorial Hall on
"Perils of a College Education" at
4:15 this afternoon. He will speak
again at 8 o'clock this evening in
the Chapel of the League on "What
Is Theosophy." The public is in-
vited to attend.
COMING EVENTS
Landscape Club: Meeting Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m., in Department
Lecture room. Miss Adams will talk
on Oriental Landscape Painting,
with slides. Announcement of the
Spring trip. Refreshments.

and Seniors Are Honored
by Engineering Group.
(Continued from Page 1)
Urban O. Oakdale, Jacob Olthoff,
James S. Owens, Francis Regan,
Reginald W. Revans, Robert S.
Rockwood, Gordon B. B. M. Sother-
land, Joseph F. Thomson, Kenneth
B. Thomson, Gregory S. Timoshen-
ko, Samuel G. Trepp, Edwin A.
Uelling, Ehrhardt H. Wagner,
Donald A. Wilbur, Robert B. Wit-
mer, and Allan D. Wooley.
Arthur Ades, Charles H. Ander-
con, Jr., Laurence M. Ashley, Deris
A. Bach, Albin N. Benson, Arthur
F. Bernhart, Gail P. Brewington,
Jean 3rierley, Henry L. Byeriay,
William S. Carlson, Oren C. Cessna,
David C. Chandler, Elmer P. Cheat-
um, Marie E. Cimini, Elzada U.
Clover, and Harvey DeBruine.
Armando DiGiulio, Helen W. Dod-
son, Donald W. Douglass, Gerald E.
Eddy, Reuben Eschmeyer, George T.
Faust, Marselio G. Fontana, Carl
0. Grassl, Miriam G. Groner, Leon
Gropper, Elizabeth R. Halfert, Min-
nie M. Hiulton, George M. Hebbard,
Carl E. Hoffman, Howard C. Hoyt,
Paul 0. Huss, James Jamieson,
George H. Kelker, Thomas S. Knapp,
John D. Kraus, and Chester A. Law-
son.
Leonard A. Logan, Mae Mac-
Neill, William W. McCormick, Don
M. McCutcheon, Stanley J. Meisen-
burg, Peter J. Merkus, Jr., Henry
Meyer, Ernest L. Miner, Harold V.
Nyland, Charles R. Owens, Lasetta
K. Pickard, Evans S. Schmeling,
Mary E. Schmidt, Clarence A. Sie-

Mrs. Reginald Hargreaves, the
original Alice of Lewis Carroll's imn-
mortal tale, "Alice insWonderland,"
arrived in New York aboard the
Berengaria. Now nearly 80 years
old, she is attending the Lewis Car-
roll centenary celebration at the
Columbia university.
YELLOW'S RED?
Walls Give Us Some Optical
Data That's Interesting.
Although we're not aware of it,
eveiything we see is through a
screen of yellow, and when you get
mad it changes color and that's
why we see red.
Dr. Gordon L. Walls at the Uni-
versity museums, has been workin
in collaboration with Harold D.
Judd, a Detroit physical optician,
gathering facts proving that man
has in his eyes a yellow net-work
of capillaries in the retina, in front
of the visual-cell layer, and also a
yellow pigmentation of the fovea of
the retina, where these capilaries
are lacking.
Dilation of these capillaries in
anger changes their color from yel-
low to red.
bert, Robert L. Smith, Robert W.
Smith, Karl A. Stiles, Clarence M.
Tarzwell, James H. Taylor, Stephen
F. Urban, Guy L. Verse, Howard R.
Wilson, James E. Wilson, Kuang
Wu, Ta-You Wu, and Ralph E.
Yeatter.
Seniors: Marshall Anderson, By-
ron C. Coats, Harry E. Chesebrough,'
Francis H. Emerson, Allison B.
Evans, Joel A. Jannenga, William
Mikulas, Gary Muffly, James B.
Robertson, Jr., Sidney Swan, Emil
S. Tamm, William B. Tippy, August
G. Trometer, Herbert E. Vaughan,
Lawrence C. Whitsit, Edward G.
Yee, and William H. Yenni, Jr.

4

of Being

EAR NEST"

I

One of the most killingly funny shows ever written.
Call 6300
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
All Seats 75 Cents

1

A Theatre Party 18 in Order ...
Fraternities and sororities will find Play Produc-
tion's play a complete solution for the problem of
what-to-do with Mother and Dad this week end;
Oscar Wilde's Brilliant Concoction
"The IMPORTANCE

SITE AEPRICES OF

Suits!

A variety of shades .
patterns.

a wide range of

NOTICE!

The Exhibition of Antiquities from Seleucia will be augmented by
w materials of the past season's work from Seleucia and from Sep-
oris in Palestine. Main floor lobby of the Architectural building. Open
)m 3 a.m., on Friday, and Saturday.

Pegasus: Tryout and practice for
horse show Saturday. Meet in the
League at 10 a.m. Be prompt.

All Crew Members, Supervisors,
Team Captains and Student sub-
scription salespeople who wish to
avail themselves of the opportunity
for free scholarship's made possible
through the courtesy of the National
Magazine Publisher's again this year
are requested to apply to the national
organizer M. Anthony Steele, Jr.,
Box 244, San Juan, Porto Rica, stat-
ing qualifications fully.

$25;00
Extra trousers............. $5.00
' /

Hats!

EVENTS TODAY
The Geographical and Geological
Journal Club: Prof. L. C. Karpinski
will give an illustrated lecture on
"Early Maps of America," at 8 p.m.,
in Room 4058 N.S.
T Y P E W R I T I N G
.UIMEOGRAPHING
? tiy nd neaty done in
our ounz shlO by coetent
o era.tors at=deR rates.
8. D. U R RI L L:

RUSS MORGAN

and his orchestra at

THIE LEAGUE

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
1932 Dramatic Season
5 Weeks-MAY 23 to JUNE 25-6 Plays
VVIOLET HEMING
in "There's Always Juliet"
4PATRICIA COLLI4GE
in "Candida"

Pastel shades in light weight felt

3s50

li

Friday 9 till 1

Friday 9 till 1

Specials!

.,.

S. State St.,Ann Arbor.

F;

SPECIAL PRICE FOR NEXT 30 DAYS-
ENGRAVING
We shall be pleased to show you our excellent line of
VISITING CARDS,
WEDDING AND SOCIAL STATIONERY
PLATE PRINTING PROMPTLY DONE

.MARTHA GRAHAM
in 2 Dance Recitals

Shirtcaft Shirts

.$1.15

3 for $3.25

*GEOFFREY KERR
in*The Animal Kingdom"
*VIOLET KEMBLE COOPER
in "The Vinegar Tree"
*GLENN HUNTER
in "Peter Ibbetson"

Superior Shorts ....................35c
3 for $1.00

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

Seats-$1 and $1.50; 50 and 75 cents.
SEASON TICKETS-All 6 plays for $6, $4 or $3.
HALF SEASONrTICKETS (for students only)-Any
plays for $3.50 or $2.50.
NOW ON SALE at Michigan League.

Conlin& &\etherbee

3,

118 East Washington

Downtown

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_ ._ _ __. ._. _ _ .._ v _ __.. _ ___ , I.

AY

FROLIC

B'SALLOi DANCE-FRIDAY EVENING
<lfnA rMn!s n lIF.VTcA

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