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March 12, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

.c U
e University

vvesern onerence Ednorial Association
I Press'is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
>e and the local news published herein.
Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ial rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
y carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50
%rbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Editorial, 4925; Business. 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
~Te~lten4925
MANAGI G EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBINW
- --....-Carl Forsythe
........... ...Beach Conger, Jr:
..David M. Nichol
...Sheldon C. Fullerton
.M.......r... argaret NJ. Thompson
itor.................. .. Robert L. Pierce

NIGHT EDITORS
reth J. Culleni Kennedy JamTies
A. Goodman Jerry E. Rosenthal
Iar Seiffert George A. Stauter'
Sports Assistants

InglisI

'om}as
ian Jones Charles
REPORTERS
rnheim Fbred A. Huller
lankertz Harold F. KIute
ampbel1 Norman Kraft
ellan Edward RV. Marshall
ntsch Roland Martin
jedman Alhnrt 11. Newman t
'den lF. Jerome Pettit
r Prdesr'.- Foster
na Ahe &i1kt
ill Fracei linclhester
a ljizabeth 4Mann

John S. Townsend
A. Sanford
Jeln X. Pritchard
oseiph Revihan
C. Hart 5chaaf
Bhackh y Shaw
Parker Snyder
~Rort S. Ward
C., k. Winners
Margaret 0' IDri-n
leverly Stark
Elma Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhams

that is not all to be said, and it is my personal opin-
ion that it is not the crux of the problem.
The above statement is made from-a background
of 12 years of close association and identification
with the financial affairs of the Sigmi Phi Epsilon
fraternity, one of the fraternity organizations on
the Michigan campus.
It is my contention the deferred rushing plan
has made for, and from year to year will continue
to make for, substantial loss of revenues among
frat'ernities; a loss practically, irrecoverable; a loss
running into several thousands of dollars per year
to practically all fraternities in Ann Arbor.1
The foregoing contention is based on a schedule
of figures set forth below, and the schedule is, I
believ, representative of the procedure, charges,
costs, etc., of Ann Arbor fraternities. In the broad
the scheduile ispremised on the actual fact that no
revenue can b:e derived from any freshman until]
About April 1st. That fact alone is far from the
facts under prior plans of pledging and housing and;
boarding freshmen.
The loss of revenues, and right at this point the
shoe pinches, can be summarized in a representative
schedule as follows:
Under the former plan, it is to be remembered,:
freshmen were pledged as early as the first weekj
of the academic year and pledging was continued
until the pledge roll was completed, and. at the
date of pledging, as early as the beginning of
the academic year, freshmen were urged, and in!
about 95 per cent of the cases, freshmen ate at
the fraternity house, and accordingly paid board,j
and in some cases room charges-and all longI
before April 1st of the freshman year.
The loss of revenue schedule follows:!
3 men pledged 1 week before October
Ist of the year: $
September-s board weeks @ $10.00
per week 30.00
From October 1 through the fol-
lowing Morch-3 nen 22 board
weeks @ 10.00 per week 660.00
4 men pledged about 1 week after Oct.
1st:
October--4 men x 3 board weeks (
$10.00 per week 120.00
From November 1st through the
month ofMarch:
4 men x 18 board weeks at
$10.00 per week 720.00
5 more men pledged about November.
1st:
'rom November 1st through the
month of March:
5 men x 18 board weeks at $10.00
per week 900,00
3 men pledged about January 1st:
From January 1st through the
month of March:
3 men x 12 board weeks at $10.00
per week 360.00
Add: Probable room rent from
pledges not under private room
contract: 210.00

Music Drama
"ROBIN HOOD"
A Review By
Richard L. Tobin,
Among the literature of fine light
opera, Reginald de Koven's vital,
penetrating "Robin Hood" still
stands out as one of the few rea-
sons why American contributions
to music must be reckoned with.
Mimes tried a revival of its de-
lightful music and its good libret-
to at Hill Auditorium last night;
and there wasn't a dull moment. It
is indeed invigorating to be able to
say frankly and openly that a
campus production is a hit, for last
night's was-distinctly.
Famed for "Brown October Ale"
and "Oh Promise Me," the opera is
more than just a revival of two
outstanding hits o f yesteryear.
From the opening chorus to the
finale, the whole things moves at a
terrific pace which even the un-
wieldy Hill Auditorium stage can-
not lessen. Mimes' new show has
life-in its music and in its chor-

I

SU ND A Y
D IN NER
Served 11 A. M.
to 8 P. M.
All You Can Eat
60C

Gallery ChQrale Choir

PULLEN
CAFETERIA
Dancing
6-7:30 every njght
Sunday 1-2:30

300 Singers from Michigan High Schools
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
The Bach St. Matthew Passion
PEASE AUDITORIUM YPSILANTI

1 1,

March 18, 8 P. M. exactly
Tickets 50c at doer

No Reserved Seats

st

lI

r

h

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DAILY

.

i.

Ypsilanti Normal Choir
200 SINGERS

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
KLINE ......................IBusiness Manager
roJfNSOr ...............Assistant Mannel
Department Managers
.... .. .... ... .... ... .... Vernon Bishol
rtracts ...... .. .... harry R. ltcgley
rvice. lron C. Ve~dei
~........Will1iam T. Brown
...... Richard Stratemeii
iess Manager.....................Ann W. vernor

Assistants
a John Keyser
irslky Arthur 1. Kuhn
James TLowe
P Amylll Harsha
Cigsel atherine Jdckson
ld Dorothy Layin
lrund Virginia McComb
earoslin Mosher
an Hlelen Olsen

Grafton NV. Sharp
I "mald A. Johnson, 11
li nLyon
Be'na rd . Good
ly Seefried
]Minie Selig
liflt edn jenceer
:Kathryn Stork
Celaretaner
4ary 1lizatl Watts

NIGHT EDITOR-GEORGE A. STAUTER
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1932
ordination of Law'
:orcing Facilties
IME, like business, is apparently cyclical in
its movements. It has alternate periods of
i and depression, as it were, however irregu-
hey may be. Kidnapping, it seems, is the lat-
-rward movement of organized crime, for in
ast few years there has been a wave of bodily
ing that has reached alarming proportions.
some time the force of this movement was not
noticeable. It took, naturally enough, a case
as the kidnapping of Charles Augustus Lind-
h; Jr., to focus local, state, and federal atten-
on this latest phase of crime.
idnapping, as a racket, so-called, is new to
nology. But the efforts of kidnappers are
without fruition, for the payments of ransom
uge and the police, in most instances, will ad-.
the payment of these in order to frustrate
y harm. We, have heard much about the kid-
ings of adults. Lately, however, the "rack-
as looked to other channels and has chosen.
ren as its victims, since both police and par-
will proceed in regaining the child with cau-
in order to secure its safety.
he crime of kidnapping should not be left en-
alone to. the states. It demands also the at-
)n of the federal government. State laws are,
qual, but federal laws governing this crime
xact a punishment effective in one state as
as another. Large cities. are hiding places of
:tors, who can safely screern themselves from.
piblic view and consumrnate their dealings
gh forces of the underworld. Coordination
lice authority is needed and the federal gov-
ent can readily supply this lack. Once its
r is felt, kidnapping will capitulate to where
not profitable-and in the end be practically

3,000.00

Loss of revenue

The above schedule allows for the vacation holi-
days at Christmas. It includes a pledge Roll of 15
men, not the largest pledge roll in any event.
There are, of course, some additional operating
costs concerned with this additional revenue gleaned
from past pledging systems. Food costs are in-
creased, but not nearly in proportion to increased
revenues. On the other hand, taxes, insurance, con-
tract or mortgage payments, labor and other service
costs, and practically all other expenses are the
same for a 35 nan chapter as for a 20 man chap-
ter.
So-the bulk of the $3,000.00 of revenue is gone,
and it is practically irrecoverable from any other
source. And-under the deferred rushing plan, it
,will continue to be absent from the revenue end of
the budget computations.
The foregoing is the dollars angle to the deferred
rushing plan of pledging. If the University wishes
or plans to strike at the fraternities through the1
door of finances, it has and can continue to cripplei
them to the tulne of from $2,000.00 to $4,000.00 each
per year as against the system in use prior to the
deferred rushing system. If the University 4wishes
to cut down the number of fraternities, the deferred
rushing plan will be a great aid. Only the ones
that are strongly entrenched in a financial way, with
pres.tige and age behind them, will r'emain. The
others can only pull in their sails, or haul them
down completely.
If. there are tangible, worthwhile and definite
results to be accomplished under the deferred rush-
ing plan, and I am not here stating or contending
there are no*, the said accomplishments, benefits,
etc., should be set out in a clear, cleancut, concrete
and accurate presentation of facts.
The trial is costing -the fraternities in Ann Arbor
about $150,000.00 per academic year.
Respectfully,
E. T. Pheney, '21.

uses particularly. A light opera has
to have to be a hit.
Before I forget it, let it. be said
that rarely has a symphony orches-
tra accompanied the Metropolitan
with greater gusto and real pro-
fessionalism than last night. Mr.'
David Mattern is to be commended.
And you should see Hill Auditor-
ium! It's been turned onto Sher-
wood forest so effectively by Mr.
Francis Palms and Mr. Orrin Park-
er that the entire cast seems to
catch the atmosphere. And when
a chorus performs like this chorus
performs, it doesn't matter what
else goes on, or how many men it
takes to pull the thirty foot cur-
tain across that vacuous stage.
Easily the hit of the show are
these exhilirating choruses and the
Mr. If. C. Howard's expertness as
Sheriff of Nottingham; yet, I sup.,
pose, one would become familiar
with such a part if one hd had
the amount of professional re-
hearsal Mr. Howard has. And one
would probably put in an extra pun
or two, as Mr. Howard does. Miss
Dorethea Torbeson's "Forest Song"
in Act II so astonished the audi-
ence that she could have had any
number of encores had she so de-
sired. Two difficult, Lily-Ponsian
cadenzas are so carefully and deli-
cately executed you'd never guess
they came from a school girl.
The best song in the whole show
is not "Oh Promise Me" or "Brown
October Ale," but the Cavalier
Chorus in the first act which has, I
think, more real swing to it, and
more of a melody than anything
American except, perhaps, the
shop-worn "Drinking Song" from
r the Studeit Prince. The animation
of the chorus, especially the little
inilkmaid second from 4he right in
the "Sheriff's Song," and the bril-
liant selection in costumes drives
the show along at an exciting rate.
Individually, George D. Brown's
1 "Robin Hood" (he has a voice and
looks), William E. Greiner's "Friar
Tuck," and the singing of 'Helen
VanLoon, particularly her solo in
Act II ("When a Maiden Weds")
are the aces in the deck that fit it
so nicely behind professional Mr.
Howard. Miss VanLoon's distinct
advantage over all the rest of the
singers is that you can understand
absolutely every word she says, and
she seems to be entirely at her eas,
In this latter vein Frances John-
son's "Dame Durden" is a master-
piece.
There are so many. high spots
I'd better enumerate them:
SETTNG: The green costumes
of the outlaws; the elegant jail in
Act III; the electrified (that's liow
it's done) anvil accompanying Will
Scarlet's "Armorer's Song" (Act
III); and the springy, green-turfed
rock in center stage (Act II).
MUSIC: "Come the Bowmen"-
n Act I chorus of unusual merit;
the Cavalier song; "Jet Black
Crow" in Act II; and, I suppose "Oh
Promise Me" and "Brown October
Ale," just because-
0RCWSTRA: Everybody.
CUORUS Everybody.
LYRICS: The line in Act II-
"Egad, I seem to have won the
fancy of this buxom dame"; and
the Sheriff's rime in the first act-
"Nro Earl you are in ooth,

our PreInventry Sale
PHENOMENAL VALUES FOR LAST MINUTE
SHOPPERS.
YOUR LAST OPPORTUNITY' TO TAKE ADVAN-
TAGE OF AMAZING REDUCTIONS.

TWO

am T

bookstnr ~8

_,y,._

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
Ministers
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"REDEMPTIVE SERVICE."
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"THE DIVINE HUMILIATION."
Selections from "The Crucifixion" by
John Stainer will be sung by
Arthur Hackett and Hervey Lyon,
soloists and the choir. .
Both sermons by Dr. Fisher.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Cor. East University Ave. & Oakland
Rabbi Bernard Huller, Director
Philip Bernstcin, Assistant to the
Director
Sunday Morning, March i
11:15 A, M.-Services in the Chapel
of the Women's I eagtie Bluildi '
Judge Rubiner of the- Commcnr
Plea Court of" Detroit will speak
on I"The Clalleng e to the Jew,"
;:00 P. M-S de1 t lIrm. David
W. Leach and Morris Glasier will
discuss "The Question of Inter-
marriage."
Conservaive ervics each 1ri.y
evcung, 7:30 P. M., at the Foun-
dation.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH I

THE
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets
WESLEY HALL
E. W. Blakenan, Director
Sunday, March 13, 1932
12 M.-Mr. Pryor and Dr. Blakeman
will lead the regular classes at
this time.
6:00 P. M--The Rev. Fred Cowin
is speaking Ito the students upon
the subject of "The Growth of the
Spirit."
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sta.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Sunday, March 13, 1932
9:30 A. M.-Service in German.
9:30 A. M.- Bible School.
10:45 A. M. MWr>ing Worship.
Sermon topic: "J ctrin g Grace-
A Tragedy."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship and
Supper. Professor Kazarinoff will
speak on Russia.
Mid -week Lenten Service 7:30, .
Wednesday evening i the German
language.
ZION LUTHERN CHURCH
Washington Street and 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.--Bible School Lesson
topic: "The Things That Com-
f or t."
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship
with sermon: "The Living Inter-

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, Associate Minister
9i30 A. M..-Bible Study Class for
Freshmen students atthe Church
House, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Final Lap."
12:00 Noon-Discussion Group for
Upperclassmen in Ethical Issues in
Current Events.
5:30 P. M,-Social Hour for Young
People.'
6:30 P M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. "Negro Art and Education"
by Negro University Students.
Lyman Johnson, Chairman; Ad.
dress by George Crochett; musical
nubers by Evelyn Jones and
David Cannon.
THE
EIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayler, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:30 A. M.--The Church School.
Mr. Wallacc Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach on:
"THE CHALLENGE OF JESUS."

A CHALLENGE TO PROFESSOR CARR

Dear Professor Carr:

tors publihed iin thiscltumn soii(ldnot be cnstii ned ;;
aid the editorial 1opinion of 'T}heaily.1 nonymous emu'
tious will bh disregarded. The names of conmmicant
wever, be regarded as confidential upon request. 'outritt-
re asked to lbe brief, eonfiining thenaselves to less th:n ojr
;i IPUSsible.
Daily does not publish anonymous contri-
to this colunn. If the writer who signed
r T. B. will communicate with the editorial
his letter will be printed. On all communi-
the names of writers will be kept confiden-
o desired, --TheEditor,
fXPERT APIPRAISES FRATERNITIES
Editor.
tolowing is a copy. of a letter I. addressed to
.t Ruthven and which I believe would be of
to your readers:
Wd with more than passing interest your

In the statejnents attributed to you in this moiru-
ing's issue of The Michigan Daily there is raised a
fundamental question concerning Greek letter frat-
eruitics at Michigan and elsewhere. Your standing
as a sociologist gives peculiar weight to your ap-
parent opinions that fraternities are repressive "of
worthwhile intellectual achievement and originality
of thought," that they teach students "the ritual
of social behavior at the expense of academic
achievement;" and that training in the University
in manners and in "leadership" are mutually exclus-
ive.
These opinions, especially when fraternities are
compared with rooming houses and other groupsi
Mre contrary to my own experience and beliefs, and
if 'there is definite evidence that I am wrong I should
like to have it. Believing that this desire is shared
by many others who have read this interview, I am
taking the liberty of asking you three questions and
of requesting that, if you care to answer them, you
send a copy of your reply to The Daily for publi-
cation.
1. Are your views accurately expressed by The

12:00 M.-Students' Class at Guild
House, 503 . -Huron St. Mr:
Chapman.
5:30 P. M.--Student Friendship
Hour.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Albert 1. Logan
will speak on South America.
FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.

:

You vain, presumptuous youth."
CAST: Messrs. Howard, Brown,
Greiner, and M'mselles Johnson,
VanLoon, and Torbeson. And, of
course, the milkmaids and the out-
laws.
Primarily, however, the reason
why "Robin Hood" is such a. dis-

South Fourth Avenue

Theodore R. Schmale, Pastor
9:00 A. M. 'Bl<Ible Class.

10:30 A.
Service.
stance."

M.- Regular Morning
Sermon topic: "~Sub-

11:0 A.

fM.-M"Ting Worship.

11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow.

1f

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