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March 31, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

io

THE MICHIGAN DAILY__

OOSEVELT ON JOB IN MANILA

I IJV i DLIEU
SiH JAPANESE
1EYS CONIU

STUDENT IS PROMINENT PIANIST Hopwood Winner Is
Author of New Novel
(Editor's Note: This is the third theatre. Morin, who will be grad T
of a series of articles on outstand- uated this year has had a long and That a winner of one of the prizes
ing stidents who are interesting interesting career as a musician of last year's Hopwood contest has
themselves in other than ordinary and will become. according to crit- written well enough to be consider-

NOW PLAYING
STRANGLER OF
BLONDE SIREN
BREAKS DOWN

Nipponese Military Authorities
Report Sharp Skirmish
at Chiawangmiao. f
NEGOTIATORS DISAGREE
Japs Charge Chinese Delegates
Lack Responsibility
and Authority.
SHANGHAI, March 30.-(A)--A
sharp skirmish between Japanese
and 'Chinese forces at Chiawang-'
milao took place. today, according
to Japanese military authorities,
punctuating a lull in the peace par-
leys which are slated to be resifn-
ed again Thursday.
The Japanese said the Chinese1
were driven to the south side ofE
Soochow creek, on the north side of
~which they were reported last week
to have been digging trenches and
erecting defenses. The Japanese
notified British authorities then
that drastic measures might have
to be taken to force the Chinese to
observe the limits fixed by Gen.
Ukeda's ultimatum of last Febru-
ary.
Peace Efforts Failing.
The Japanese peace negotiators,1
charged the parleys were being de-'
layed because the Chinese delegates
lacked responsibility and, authority
to make decisions and the Chinese
countered with a charge that the
Japanese were trying to break up
the conference.
Chinese officials expressed strong
resentment against the tactics of
the Japanese, charging they were
trying to throw responsibility forI
the deadlock 'on the Chinese.
"The fundamental issue is the
withdrawal of the Japanese troops
from Chinese territory," said a
statement issued through the Chi-
nese official Kuo-Min news agency,
"but the Japanese refuse to negoti-
ate for its realization. It seems they
intend to maintain an army of oc-
cupation in the Chinese territory
adjacent to Shanghai indefinitely."
Japs Blame Chinese.
The Chinese press featured re-
ports that the peace conference was
doomed to collapse. Other obser-
vers also expressed the belief that
the breach between the negotiators
was widening.
Five Japanese soldiers were
wounded when two motor trucks on
the way to the front lines struck
submnerged mines near Kating? The
Japanese said the Chinese honey-
combed a wide area in that section
with explosives before they re-
treated.
Tapping Is Chairman
of Alumni Committee

activities. The fourht will appear ics, a concert artist of note when ed more than an amateur novelist,
in an early issue.) he goes on the platform.syh "
Befoe hecoul remmber sois shown by the fact that "The Mad
t4Jerry E. Rosenthal.er ,Morin says, he began playing the by Lon Beers as p
Byo'lokished by E. P. utton and Coi-
At 4:5 o'lockthis afternoon, piano and with the support of his pn n eiwdls eki h
Raymond Morin, one of the best parents and others has continued
Aknown young pianists in the coun- his studies under five different Herald Tribune.
try will give his fifth and final Ann teachers in the United States and ibne.
Arbor recital in Lydia Mendelssohn abroad. Miss Ber, a adatednt
_____________here last year, was awarded one of
Morim s concert career began the $1,500 prizes in the Hopwood
when he was 11 years old with sev- contest. Several copies of her book,
Cl2te A t Society aeral recitals in his home town of which sells for $2.50, are available
Soonsors Exhibitions Fitchburg. Mass., and surrounding at Wahr's book store
__cities. With the years, his fame
f . spread and today, besides his con-
Bringing to Ann Arbor exhibi- certs in Ann Arbor he has given
tioni of paintings, etchings or recitals all over Michigan, Ohio
sculpture, is only one of many ac- Pennsylvania, New York and New
tivities undertaken by the College England.
Art association.tThis organization When he began his study of the
fis sponsored by the schools and col-pinhtumehsfrtkysa
tot andthe New England Conservatory in
leges throughout the eastern Boston under Motte-Lacroix. Grad-' M
Associated PressPhotro central states, the University of uating from that institution, Morin DETR LT, MICH.
One of the first official acts of Theodore Roosevelt jr. after his in- Michigan included, which partici- came under the tutelage of An-
pate in and support its programs. toinette Czumowska, and then went STARTING FRIDAY
auguration as governor-general of the Philippines was to inspect the In addition to its exhibition pro- to New York city, where Charles
constabulary. He is shown being escorted in front of troops at Manila. gram the College Art association Naegele became his instructor. WEEK OF A.PRIL 1st
'publishes "Eastern Art," an annual Since his entrance into the School
Physical EducationIExhibit to Be Given Artainuing ato OrinataertvTed of Music in 1928, Morin has studied RADIO'S MOST POPULAR
Exhibitt Blletin," an quarrly dev d under Albert Lockwood, professor RAJA H OF RONiANTIC
by Clements Library tonresearch; and marassse a of piano, to whom he atributes any RHYTHM!
Liberality Helped __ monthly ilustrated magazine of in- interpretative skill, he has. Last
~ Sdugn 9 dn "Washingtoniana," a n exhibit teesummeandcriticainnter he studied under the noted
by Wisconsin iscn nDeantertionasepliwsaincreisticite-
commemorating the 200th anniver- et.dThese puslcation ed bs Alexander Brailowsky in Paris. He
sary of the birth of George Wash- and are not offered for eneral sale. has the distinction of being, the
and e nort oferdsfogrverelal sleonly pupil Brailowsky has ever had.,W Wn
ita dn arorafwith thp

U-...

I

I

MADISON, Wis., March 30.-An-'
other thread in the growing list of
discriminations in favor of physical
extra-curricular activities came to

light recently at the University of
Wisconsin, when Scott H. Good.
night, dean of men, and members
of the athletic board justified the
awarding of basketball "W's" to 0.
Dwight Swan and Stanley Rewey
despite the fact that both Swan
and Rewey were ineligible for com-
petition since the opening of the
second semester.
In an open letter to Pres. Glenn
Frank of the university, Samuel
Steinman, executive editor of the
Daily Cardinal, student publication,
urged him to take the matter in his
own hands, declaring that Dean
Goodnight had failed to keep faith
with the student body, that the
same dean had been instrumental
in attracting many to the univer-
sity for his same liberal interpre-
tation of athletic ineligibility stan-
dards, and that although the mat-
ter may seem trivial to the presi-
dent of the university, it is of ex-
treme importance to the student
body and since The Daily Cardinal
had always defended the president
for his interest in the student body
now was the time for him to prove
his interest.
HOOVER ELECTED
PRESIDENT AGAIN
Herbie Is the Man for the Job,
According to Straw Votes.
Whether the avalanche of straw
votes and polls that are being held
today in regards to the presidential
situation means anything or not,
Pathfinder, a national weekly pub-
lished in Washington, reports its
results of a 235,00 balloting for the
next man to lead the country.
Results indicate a' continued pref-
erence for Herbert Hoover above all
others, leading with a total of 115,-
042 as compared with Governor
Roosevelt wAo amassed 49,626. John
Garner, speaker of the House, was
third with 16,956, and Al Smith
fourth with 12,299.
Other results were: William , A.
Murray, 11,541; William E. Borah,
4,387; Governor Ritchie, 2,954;
Newton D. Baker, 2,780; Senator
Johnson, 2,130; Calvin Coolidge, 1,-
942; Gifford E. Pinchot, 1,213; Sen-
ator Norris, 1,036; Norman Thom-
as, 948; James A. Reed, 656; William
McAdoo, 553; Senator Robinson,
474; Owen D. Young, 449.

mngon in accoraance wi n
e Besides many excellent press re-
Washington bi-centennial, will fea- Boak to Leave.Egypt views, Morin has a number of oth-
ture the contribution of William L. Expedition in April er records. In his freshman year,
Clements library to the annual _ _he made Phi Eta Sigma, freshman
Spring Homecoming ,to be held May Word has been received here that scholastic honorary society and was
6, 7, and 8, in Ann Arbor. Prof. A. E. R. Boak, chairman of elected president of the freshman
Journals, maps, letters, and other the history department, who has music school class. Last year he
literary incidentals of the first been at the University expedition at was awarded a $250 scholarship by
president's career are included in Karanis, Egypt, this winter, will the School and this year was fur-
this display, which is the only one leave Egypt about the first of April. ther honored by having Mason and
of its kind in the middle west. Of Professor Boak, who is accom- Hamlin piano company ask him for}
special interest is a journal, printed panied by Mrs. Boak and their his testimonial on theirinstrument.
in 1754, whch was kept by Wash- daughter, plans to sail for Italy and Morin has already g i v e n 67
ington on his journey in the winter to spend a few weeks there before broadcasts over the University ra-
of 1753-54 to the French command- going to England for a short per- dio station. Last spring his article
ant at Fort Le Boeuf, now Water- iod. on "Piano Technique 'was accepted
ford, Pa. There is also an original He will return to Ann Arbor in by Musical Observer.
letter, written by Washington at time to teach in the Summer Ses- After he finishes school this June, I
Valley Forge, and an early printed sion. Because of climatic condi- Morin expects to study for a year
edition of his will. tions in Egypt during the summer and in 1934 make his debut as a
Dr. Randolph G. Adams, director it is customary to close the camp concert artist. He will begin work
of the library, has added special in the late spring. on his program for this debut im-
visiting hours from 9 to 12 o'clock __mediately. _
on Friday and Saturday mornings, Mild weather is encouraging Ken-
May 6 and 7. The regular hours tucky turkeys to start their nests
are from 2 to 5 o'clock weekdays, preparatory to a big crop of
and from 3 to 5 o'clock on Sundays. Thanksgiving fowl.
FOR RENT
IL rn n~n C)C( n 7- n 1111

LOP EZ
AND HIS HOTEL ST.
REGIS ORCHESTRA
and
B R O A D W A Y

Nora Selmer, beautiful
victim of sensational
love-nest murder, whose
slayer broke down under
the strain of police
grilling this morning.
He confessed that jealous
ft ide-aWay be
-
Fox Picture
with
LIONEL ATWILL
Greta Nissen
Bramwell Fletcher
Also
Smith and Dale
Boris Minnevitch
SATURDAY
WQS SQADPAY
-ATAD A

STAR

.REVUE

Hear tantalizing tunes and
intriguing melodies! Dancers,
singers, comics!
THEATRE, DETROIT'

V U!

.

mi

T. Hawley Tapping, general sec-
tary of the Alumni association
id editor of the Michigan Alum-
us, was recently appointed to the.1
aairmanship o f the magazine|
wards committee of the Americarf,
lumni council, it was learned at
le Alu-ni office yesterday.
Tapp&- 's colleagues on this com-
ittee are Miss Jeannette Calkins.
: the University of Oregon and
:iss Jane Butchart of the Univer-
ty of Denver.
The duties of the committee con-
st of awarding prizes to the best
uumni magazines for excellence in
ctorial covers, typographical cov-
's, presentation in word and pic-
re of a college ceremony, and sim-
ar projects.
Mrs. Nellie J. Gill of Columbus,
., has ridden 75,000 miles piloting
er own motorcycle.

NOTICE
EXPERIENCED w o m a n wishes
work as cook in fraternity house.
Can give references. Phone 3732.
562
FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES-
This weelp end party your piano
should be tuned. Phone 6776,
Victor Allinendinger. Exclusive
piano tuner for the School of,
Music and concert artists. Not,
connected with any music house.
Office at residence, 1608 Morton
Ave. 563
WANTED
TYPING-Grad. theses a specialty.
M. V. Hartsuff. 9087.
526c
MOE LAUNDRY
204 North Main Phone 3916
The Tale of a Shirt, "A good, care-
ful, tiorough, laundry. 200c

AN UNUSALLY desirable office for
attorney, doctor, dentist, or engi-
neer. Now available in First Na-
tional Bank Bldg. For informa-
tion call bank office. 560c
FURNISHED apartment with pri- !
vate bath and shower. Cross
ventilation. Also double and sin-'
gle room. Steam heat, shower,
garage. Dial 8544. 422 E. Wash-
ington. 56kc
FOR SALE
RPOSSESSED CARS-Buy from'
Finance Company for balance
due. We sell all makes of new
cars at a discount. Investigate.
311 W. Huron. Phone 22001. 235c
LOST
LOST - Xi Psi Phi farterni-ty pin
with the name D. H. Colvin en-
gravced on back. Finder please call

MIDDLE

WESTERN'

The followingcolleges are emets f special news

exclusive to

bureau dispensing news of interest to universitystu-

dents.

Only through THE MIC iIGAN DAILY

and the followin member schools can
these news pieces.

youl

receive

SCHOOLS

E

v 8517. Reward.
10

I ~I L'overs--mayJLiss ... I

THE DAILY ILLINI
Champaign, Illinois
THE DAILY NORTHWESTERN
Evanston, Illinois
THE INDIANA DAILY STUDENT
Bloomington, Indiana.

Ai

TAILORED
down to the
latticed detail
Fashion is trimmed down for
tailoredSpring-down to the last
detail. And, on this slim little ox-
ford, the detail is very new-
of French :extraction--a lattice

THE PURDUE EXPONENT
Lafayette, Indiana
THE DAILY IOWAN
Iowa City, Iowa
THE U OF MINNESOTA
Minneapolis, Minnesota

THE OHIO STATE LANTERN
Columbus, Ohio
THE WISCONSIN DAILY CARDINAL
Madison, Wisconsin
THE DAILY TAR HEEL
hapel Hill, N. C.
THE UNIVERSITTY OF CHICAGO MAROON

design that gives vent to the feel-
ing of openness, characteristic of
the cross-bar effects and basket
weaves dii lheinew woolens.

4

Chica-c, Illinois

AND

Evon--Black Kid-$8.50

1

BURTON'S

11

11E ad N 416 _

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