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March 18, 1932 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-18

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T THE MICHIGAN DAILY SAY, MARCH 18,1

ished every morning except Monday during the University
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
ber of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
zn of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published herein.
red at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
tter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
er General.
,ription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50
es: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
-- ~EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICH4ARD L. TOBIN'
itor ...................................David M. Nichol
:or ......................................Carl Forsythe
Director .............................Beach Conger, Jr.
ditor ..............................Sheldon C. Fullerton
Editor .......o..............Margaret M. Thompson
News Edritor .......................... Robert L. Pierce

make the difference, while the smaller points may
also settle the fate of a movie. This is the case in
"Two Kinds of Women."
The plot is mediocre but excellent direction and
clever handling of minor situations lift the picture
to a place worthy of note. The story which we have
viewed before in other forms, deals with the daugh-
ter of a strict Western legislator, who goes New
Yorker in a big way.
Complications, the base of all photodramas, spring
up, and the fair young lady, well played by the up-
and-coming Miriam Hopkins, sees her fill of night
life, including a late police court, runs into the un-
evitable parental wrath, and finally finds a promise
of happiness in the arms of a blase young Manhatter.
Miss Hopkins continues her bid for stardom but
Phillips Holmes is quite wooden opposite her, as
seems to be Mr. Holmes' wont. Irving Pichel is some-
what miscast as the senator from the wide-open
space of one of the Dakotas, with the oft-met and
revered wide brimmed black hat and string tie.
But the essence of the acting lies in the minors.
Robert Emmett O'Connor handles himself well in a
small but meaty role as a power in Metropolitan poli-
tics, who befriends the young lovers. Stanley Fields,
in his most benevolent role, gains many laughs as
the crude but likeable bootlegger and Josephine
Dunn, once a candidate for far-flung fame, reappears
on the screen all too briefly as his perennially inebri-
ated wife.
- I

If You.write* we ha've it. _
Correspondence Sta~tioney
Foul twin Peru,, Ink, etc.
Ty'pewriters al rakes.
Greet. xg Cards f or evevbody
VO ; 0R I L

Gilhreth
oIlawil A.
" arl

NIGHT EDITORS
J. Cullen Kennedy James
Goodman Jerry E. Rosenthal
S.'illcvt 00 ^-rgA. Staulcr

Inglis

wV. Ifnes

v W. Arnheim
lF. Blankertz
1 C. Campbell
s Connellan
S. Deutsch
I . Friedlman

Sports Assistants
John VW. Thomas
REPORTERS
Fred A. Buber
Ikarold F. KI te
Iohn S. Marshall
Rolanl Martin
1 iiry Meyer
Albert 71. Newman
:I'. Jeromie Pettit
Prudence Foster
Alice Gilbe-t
Frances Manchester
Elizabeth Mann

C'harles A. Sanford
jIohin XW.Pritchiard
joseph Ribiari
Brtackly Sliaw
P'arker gny,+.r
t leou R. WXX ters
Margaret 0O'irn
Beverly St ark
\tn WaaXadsu-orth
Josephine Xoodiams

BROWN-CRESS
a e~n,,.n teg.
INVESTMENT
SECURTISITIESn M x
Orders .xecvtd On oR .x-
do&ng Accwnts corRld
ea s eservotiv morgin
PWkphone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
lot FLOOR
APPLICATION
PHOTOS
Special Reduced
Prices
$2.00 doz,-2 Proofs
Guaranteed Work at Prices you
can afford to pay.
WHITES STUDIO
110 E. Huron Street
Copies samne price. Phone 3355

I EIDIITGIAL COMMEN1T

n Carver
ice Collins
Crandail
Feldman

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
2LES T. KLINE ...................... Business Managei
RIS P. JOHNSON..................... Assistant Manager
Department Managers
tiling....... ..................... Vernon Bishop
tiling Contracts .......................... harry R. Begley
ising Service.........................Byron C. Veddei
ations......................... William TI. Brown
its .................................Richard Stratemeii
n'S Business Manager ...................... Ann W. Verno,

Aronson
t~ ?. Bursicy
Clark
tl Firnn
a Becker
11e Fisch1grnnd
Gallineury
'rifle Jackson
hy L.ayln

Assistants
Arthur F. Kohn
Bernard Sclmacke
(haftot XW. Sharp
Virgin1ia M c('omlh
Caroline Mosher
HeTle n Olson
I! eltn Sch ude
Alay Seefried

Donald A. Johnson, 11
D an TPurner
Don Lyon
Jhrnard .i1. Good
lKthryn Stender
'lre nS
ary lileI h \N'atts

NIGHT EDITOR-JAMES INGLIS
FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1932-
ermany's Stock Rises
(ith the Election Results
(ITH attention focussed on the Presidential
elections in Germany because of the precar-
financial situation of that country, the results,
ough not final, were pleasing to most foreign
ntries who see in Hindenburg's rule a maxi-
m of stability in economic and political matters.
Hitler, although he fell far short of obtaining'
number of votes his supporters believed he
.d poll, gained several million over the amount
oiled in the last German elections in 1930. In
respect, he has made progress. But he prob-
will not be able to gain as many again before
t month, and thus Hindenburg's election ap-
s to be certain. Not even a coalition of the
osition could prevent this, since it would entail
pion of all parties to obtain a small plurality,
it would be impossible to join the Communist
erents to either the Nazis or the Nationalists.
Hitler, by advocating a dictatorship on the
eist line, appeals to many patriotic voters whc
live in dreams of former days. His political
nises, however, have been vague and general
cannot continue to bring more adherents into
camp. His demand for cancellation of the
sailles treaty naturally brings support from
e who feel strongly the stigma of the war guilt
se. But Hitler so far has neglected to state
vhat manner he would carry out this policy,
. a hostile France awaiting any further trouble
7 its neighbor.
)n the whole, the defeat of Hitler and the largc
ality Hindenburg obtained has strengthened
:onfidence of the creditor nations in Germany.
laps it will now be possible to proceed with the
poned Locarno conference. Perhaps the pow-
nay feel that it is not necessary. Between now
April 10 they see no hope for Hitler's success,
:h event would imperil their holdings in Ger-
y, and now that doubt has been removed, even
ice can adopt a more conciliatory attitude.

THE U. S. A. IS A NIFTY
(Columbia Spectator)
We have been accused of having truck with Soviet
Russia. Some say that we are Soso Stalin's secret
agent and that, if we ever had the opportunity, we
would break a leg curtseying before Vladimir Ilyitch
Lenin's mausoleum on the south side of the Red
Square.
What fantastic accusations to level at us! No
man in his right senses could question our American-
ism. For generations upon generations our family
has sweated and labored to construct the magnificent
edifice of the United States on what was, in the
eighteenth century, a revolutionary commune. Our
great-grandfather died in the Revolutionary War.
We, ourself, will become a member of the Society of
the Sons of the American Revolution when we be-
come of age. And they call us a Red!
Only the other day a young man called us over
the telephone from the headquarters of the Hoovers
Loyalty League. He wanted us to enroll in his organ-
ization the members of which, he told us, are pledged
to make the welkin ring by writing letters to all the
newspapers. And what did we answer the Hoovext
Loyalty League? This is what we answered: "The
campaign to flood the nation with laudatory com-
ments on Dr. Hoover thrills and dazzles us. Count
us in.'
Readers, this is a great country, and it grows
greater by the minute. Where else can you have sc
much fun for so little money? In what other coun-
try could you read the record of the highest legisla-
tive body and laugh yourself into stitches? There i.,
something inherently grand about this country. Th(
U. S. A. is a nifty.
"TAMING OF IIE SHREW," presented by Play
Production in the Laboratory Theatre.

NEW LIGHTS FOR THEOLDS

A Review

9 REF1LECTllONS

I

By Margaret R. O'Brien
Easily this season's most significant student effort
that of Play Production's "Taming of the Shrew'
setting a highwater mark for smoothness of tempt
and general dramatic finesse, was enthusiastically
acclaimed last night by a large audience. A more!
fortunate choice of fare could hardly have be
made, for if Play Production feels that it must give
Shakespeare, it can never go wrong on his high
comedies.
Honors of the evening definitely went to Mr.
Handley, whose lordly Petruchio left nothing to be
desired. Mr. Handley has cultivated the fine art of
swaggering to the nth degree, and dominates the
action most of the time. Miss Todd's Katherina was
secondary only in that the role itself did not give her
as much of an opportunity to show her talent. She
played it for all it was worth; she screamed, she
stormed, she pulled hair in the approved shrewish
manner, but after all her valiant efforts to assert
herself, there was Mr. Handley busy dominating her.
While the general excellence of the production
was due as much to the individual contributions of
the other players, the play had a slight tendency to
lag when Miss Todd and Mr. Handley were not on,
the stage. When either one of them appeared, their
presence seemed to crystallize the action and give,
it force and meaning.
Especially enjoyable were the scenes of Mr. Hand-
ley's tempestuous wooing, and the highlights of the
evening were the slapstick furniture tossing episode,
and the delightful moment in scene five when Mr.
Handley tossed the protesting but flexible Miss Todd
over his shoulder.
Other excellent performances were contributed
by Mr. John Doll, Mr. Milliken, Mr. Pribil, Miss Scott.
and Miss Johnson. Mr. Doll did wonders with al
mediocre role, seeming to catch the essential spirit1
of the lines more than most of the other characters.
Mr. Milliken made a preposterous comic character
exceedingly funny, every gesture and inflection being
entirely in character with his amazing makeup.
Miss Scott made a demure Bianca, and lent the
character charm and dignity, even making a com-
mendable showing in her scenes with Miss Todd,
which is something of a feat. Miss Johnson impressed
in a brief but spirited characterization, and displayedi
undeniable pugilistic form in her embattled encoun-
ter with Miss Todd.
Mr. Benstock disappointed in his interpretation of
the egregious Gremio, for while his first appearance I

SHE'S
ON A BUDGET
and she's a
HOLE PROOF
HOSIERY
FAN
Sheers and Semi-Sheers
{From 89c up
Mesh and Lace Hose
$1.50 and $1.95
THE CAMPUS
SHOP
229 South State at Liberty
Melody
in
1R 00
Like tones in music, there are
tones in food. Dinner at Dear-
born Inn is a symphony of
flavor and good taste. It is
prepared under the masterly di-
rection of a real New England
chef. Harmony is also apparent
in the Early American furnish-
ings and the old-fashioned hos..
pitality. Table d'hote dinners in
the Early American Dining
Room. A la carte service in the
English Coffee Shop. Unusual
facilities for faculty dinners and
teas. 'Phone Dearborn 1810 for
reservations.
Ample parking space and
garage.
DEARBORN
INN
Opposite the Ford Airport
Oakwood Boulevard Dearborn
Michigan
MUSICAL e
EVENTS
All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given
without admission charge.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Violin-
cellist, in Sonata Recital, March
27, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
March 31, 4:15, Mendessohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat
tern, Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violincellist, April 3,
4:15.
HELEN VAN LOON, Pianist,
April 19, 4:15, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
April 21, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
NELL B.2STOCKWELL, Pianist,
April 24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.

f!
I

GENRA,'sEETI

structures and cherished memorials were lost
in the dark.
It has fallen to college graduates- lighting
engineers and specialists in the General Elec-
tric organization-to design equipment ideally
suited for the permanent illumination of cam-
pus buildings--Floodlights that give distinction
by night to library or fraternity house or class
gift.

in preparation for professional or commercial
achievement either with this company or with
one of the many public utilities. In this de-
partment, a first-hand knowledge is gafned of
generation and distribution equipment and of
the electric machinery used in modernizing
industry and transportation. And here the
young engineer "finds himself" amid the op-
portunities for success that abound in the great
electrical industry.
95.894

G RADUATES of recent years remember Many of these engineers have rouned o
the veil of obscurity that settled over the campus their technical equipment in the Test- Depart-
at night-relieved only by a lighted window ment of General Electric, where the actual
here and there and a few yard lamps. Notable handling of electric apparatus is the last step

AT THE MICHIGAN I
"Strangers in Love"
spite the mysterious title, "Strangers in Love"
I worth seeing if you have patience enough to
rough two of the foulest comedies ever pro-
Fredric March is both parts of a twin organ-
a and does a neat job of being two places at
ame time. The plot: Nasty old Arthur Drake
ric March), cheats his brother Buddy (Fredric
a), and a lot of other people, including an old
1 of the family. The poor defrauded twin who
athlete, a member of the Lafayette Escadrille
tramp, in fact just an all-around gooder, comes
to get a dime for a cup of coffee, and during
Lterview Arthur conveniently dies from a heart
. Then Buddy, the good guy, impersonates his
rother, and things get pretty interesting, and
the help of good old Snowball, the family re-
', and a lot of luck he gets all messed up in a
with gangsters, forgers, liars, cheaters and
eologists. The picture falls down terribly in the
eel or so but apparently there wasn't any other
ut of the situation, though that doesn't excuse
.irector for putting in that fearfully thrilling

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