100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1932 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ar -A-.A6&
4f[
-Wt r t n

4a tMi

I

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

'ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 1932

WEATHER: Generally fair.

PRICE FIVE

Clarence Darrow (center), chief
in Honolulu, is shown with two of b
H. Massie and Mrs. Grace Fortescue
sions. Darrow has attempted to pr
when he shot Joseph Kahahawai, all

)ANTS CONFER ISHOP, DET
. DEANTO LECTURE
AT LOCL CHURCH
African Bishop, Dean O'Ferrall
to Preach at Methodist
Church Services.
DR. WATERMAN TO TALK
Will Explain Excavation Work;
Rev. Mann to Give Sermon
at St. Andrew's.
Two outstanding lecturers in the
field of religion will speak in Ann
Arbor touay. Both will have charge
of services in the First Methodist
church.
At the evening service, Bishop
Eben S. Johnson, of the Cape Town,
South Africa, area of the Methodist
Episcopal church, will lecture on
"Africans in the Making," a lecture
in the series being presented by the
church undetr the Henry Martin
Loud Lectureship Fund of the Wes-
leyan Guild. The other speaker,
who will have charge of the service
this morning, is Dean O'Ferrall of
St. Paul's Cathedral, Detroit.
AssociatedPressPhoto Sermons in Other Churches.
In other Ann Arbor churches, a
defense counsel in the Massie trial number of sermons have been pre-
his four defendants, Lieut. Thomas, pared by ministers which touch
as they left one of the court ses- u p o n interesting 'subjects. Com-
ove Massie was temporarily insane munion will beheld at St. Andrew's
leged attacker of Massie's wife. Episcopal church at 8 o'clock this
morning. The morning prayer and
sermon will be given by the Rev.
Duncan E. Mann. Rev. Merle H.
yLower Anderson's sermon for this morning
in the First Presbytefrian church is
ofring Institutions "Aftrward: Facing ]Forward with
Faith."
$5,000 to $7,499 a year have been "Faith and a Good Conscience"
reduced 72 per cent; the lower is the sermon topic of Rev. R. Ed-
salaries from $3,000 to $4,999 have ward Sayles, pastor of the First
been cut 5 per cent. The 206 in- Baptist church. A special feature
structors at Ohio State, however, will-be the explanation of excava-
who receive annual average salaries ┬░tion work in Mesopotamia by Dr.
of $2,286 will not be affected. Leroy Wateman at 6:30 o'clock.
"At Iowa, a, flat cut of 5 per cent Rev. C. A. Brauer, of St. Paul's Lu-
on all salaries for the coming year theran church, will speak on The
has already been announced. What Promise of the Resurrection" at
administration and the Regents the morning service, while a play,
th d t yh n yI Will, I Won't," will be given at
of the University of l }chgan n yMA
decide v ith relr y th tr y a gmOup of Walther
of legislative authority. I know"Christian Unity Sermon Topic.
nothing of their plans except that The sermon topic of Rev. E. C.
they will be carefully and deliber- Stellhorn, of the Zdon Lutheran
ately conceived and fair to all con- church, at the morning worship will
cerned," Rep. Pack said. be "Philadelphia the F a i t h f u
In the case of the University of church," while at Bethlehem Evan-
Illinois, no salary reductions will gelical, Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
be made next year, nor are any re- will take for his address "Christian
ductions contemplated at Minne- Unity." "Probation After Deth" is
sota. In the case of the University to be the sermon topic this morn-
of Wisconsin, where the university ing at the First Church Christ, Sci-
faces a cut by the Emergency entst. ,Rabbi Bernard Heller, at
Board, salaries will not be affected. Hillel services at 11:15 o'clock in
Minnesota's legislature actually in- the League chapel, will speak on
creased its appropriation for the The Universal Significance of
university by $50,000 per year forPassover. ,a
maintenance and $30,000 a year for Two professors in the department
the hospital. In the case of Wis- of economics will speak at the Uni-
consin, the grant 'made by the tarian Church today. This morn-
legislature of 1931 has since been ing, Prof. Z. Clark Dickinson, who
increased by an aditional appro- spent the last year in Europe, will
priation of $48,070. speak on The World Economic Dis-
1nration " At the stdiient discis-I

'CAMP FUND DRIVE
TO BE SPONSORED
BY M CLUB MEN
I Norm Daniels to Be Chairman
of Campaign; Camp to Open
in June for Twelfth Time.
QUOTA IS SET AT $2,000
Will Take Care of Over 400
Under-Priveleged Children
of Detroit Vicinity.
For the twelfth year, a Univer-
sity Fresh Air camp on Patterson
lake, one of two of its kind in the
United States, at which under-priv-
ileged boys are provided with a two-
weeks stay, will be sponsored by the
Student Christian Association. It
will open in June and, as in past
years, a tag day on the campus will
be held May 11, with ihembers of
the "M" Club in charge of their
distribution.
Norman J. Daniels, '32Ed., of De-
troit, captain of the 1931-32 basket-
ball\ team, has been appointed
chairman of the student drive, the
quota of which is $2,000. The goal
set for the maintenance of the
camp this summer is $1,000 less
than last year, but will in no way
force a curtailment of activities or
a restriction in the number of boys
attending the camp, Daniels be-
lieves.
400 Campers.
Present plans as outlined by the
Student Christian Association pro-
vide for the caring of 400 or more
under-privileged children, the ma-
jority of whom are children of ex-
tremely poor parents and coming
mainly fromthe congested districts
in and near Detroit. Last summer
407 boys attended the camp, found-
ed in 1921 by Louis C. Reimann '16,
eof Ann Arbor, then on the staff of
the Student Christian Association.
A circular letter, signed by Presi-
dent Ruthven, head of the board
of corporation trustees of the camp,
and directed to student organiza-
tions, fraternities and sororities on
the cam, is to be placed in the
m1i within a few day , aniels
said.
Alder to Be Director.
George :G. Alder, Grad., of Ann
Arbor, will direct th'e work at the
camp this summer. He succeeds T.
R. Hornberger, instructor In the de-
partment of English.
Endorsements of the camp have
been made by prominent members
of the faculty and leaders of civic
and welfare associations in the
metropolitan area. They have been
received from President Ruthven;
Prof. F. N. Menefee, of the engi-
neering college, chairman of the
camp committee; G. W. Gillis, '16
LLB, president, Edson, Moore and
Co., Detroit; A. D. Jamieson,'10
BCE, vice-president of the Union
Guardian Trust Co., Detroit, and
Dr. John M. Dorsey, professor of
psychiatry and a member of the
staff of the tate Psychopathic
Hospital of the niversity.
The camp period is divided into
four periods of 12 days each. The
first period will begin in June.
Water is the camp's attraction, with
swimming I e s s o n s and boating
cruises features of the day's activi-
ties. A similar camp is maintained
by the University of Pennsylvania.
The present camp site was secured
in 1924, a gift of M. A. Ives and H.
B. Earhart. Boys attending the
camp are selected by a score of so-
cial welfare and charity organiza-
tions in and around Detroit.
STUDENTS AND FAC

DISCUSS IDEAL
By James H. Inglis i
Stimulated by a barrage of ques-
tions relevent and irreleven, rang-
ing from "What is the use of
ideals?" to "Do athletics and jazz
orchestras play a part in the stu-
d e n t's spiritual experience?" a
handful of faculty members met
the challenge of more than 200 stu-
dents who gathered in a parley on
the third floor of the Union in an
effort to seek out the real meaning
or excuse for life.
The high point of student inter-
est seemed to be reached at the
close of last night's session with
the centering of the discussion
around the proposition: "What is
good?" and "Why should we be
good?" Putting aside the immedi-
ate good for the ultimate good is,
the reason for observing the ordin-
ary codes of personal conduct, ac-
cording to Prof. Preston F. Slosson,
of the history department, who set'
forth his own philosophy of ilfe
in clear-cut terms.

NEW CANDIDATE'

TIMELY

IDEF EA

ILLINIS,_4 TO0
Waterbor Handles
Chances Without
aSlip.
WROBKE FANS

1

Associated Press Photo
Dr. Henry Hoffman, 81, of Omaha,
was nominated as the "progressive"
party's candidate for president by
a "convention" of seven men in
Omaha.
ALIENISTS TESTIFY'
MASSIE ''2AS SAt~NE
Los Angeles Psychiatrist Tells
Jury He Believes Slaying
Was Premeditated.
HONOLULU, April 23.-(,P)-Two
alienists testified for the prosecu-
tion today that Lieut' Thomas H.j
Massie was sane when he allegedly
fired the shot that killed Joseph
Kahahawai.
Massie had testified his mind
went blank when he stood before
Kehalawai with a pistol and heard
the native confess attacking his
wife, Mrs. Thalie Massie. The naval
officer said he remembered nothing
thereafter until after being taken
to the police station subsequent to
his arrest.
Drenied the privilege of examining
Massie because of objections by
Clarence Darrow, leader of the de-
fense, Dr. Paul Bowers, Los Angeles
psychiatrist, expressed his 'opinion
on the stand after studying the
records in the case and after sev-
eral defense objections had been
overruled.
Dr. Bowers expressed belief that
the kidnapping and slaying of Ka-
hahawai had been premeditated by
Massie and three other defendants,
Mrs. Granville Fortescue, his moth-
er-in-law, and Albert O. Jones and1
E. J .Lord,.enlisted men in the
navy.
Jury Return Awaited
by Flint Defendants

But Michigan Hits i
pinches to Down
Champions.
By Sheldon C. Fullerton
When the team is hitting, an
when Harley McNeal can pull him
self out of tight situations as we
as he did yesterday, it doesn'tmat
ter much who the Wolverines ma
be playing. Yesterday the Wester
Conference champions from Illi
ois happened to be the unluck
party, with the result that 'th
lanky Michigan right-hander seI
them home smarting under a 4 t
1 defeat.
Good as McNeal was, it took mor
than good pitching to stop the I
lini. And that extra punch, in ad
dition to the timely thunder car
ried in the Wolverine bats, was sup
plied by a brand new made-to-o
der shortstop by the name of Sta
Waterbor, who came up from la
year's freshman team to make
real name for himself in his fir
game of Big Ten baseball.
Stars at Short.
Waterbor stole the show, and wo
himself into the fans' favor at th
same time. He handled 10 chance
down at short. Seven of them we
grounders, and not all of them we
easy chances, but it seemed to mak
little difference to the Michiga
sophomore, who handled them a
and sandwiched in three putou
besides to do more than his sha
of taming the visitors.
Harley McNeal granted the Ir
dians only eight hits, but he ha
his job cut out for him. He w
pitted against Wrobke, who too
the hill for the visitors after the:
star twirler, Ga-ga Mills, had work
ed eight innings in t h e garr
against Ohio State Firiday afte
-noon. Wrobke justified his sele
tion by setting 11 of the Wolverin
down on strikes, but when mi
were on bases he had a tough tir
in keeping the Maize and Blue ba
ters from giving the ball a ride.P
that, he w o u I d have scrap
through with only two runs beir
scored against him except for sor
errors on the part of Gbur ar
Frink. Both of these men commi
ted two bobbles apiece. They we
guilty of wild heaves to the pla
that let in Michigan runners.

WOLVERI1NES HI,

'would otner salaries are approximaty i
the same as in the other institu-
until tions.
future Group Includes Hospital Staff.
mittee Michigan's group of professors
k per includes men on the hospital staff,
all th however, it was pointed out, and
g andif only the salaries paid by the
University and not by the hospital
clay to and trust funds were considered, it
's and dwould be found that the average
'y were salary for professors at Michigan
Lima would be lower than at the other
efeller. schools.
ol was sm The action of Michigan's legis-
narket lature in curtailing the University's
aths appropriations for .1932-33, has
R broht to the foregr6und the ques-
tion of faculty salaries, and it was
in answer to numerous requests for
Lfurther information that Rep. Pack
accumulated information concern-
ing the other state universities.
"Th e condition faced by the Uni-
versity at this time is one with
which other comparable institu-
[uction tions have already struggled or
ess with which they must cope in the
near future," Representative Pack
stated. "At Ohio State University,
for example, the legislature has
it con curtailed appropriations for 1932-
charge 33 to such an extent that the fol-
Mtor lowing salary scale for the coming
as the fiscal year has already been an-
ill-En- nounced:
to be Salaries Cut at Ohio State.
Tues-
as an "Those receiving in excess of
I Parr, $7,500 a year have been cut 10 per
ein- cent; those salaries ranging from'

COLLEGE SPORTS
BASEBALL
Iowa State 10, Minnesota 4
Wisconsin 12, Northwestern 5
Chicago 3, Ohio State 2
Luther 3, Michigan State 1
Carleton 11, Iowa 10 (10 innings).
GOLF
Ohio State 1212, Illinois 4%12
TRACK
Ohio State 96, Pittsburgh 29
Michigan State 110, Detroit City
College 21
Michigan Normal 92, Chicago 39

sion group at 7:30 o'clock tonight.
Prof. Margaret Elliott will lead a
discussion on the problem of the
warring Orient.

'CITY I
TO CC

ICUE HEAD
f0 LOND ON

H. D. Smith Named by Hoover
as U.S. Delegate to Meeting
of Local Authorities.
Harold D. Smith, of Ann Arbor,
director of the Michigan Munici-
pal League, has been appointed by
President Hoover as one of the 12
delegates who will represent the
United States at the International
Congress of Local Authorities that
will meet May 23-26 in London, it
was learned yesterday through an
announcement of the Michigan]
Municipal League.
Approximately 35 countries, in-
Ludin the United% . Sta.tes Iand

INCREASED ATTENDANCE AT UNION
FUNCTIONS REPORTED BY COUNCIL

BAY CITY, April 23. - (P) - Six
days of testimony and argument
completed this noon, defendants in-
the Flint conspiracy trial tonight
were awaiting return of the jury
from its deliberations.
The defendants are William H.
McKeighan, mayor of Flint; Police
Chief Caesar J. Scavarda; Detective
Sgt. Ben F. Baker and Al Vergo
The jury, after hearing testimony'
of nearly two score witnesses under i
questioning and cross-examinatiorn|
by eight attorneys, was given the
case at just before noon recess, and
after lunch began its deliberationsI
at 1:40 o'clock.
ULTY MEMBERS
S AT UNION PARLEY
one's fellows demands that the
good of the group be a factor in de-
termining the action of the individ-
ual.
Prof. Roy Sellers, of the philoso-
phy department, took up the same
controversial subject with the plea
for each person to define good for
himself in what ever manner he
considered was most conductive to
his getting out of life what he most
desired. Professor Sellers sharply
criticised the traditiopal practice
of accepting as good what was
handed down from the church or
Sother institution. We must sharply
L define in our minds what we want
and not be the creature of impulse
and the desire of the moment, he
stressed.
Most persistent among the stu-
dent contributors to the parley wasl
Leonard Kimball, '32, who challeng-
ed Prof. I. L. Sharfman, of the de-
partment of economics, to explain
why his department taught an eco-
nomic system which allowed certain

Two Wolverines go Hitless.
Of the Michigan batters, ont
'Mike Diffley and Ken Manuel faile
to hit. Manuel was easy picking fc
Wrobke all afternoon, the succes
sor to Solly Hudson whiffing fou
times and connecting with only on
good ball, that a foul, all afternoor
Artz, Tompkins, and Daniels eac
poled out two hits apiece, whil
everybody else managed to connec
once.
'o Art Superko went the doubtft
honor of clouting the first 'Confei
ence home run of the year, onl
to be declared out and having hi
hit cut to a double after circlin
the bases and getting all of the wa
to the Michigan dugout. In the sec
(Continued on Page 3)
BOX SCORE
MICHIGAN AB R H PO A
Ferguson, if ...,...3 1 1 0 0
Waterbor, ss .....,.3 1 1 3 7
Artz, rf ...........4 . 1 2 3 0
Tompkins, cf .....4 0 2 0 0
Diffley, c .... .. 4 0 0 2 0
Superko, 3b ......4 0 1 0 6
Daniels, 2b,.......4 0 2 2 0
Manuel, lb......4 0 0 17 0
McNeal, p.... .3 1 1 0 2
Totals ........33 4 10 27 15

lobby, according to Edward Kuhn, Canada, are to be represented. The
'33, recording secretary. These are delegation from the United States
available to those who have been will be sponsored by the American
on the campus for four years. Mem- Municipal Association.
bership cards must be presented. Following the meeting in London
Among the new projects which the American delegation plans to
the Union has inaugurated this make a month's tour of the con-
year are the class B bowling tour- tinent in order to study problems
nament, the contract bridge tour- of European municipalities and the
nament, the bridge lecture, the in- methods by which they are solved.
tercollegiate billiard tournament of
which Michigan was the winner, Lunt to Discuss Bahai
the historical museum, the Sunday Movement on Tuesday
afternoon concerts, the freshman
luncheon club, the upperclass ad- Alfred Lunt, national secretary of
visory system, and the presidential f the Bahai movement, will discuss
poll. the Bahai program and philosophy4

ILLIN6IS AB
Gbur, 2b ........5
Tryban, ss ....,... 4
Frink, cf .......,..5
Schustek, If ......5
Steuernagel, rf .. .2
Wahl, 3b ........ 4
Yule, lb ... ...... 3
Mills, lb .......... 1
Chervinko, c.......2
Toncoff, c ...... .. 2
Wrobke, p ....... 3

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

HI
1
3
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

P0
2'
0
4
1
1
2
4
0
5
5
0

A]
1~
0
0
0

1
n

Totals ........36 1 8324 5
Score by innings:
Illinois .........001 0000000-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan