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March 30, 1932 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-30

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THE MICHICAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

MVA up

i

Glendora

Gosling

1Vonliinated

to Head

W.A.A.

I

History of

Soro

nit

ies

ELECT NAN DIEBEL
TO FILL ASSISTANT
PUA iOMA m post

Society
Alumnae House.

TO HLD ANNUAL.
DEBATE IN APRIL
Zeta Phi Eta and Athena Will

CHI OMEGA

.[By Margaret O'Brien]

l

Miss Barnard, social director of Discuss Social Sororities.
Alumni house left Friday on a nine
day tour to Bermuda. Miss Alice
Twamley is taking her place. In the annual debate between
Athena and Zeta Phi Eta, women's
Betsy Barbour.

I

Founded in a period when north-- ; carnation, the colors, cardinal and U 111IHIEIIN" Ud
ern fraternities declined to enter ' straw, and the open motto is "Hel-
southern colleges, Chi Omega car- lenic culture and Christian ideals."
aried out its policy of. emphasizing Altruistic work is carried on by Members of Committees Are
nationalism in its extension, in an the individual chapters, but several Named at Meeting
effort to develop diversity of char- national projects have been put in- of Chairmen.
acter and ability in its members. It to effect. One of the most important
came into existence April 5, 1895, at was the donation of a Greek open FEW PLACES STILL OPEN
the University of Arkansas, in Fay- air theatre to the University of Ar-FT
etteville, all of its early chapters kansas to commemorate the found-
being placedi in surrounding states. ing of the fraternity. Another ac- Freshmen Participate in Efforts'
The founders were five in num- tivity is the annual presentation of to Organize Pageant
ber, and included Ina Mae Boles, an achievement award to an Amer-
Jean Vincenheller, Allie Simmons, ican woman who has done the most Program.
Jobelle Holcombe, and Dr. Charles outstanding work in the fields of P r
Richardson, a Kappa Sigma. Al- the professions, arts, public affairs, I With the election of Nan Diebel
though the first chapters were letters, business and finance, or ed- as assistant chairman of the cen-'
southern, the fraternity soon began ucation. The committee which tral group, the committee in charge
Hu spreaa, and now tas a i,:a&i makes the selection includes wo- of the Freshman pageant has now
even distribution. It has the larg- men who are foremost in their own U
est chapter roll of any women's fra- fields of activity. Among them are been completed. At a meeting of
ternity, the present total being Dr. Beatrice M. Hinkle, representing committee heads yesterday after-3
eighty-nine. the professions, Mrs. Franklin D. noon in Barbour Gym, the vacant
Chi Omega was the first to estab- Roosevelt, the field of public af- place on the central committee was
lish and maintain a national ex- fairs, Mrs. Laura Garden Fraser, filled, and all members of other
ecutive office, its activities being theatres, Dean Marjorie Nicolson,
centered at Cincinnati, from where letters, Mary Vail Andress, business committees were named and ap -
The Eleusis, the quarterly maga- and finance, and Elizabeth Dyer, proved.
zine, is issued. education. Members of the dance committee
The badge is composed of the Prominent alumnae of the frater- are: Barbara Sutherland. chair-
Greek symbols for the name super- nity include Mabel Walker Wille- man; Norma Caro, Katherine An-
imposed, the Chi being surmounted brandt, former- assistant attorney- ning, Virginia Roberts, Lucille
with fourteen pearls. The pledge general of the United States, Gene- Betz, and Marie Metzger. The mem-
pin is oval shaped, black enamel be- vieve Taggard, editor, critic and po- bership of this most important of
ing the background for the Greek et, who is the recipient of the Gug- the committees is not yet complete,
letters. The flower is the white genheim foundation award f o r but additional elections will be an-
__ r-- 1931-32, Marjorie Nicolson, Dean of nounced at an early date

A light supper was served by the speech societies, the question of
Freshmen girls of letsy Barbour to whether social sororities and fra-
honor t-ie Jun r; r'onday n,ht ternities should be abolished from
upon their r-urn from "No Man's the Michigan campus, will be dis-
Tc'

Colegiatc Sorosis.
Collegiate Sor o s i s entertainelt
their junior .nembers at a supper
given by the seniors Monday ni -ht
afit the Junio,: Girls' Play. The
serving was doe by the Sopho-
mores. Roses were used in the dec-
ra lion.

.i

I-Iecen Ne'wbe'rr .

cussed. This discussion will be held
in April.
At the try-outs held last week by
Athena for the debate team which
will represent them in the contest,
the following women were selected:
Lucille Oldham, '32, Martha Little-
ton, '34, and Carol Hart, grad. El-
eanor Blum, '35, will act as alter-
nate. Gladys Baker, '33, is coach-,
ing the team.
Zeta Phi Eta, which will have the
negative side of the question, has
chosen these women to speak: Elva
Pascoe, '32, Helen Haapamaki, '32,
Maribel Smith, '34, and Ethel How-
ard, '35. One of these persons will
be eliminated before the debate.
Dorothy Davis, '33, is coaching this
team.

MUSIC L 'S'OR UORITY
TO HOLDUSICLE
Delta Omicron to Give Program
Honoring Alumnae Chapter,
Patronesses.
Delta Omicron, national musical
sorority, will hold a formal musicale
tonight at the home of Mrs. W. W.
Newcomb, 1425 Ferdon Road, in
honor of the alumnae chapter and
patronesses. Mrs. W. L. Badger,
Mrs. C. H. Smith, and Mrs. J. J.
Travis will act as assisting hostess-
es to Mrs. Newcomb.
The following program will be
given by Mona Hutchings, violiR-
ist: Sonata in D Major by Corelli,
in six movements; and Lombardie
Fantasie by Vientemps.
Edna Houck, pianist, will enter-
tain with Sonata Op. 2, No. 1, by
Beethoven, interpreted in three
movements.
Dorothy Benjamin, soprano, will
sing the following numbers: My
Laddie, by Thayer; and Cherry
Ripe, by Horn.

4

The seniors f :-Telen Ncwbei-y
ertertained ti'e juniors of the hose
accoring to tradition with a parry
at the Hauntal Tavern after the
performance of the Junior Girls
Play Monday night. Helen Travis
acted as toastmistress. The clasp
viiil was read bi Fleanor Rairion
o-hile va:ious members of
classes gave inpromptu speeches.
T e commett, for the affair con-
sited of Marie Cremnwald, Eleanor
- Rairdon, and Helen Travis.
UNIVERSITY CLUBS
WILL HOLD INNEsR
Attendance Will Be Restricted

I i [YLEI.[IMALTERATFON
Will change your old gowns
to new.
HEMSTITCHING-COATS RELINBD
Dial 2-1129 620 East Liberty Street
-

Smith college, who also received
R the Guggenheim award, Leta Lar-
rimore, novelist, Mrs. Mark Van
I Doren, Eleanor Campbell, artist,
Mary C. Love-Collins, attorney and
- T author of "Human Conduct and the
Law," Mary Duncan, screen actress,
Mrs.-M. Alice Bassett Hoeloman,
Zeta Phi Eta to Produce Group president of the board of regents
of Plays for Ann Arbor of the University of New Mexico,
School Children, one of two women in the country to
hold such a position, Amy Loomis,
Zeta Phi Eta, national speech so- actress, and former director of the
rZrity, prete nthelay he so-Lydia Mendelssohn theatre, and
rority, presented the play, "The Martha Guernsey Colby, head of
Knave of Hearts," by Louise Saun-
ders over the University radio sta- the child psychology department of
tion Monday afternoon. This play the university.
was-rewritten for radio presenta-
tion by Mrs. Mary Kent-Miller Ten-MW.A.A. Executives to
nant, '27, '28.wh Hold Dinner Meet ing
The women who played the three , _D________
leading roles in the play were: El- Members of the executive board
eanore M. Gilmore, '33, Billie Grif- of the Woman's Athletic Associa-
fiths, '35, and Kathryn Kunert, '33. tion will hold a dinner meeting at
Other characters were taken by: 6 o'clock tomorrow night in the
Lenore Legendre, '34, Dorothy Dav- board room of the Palmer FieldI
is, '33, Frances Thornton, '32, and House. Marjorie Hunt, '32, Eliza-z
Mary Helen McIntosh, '34. beth Cooper, 34, and Harriet Jen-
Presentation of "The Knave of nings, '34, are in charge of the din-
Hearts," marks the beginning of ner. Plans for Lantern Night which
the project which the Michigan is to be held in May will be dis-
chapter of Zeta Phi Eta will further cussed.G
during the coming semester
These plays are to be given dur-
ing April and May in the Lydia
Mendelssohn theatre on alternate
Saturday mornings for the school
children of Ann Arbor. A charge of
15c admission will be made.

The finance committee includes to Members.
Estelle Standish, chairman; Ann
Mitchell, Margaret Phalon, Dorothy The newly organized group of the
Hood, Helen Clark, Barbara Jean University of Michigan Club for
Owens, Marjorie Vernor, and Shir- Women will join with the Univer-
ley Vernor. sity of Michigan Club of Ann Ar-
The other committees are as fol- i bor in the annual dinner to be held
fa- on April 19 at the Michigan Union.
lows: music, Barbara Bates, char- Attendance at the dinner will be
man; Mary Ruth Platt, Betty Mer- restricted to members who have
cer. and Doris Gimmy; posters and paid their dues. Husbands of the
programs committee, Mary Sabin, alumnae who are not Michigan
chairman; Mary Lou Cummings, graduates may be invited to the
Jane Kauffman, Katherine Anning, dinner.
and Mary Gaylord: property cond- Reservations may be made by
mittee, Maxine Maynard, chair- teehonin s.mDonade My
man; Betty Little, Mary O'Brien. telephoning Mrs. Donald C. May,
Kathleen Carpenter, Marie Metzger, 4861, and the annual dues of one
publicity, Virginia Cluff, chairman; dollar may also be paid to Mrs.
11arion Shepard, and Betty Aigler. May.
costumes, Ruth Bradner, chair- Ms ai lewoefte
; HeTen hiRosenblast cmindtefought at Valley Forge, works daily
bella Currie. This last committee on a 200-year-old loom brought
is not yet complete. from England at her home in Perry
The freshman women participa- countOh
ting are all cooperating in the __ y, Oi
early efforts to organize the pro-_- _ __
gram, which is developing the his-
tory of civilization through the
dances of different periods. Women
taking part are asked to note the
schedule of tomorrow's practice
in the D. O. B.

r

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Manicuring

All licensed operators, carefully selected to uphold the
DiMittia reputation for efficiency; the latest offering
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for our large, fastidious clientele.
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338 South State Street

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BLONDE-$4.95-BLACK
BROWN-$5.95-BLACK
BEIGE-$5.95-BLACK

JULIETTE LIPPE ................. . .. ..Soprano
Distinguished star of Covent Garden and other opera companies
RUTH RODGERS.................. . . Soprano
Well known concert and oratorio singer
MINA HAGER ............... . . ...... .Contralto
Distinguished Oratorio Singer
BENIAMINOGIGLI ......... ........... Tenor
A Leading tenor Metropolitan Opera Company
FREDERICK JAGEL ....................."Tenor
Another leading Metropolitan Opera Company tenor
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . Baritone
America's outstanding concert and opera baritone
NELSON EDDY.......... ............Baritone
Another outstanding opera and concert singer
CHASEBAROMEO.............. . . . .Bass
Leading Bass Chicago Civic Opera Company
GITTA GRADOVA . . . t . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . Pianist
One of America's greatest piano virtuosi
PALMER CHRISTIAN . . . . . . . . . .,..,....Organist
Another fine American artist
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION................ 300 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA...........70 Players
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS ...................400 Voices
The "LEGENDE OF THE INVISIBLE CITY OF KITEJ" in English
(American premiere) .........................Rimsky-Korsakoff
The "CREATION" in commemoration of the Bicentennial anniversary of
its composer........................................Haydn
"CHORAL FANTASIA" (American premiere) conducted by its
composer ...................................... Gustav Holst
The "SYMPHONIC PSALMS". ......... . . .............Strawinsky
CD1FCTAT. CPTTFCTTCNS FOR CIT nRNT

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