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March 27, 1932 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-27

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r THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,

41 .keep men in a state of poverty or near noverty, but
also breed vice and crime which prevents the younger
generation from having any inspiration at all fort
Published every morning except Monday during the University further education.
)Pearby the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association. Setting aside prejudices and fears, I think ones
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re- could safely say that the new Russian school system,
publication of all news dispatehies credited to it or ,not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local neWs published herein. ranks a good deal above those in other countries in
.intered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second that it gives every individual the right and oppor-
class matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant tunity towards a higher education. That is to say,
Pstmaster General, the economic factor, which keeps so many of the
Subscritinn by carrier, $4.00; by lniil, $4.50 young men and women of our society from the ranks
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, of the intellectual, is completely eliminated. We in
Michigan ibPhones: Editorial, 4925; Business. 21214. this country seem to enjoy making long-winded
EDITORIAL STAFF orations about how great and far reaching our edu-
Telcphone 4925 cational system is, but, as the Lynd's so cloarly
MANAGING EDITOR pointed out in their study of a typical middle-west-
RICHARD L. TOBIN . ern town, there are many who even in the times of
News Editor................... ............... David M. Nichol;
City Editor .................. ............Carl Forsythe prosperity are compelled to remain in ignorance.
Editorial Director............................ Beach Conger, Jr. Russia's School) are built for the workers-for the
Sports Editor.............................. Sheldon C. Fullerton people; our schools arE' built for those who are for-
Women's Editor..........,<................Margaret M. Thompson tunate enough to have sufficient income.
Assistant News Editor .......................... Robert L. Pierce,

If you write, we have it.
Correspondence Stationery,
Fountein Pens, Ink, etc.
rpegriters all nakes.
Greeting Cards for evebodr.
O. D* tO RR IL
314 S. State St., Ann Arbors

b r

HIGH GRADE REPAIR SERVICE
Dianonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry

[T

Frank B. Gilbreth
Roland A.
rarlo
Brian W. Jones

NIGHT EDITORS
J. Cullen Kennedy James Inglis
Goodman Jerry E. Rosenthal
(eGorge A. St;ua er

Stanley W. Arnheim
Donald F. Ilankertz
Edward C. Campbell
Thomas Connenlan
Robert S. Deutsch
Albcrt L. Friedman

Sports Assistants
Joln W. Thomas
REPORTERS
Fred A. Ilulber
1 i old F. Klate
31 Y. Ml arsiaall
Roland Martin
II iir3y l cyer
Albert 11,.Newman
E. Terome Pettit
Prudence Foster
Alice (Cilhe--t
France s l Mchester
l;lizalhetlhMann
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

Charles A. Sanford
John W. Pritchard
Joseph Nxiihan
C. Hart ,chaai
Itrackley Shaw
P'arker Szydrr
Glenn R. Ninters
Margaret ()'Bern
Beverly Stark
Josephine oodlamns

- In attempting to criticize Russian propaganda--or*
ccucatLion, for certain well informed men have stated
that the difference between propaganda and educa-
tion is difficult to measure,.I wonder if the writer has
not modeled somewhat of a Jabberwocky himself. In
Russia, propaganda is used by the government to
further the ideal of a communist society; in this
country, therefore, it would seem that attempts at
flaying Russia and furthering the principles of Aier-
Icanism might. also make up one of Lewis Carrol's
strange monsters-perhaps a Jubjub bird. But when
one listens to the radio or reads a newspaper and
constantly hears the ballyhoo of "rugged individual-
ism," and of "a return to first principles," expounded
by men rolling in wealth and surrounded by millions
of starving people, one cannot help recalling the pic-
ture of the Walrus and the Carpenter sitting stuffed

ERITER$ - VORTABLE
New, Sepont1- -d . ReiiHt,
Snitlh-Corona, Noiseless,
Underwood, ,loyal, Rsington.
Soon- StArbor.
DANCING
atq
SANDWICH SHOP
(Next to the Michigan Theatre)
Watch for
Further Announcements
In the Daily
L'

.,,nr,4r.,naaa'nnawrn,,~,mrw,4ssanine *

wnwsr,,wmrw*fl.a~e.0 t' 'Wfl '~J'Wm

? a a a . ryas sr z --= l.n

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THESE MERCHANTS ARE WORTHY OF
YOUR PATONAGE

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Miriam Carver
Beatrice Collins
Louise Crandall
Elsie Feldnman

CHARLES T. KLINE....................... Business Managei
NORRIS P. JOHNSON....................Assistant Manager;
Department Managers
Advertising. .............................. Vernon Bishop
Advertisig Contracts........ ...............harry R. Iletiey
Advertising Secrvice............................ lvrmn C. VedderI
Publications.................................William 'T. Browli
Accounts ............ Ricbar Stratc'i
Women's business Manaiger...................... Ann 1V. Vernor

by a pile of shells.
"'0 Oysters' said the carpenter,
'You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer there came fione--
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one." K. B. W.
Booming Ind'ependent Politics

Orvil Aronson
Gilbcrt E. Burslcy
Allen Clark
Robert Finn
Ponia Becker
Alaxine Fisci rund
Ann Gallumeyer
Katherine ack:son
Dorothy J~aylin

Assistants
Arthur F. Kohn
(irnard Schnacke
Gratton W. Sharp
irglisi a Al f ' nib
('arn \hibm11 sher
1 . ]cii Seb:' iie
May SuEfrirdC

I)onald A. Johnson, II
1dean 'furner
Don Lyon
Bernard I. Good
7lelen Spxncr
lKatthryni Spencer
Kzathryn Stork
(>areie lWats
ipxy 'Ii ,almtlm \Watts

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NIGHT EDITOR-JAMES H. INGLIS
SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 1932
TaSales 'xParty
Lines, and the Budget
T HE sales tax issue in the House of Represent-
atives appears to have split that group into
two more factions,' insurgents and regulars, irre-
spective of party lines. Now that the original bill
has been cut so that the estimated revenue will
yield about 527 million dollars instead of the ori-
ginal 1.246 million, the regular Hoover-Garner

To The Editor:
Next week's student council election offers inter-
esting possibilities. It may mark a turning point in
student affairs. These possibilities center about the
outcome of the protest now being heard from the
generally passive independent students. The Inde-
pendent Rebellion has gone so far that an effort is
being made to present a complete ticket of three
Literary school aophomores ror election to the Stu-
dent Council.
The trend of student politics in the past has been
marked by the complete failure of the independents
to secure representation in the student government.
They truthfully say that, due to lack of organization
among the non-fraternity students, there has been.
in. recent times, no real attempt to secure representa-
tion for the independents in campus affairs.
A growing feeling that there was a gross misman-
agment of student interests by the fraternity parties
which have secured control of the campus was cryr-
tallized by last week's election fraud. Coupled wit>

MUSICAL
EVENTS
All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given
without admission charge.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Violin-
cellist, in Sonata Recital, March
27, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
March 31, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violincellist, April 3,
4:15.
HELEN VAN LOON, Pianist,
April 19, 4:15, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
April 21, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
NELL B. STOCKWELL, Pianist,
April 24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MARJORIE MCCUNG, So.
prano, April 29, 4:15, Mendels-
so in Theatre.
VIfZGINIA HAMISTER, Pianist,
May 3, 4:15, Mc:-delsohn Thc-
atn .
PALMER CHiUSTIAN, in Organ
Recital, every Wednesday at
4:15 unlesa otherwise announced.
HELEN VAN LOON, Soprano,
May 12, 4:15N Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.

I

leadership seems to have been defeated, and the this is a growing appreciation of the fact that a large
House will be controlled by the insurgents. share of responsibility for conditions such as now
Although at least part of the bill has been'exist rest with those who are gripiig the most, the
passed, chances appear slight for its passage in apathetic independents. It seems evident that the
the Senate without further insurgent inangling non-fiaternity men have no right to level abuse at
and Congress will still have the problem of balanc- the present fraternity control of campus politics
ing the budget on its hands. The respective until they themselves have made an honest effort to
representatives appear to have forgotten that, do a better job. Entry into, or interest in student
having passed appropriation bills to spend money politics has too long been considered a futile waste
for the United States, they must now find means of time by the independents. Their attitude has been
for raising that money. That money will have to one of: "laissez faire' and kick at the results. They
come from the pockets of their constituents, and, have hardly earned the right to criticize.
Next week's election will provide a test to deter-
for the sake of re-election, the drain on those,
pocketbooks must be as light as possible. mine whether the independents are sufficiently
The members should put aside their own sincere in their criticism of fraternity-dominated
personal ambitions and think of the United States campus politics to make an honest effort to change
as a whole for a change. This condition, however, the situation. The fate of the three independent
it must be admitted is too idealistic to expect from candidates will indicate whether the non-fraternity
a group of politicians. Only in case of war has it men are too lazy and irresponsible to air their griev-
been the custom to legislate with wisdom for the ances at the voting booths, or whether a real desire
entire country instead of with an eye to the next for representation will materialize in support at the
elections. Undoubtedly, whether or not the sales polls for truly mdependent candidates. A Header.
tax, as it cam e out of the W ays and M eans com ---- - - -- - - - - - - - - - ---.__ __._ _
mittee, was a good thing or a bad thing, the fact
remains that Congress still has the budget before SCREEN E
it, and one may hope that other sources of revenue
will he found by the legislature. Both Republic-
ans and Democrats have their eyes on the Presi- AT THE MAJEESTIC
dential elections this year. The latter hoped, with "The Hatchet Man" u
control of the House, to prove their case for an-
other four years of control. The Republicans Edward G. Robinson comes through as thc
hoped to profit by their opponent's mistakes. For Hatchet Man, a very difficult role, to prove his ability
this reason, it is very probable that regular party as an actor. In a film packed with suspense, fairly
lines wil be resumed once more. reeking with fascinating and weird effects, he carries

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.;
f;

CANPUS OPINION
sp i "I"m "oll ""t ld beco"strued as
exjmressmi g the imim iorhi mmc m mm i IOf I he ),tile. Anonymolls coim-
nn i'at ions wl .A : uh ICJ e iir1aileCd. The na uics of colmini ca l ts
will, ho ver, at o re u est. Contrib-
utor.s arecski to bec bief,colin thenlselves to less thanl 30e
words jf uossib e.
K. B. W. Disagrees With the Crane College Javelin

The Editor:

' In regard to the editorial reprinted in the Daily
ar Saturday, entitled "Jabberwocky," it seems that{
ome comment is necessary. It is the easiest thingj
o paint Russian propaganda in the shape of a gro-
esque monster, if the writer is attempting to be
musing. However, if he tries to down Russia by
riticism of certain articles in a Soviet daily, he is
ghting on thin ground.
The article quoted from the Moscow News, pointed
ut the fact that American worker's children being
ppressed and undernourished, are unable to partake
f the full advantages which education could give
hem. Such statements cannot be doubted by those
'ho have studied the present conditions. It has
Yuen e:>timatped recentlv that neivlv twenty million

away all honors.
Loretta Young, as the Hatchet Man's wife, carries
a unique make-up admirablyand uses her artificial
almond eyes to excellent advantage.
For the plot, nothing more need be said than thatr
it concerns San Francisco's Tong wars. They, in fact
and fiction, have always been a source of mysterious
thrills. In this instance, they require the murder of
a best friend by the Hatchet Man, at the begiining
of the picture, and subsequent gruesome hatchetj
work thereafter.
In the shift of background from tht 'Frisco of 15
years ago to the 'Frisco of today, the opportunity for
Americanizing the flowery Chinese language appears,
and the directors have taken advantage of it, as
well as the opportunity to modernize the clothes and,
business of the Hatchet Man. It provides some inter-
esting shots.
The pictujre is well arrayed with Oriental costum-
ing and also supplied with the incidental music to
be expected, with a shot of jazz here and there, un-i
expected. Probably the best shot comes at the top-
notch conclusion, when a hatchet thrown at the eye
of an image breaks through the wall to crush the
villain's skull-the vengeance of the great god
Buddha.
Not much can be said for the short subjects
accompanying the Chinese feature. Even the news
reel is linking' in interest Tnonmuch Dunnino n the

4 Days-May 18, 19, 20, 21, '32--6 Concerts
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEM ENT
Earl V. Moore .... Musical Director
Frederick Stock . . Orchestra Conductor
Gustav Holst ..... Guest Conductor
Eric DeLamarter. ................ Assistant Conductor
Juva Higbee .................... Children's Conductor
GOETA LJUNGBERG (Yota Yungbairg) Soprano
"A daughter of the Gods." Sensational Metropolitan Opera Company
Swedish Prima Dona
JULIETTE LIPPE ......................Soprano
Distinguished star of Covent Garden and other opera companies
RUTH RODGERS ...................... Soprano
Well known concert and oratorio singer
MINA HAGER ..... ..................Contralto
Distinguished Oratorio Singer
BENIAMINO GIGLI........ ..............Tenor
A Leading tenor Metropolitan Opera Company
FREDERICK JAGEL.....................Tenor
Another leading Metropolitan Opera Company tenor
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS............. Baritone
America's outstanding concert and opera baritone
NELSON EDDY ........ ................ Baritone
Another outstanding opera and concert singer
CHASE BAROMEO ....................... Bass
Leading Bass Chicago Civic Opera Company
GITT A GRADOVA ................... . . Pianist
One of America's greatest piano virtuosi
PALMER CHRISTIAN .................Organist
Another fine American artist
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION.. . 300 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. .. . 70 Players
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS ............. . . 400 Voices
The "LEGENDE OF THE INVISIBLE CITY OF KITEJ" in English
(American premiere).... . . . . . Rimsky-Korsakoff
The "CREATION" in commemoration of the Bicentennial anniversary of
its composer .............. . ......... . H aydn
"CHORAL FANTASIA" (American premiere) conducted by its

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Phone 4213
For Call and
Delivery Service
CM"rLea MND
.awg . E A N E
,clean as a breath iaf Jprin
214 S. State St.
7 17 ,C T .:> .:

"Cash
and
Carryv

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Ell

Ill

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