100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1932 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE . MCIAN AIL

-PAEI

ANS FOR ANHAL WIAA CRNIVAL
INOUNCED BY JEAN BENTLEY,'33I
fI1NITE DAT9E IS NOT YET DECIDE

Occult Arts, Topic
Discussed by Altag
in Michigan Union
"Occultism and the Occult Arts"
was the subject discussed by Sen-
ora Aldag in her lecture at the
Michigan Union last night. The'
senora discussed in this lecture her

Chairman Names Committee
Heads to Assist With
Details.
TO HAVE BOOTHS
Affair to Be Held in Barbour
Gymnasium; Planned
for March 16 or 17.
Plans for the Penny Carnival are
near completion and it has been
decided that the affair will take
place either from 7:30 to 10 o'clock
Wednesday, March 16, or Saturday,
March 19, in Barbour gymnasium.
Jean Bentley, '33, is vice-presi-
dent of the Women's Athletic Asso-
ciation and is therefore automat-,
ically general chairman of the Car-
nival. The heads of the other com-
miftees are: Publicity, Marian Fo-
ley, '34; booth and floor arrange-
ments, Marian Giddings, '34; fi-
nance, Corrine Fries, '34; and en-
tertainment, Frances Manchester,
'34.

I.EADS COMMITTEE theories as to the birth and devel-
opment of the Occult Sciences.
"Occult," the senora states, "on-
ly because they deal with that part
of Nature which is still normally
imperceptible to our five senses,
but which forms part of her and is

subject to the same invariable
laws." "Soon," she continues, "the
threshold of these regions or planes
will be stepped over by physicists
and what now is considered a sup-
erstition will become a surprising
anticipation of what will be then
the 'modern science' of the day."
It is in this light, the senora be-
lieves, "that astrology, which con-
siders the stars in their trascend-
ental nature which' affects man's
higher vehicles. Numerology, which
has discovered some of God's 'geo-
metrizations' and applied them to
human life, and other fascinating
arts dealing with these occult
planes, should be considered."
The lecture to be given by Senora
*de Aldag Sunday, March 6, at 7:30
o'clock in the Committee room of
the League building will be on the
topic of "Theosophy, the search for:
the God Within and the God With-
out." She will introduce Dr. F. B.
Fisher in his lecture in the Natural
Science Auditorium at 3:30 o'clock
on the same day.

TEAMS WILL BEGINi _0
Interclass Basketball Play oAlpha Gamma Delta.
Iy O Alpha Gamma Delta held their
Continue for Three Weeks; initiation ceremonies Saturday
Last Week for Challenge. morning for the following women:
__ Arlene Howard. '33, of Dearborn;
Interclass basketball tournament Louise Van Ameringen, '35, Ann Ar-
will begin Monday, March 7, with bor. A luncheon was given at noon
two weeks of games between the at the Lantern Shop in honor of
four teams to be followed by one the new initiates. In the afternoon,
week for open challenge. the Ann Arbor alumnae of the I
Games will be played Monday,i chapter gave a bridge in their hon-
Gm es dnibespdaye ad ndayor at the League. The ceremonies
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thurs- were completed in the evening with
day. For tesophr week freshmen the "feast of roses" initiation ban-
iors will play Monday, Mar. 7. Mar. quet at the chapter house.
8 juniors and seniors will play; Chi Omega.
Mar. 9 freshmen and sophomores; Formal initiation was held Fri-
Mar. 10 juniors and sophomores, day night by Chi Omega. Those.ad-
freshmen and seniors. For the sec- mitted into the chapter were:
ond week, on Monday, Mar. 14, sen- Frances Elizabeth Cadwell, '33,
iors and juniors, freshmen and Oakmont, Pa.; Alice Goodwin, '35,
sophomores will play. Tuesday, Pitsburgh, Pa.; Dorothy Hard, '35,
Mar. 15, freshmen and juniors will Royal Oak; Harriet Long, '33, Ldng-
play; Wednesday, Mar. 16, sopho- mont, Pa.; Helen Loomis, '35, Wil-
mores and seniors; Thursday, Mar. kinsburg, Pa.; Beatrice De Vine, '35,
17, juniors and sophomores, and Ann Arbor; Gertrude Pesche, '35,
freshmen and seniors. Detroit; Mary Marrison, '35, Sara-
Games will be called for 4 o'clock. a 32ring N. Y. Eleanor Gra-
By 4:15 o'clock teams must be on hm'2AnAbr
te floor ready toplamyo must for- The initiation banquet was held
feit. There will be eight minute in the League. Sorority colors of
utTere willeeigt minutewecardinal and straw were carried in
quarters with 15 minutes between the table decorations- and several
halves. This is the regulation time. of the Detroit alumni were present.
Instructors and major students will Chi Omega also wishes to an-
act as officials. nounce the pledging of Genevieve
On the senior team the forwards Lawson, '33, of Royal Oak.
are Ella Korby, Marjorie Smith, Delta Gamma.
Violet Canberg, and Rosalynn Ca- I4__

ciety Notes..

I

Faculty to Assist.
Following the tradition, each so-
rority house and dormitory will
have a booth and prize will be giv-
en to the most original one. For
the past two years, the prize has
been given to Adelia Cheever house.
Such booths as fortune-telling,
shoe-shining, refreshment, a ndc
fish-pond parlors are a few of the
possible ideas. There are enough
varieties to suit the tastes of every-
one. Members of sororities and
dormitories should b e making
plans for their booths as a meet-
ing of the athletic managers of
each house will be called soon to
discuss arrangements.
Another traditional feature of the
affair is the entertainment which
will be presented upstairs in Sarah
Caswell Angell Hall. Numbers of
the program will be kept secret.
The faculty committee in charge
of the Penny Carnival consists of
Dr. Margaret, director of physical
education, Miss Mary Steuart, in-
structor of physical education, and
Miss Alice Lloyd, dean of women.
Must Be Eligible.
Chairmen and members of com-
mittees must be W.A.A. members
according to a new ruling. This
means that they must have earned
five points and paid one dollar.
Women on these committees must,
furthermore, be scholastically elig-
ible.
The Penny Carnival is the oldest
of the traditions now continued by
Michigan women. It is always eag-
erly looked forward to by both men
and women on the campus. As has
been the custom, a small entrance
fee will be charged, while the pro-
ducts of booths may be obtained
for a minimum sum to carry out
the "penny" idea.
NOTICE.
Women wo have not yet
sium for Badminton .practices
must do so at once. Opportun-
ity for playing may be had at
4:15 o'clock every Friday and on
Tuesday, Thursday and Satur-
.day. For further information
please see Miss Hilda Burr at
Barbour gymnasium.
Preliminaries for the swim-
ming meet are being held at 8
o'clock e v e r y Tuesday and
Thiursday night at the Union
pool. Women may practice be-
fore having their final time
taken.

Jean Bentley.

I

History of Sororities

Dey. The guards are Evelyn Bull, Delta Gamma held its annual re-
Margaret Friedrich, Esther La- union banquet Friday night, for
Rowe, and Katherine Brinley. which sixty alumnae returned to
There will be ten players on the Ann Arbor. The alumnae meeting
junior team rather than the usual took place after the banquet. Sat
number of nine a team because of urday noon, the alumnae were
the Junior Girls'. Play. The for- "honored at luncheon. In the eve-
="e=HnihgH, teaformali iitatio nanuet
wards are Lelia Hendricks, Helennithfomlntainbnqe
Brenner, Marjory Blackistone, Jean was held. Miss Mary Powersof
Botsford, and Jean Berridge. The Detroit acted as toastmistress. The
guards will be Florence Bonisteel, speakers were Miss Jean Duffield,
Laura Sommers, Genevieve Lawson, 30, who spoke for the alumnae;
Louse Peterson, and Sarah Lewis, Virginia Olds, '32, speaker for the
alternate seniors; and Nan Dieble, '35 speak-

ALPHA EPS

FBy Margar

}

"Multa corda; una causa"-many
hearts, one purpose, is the open
motto of the Alpha Epsilon Phi so-
rority, which was founded nation-
ally October 24, 1909, at Barnard
college, New York city. It has
spread rapidly since its origin, and
has 27 chapters in states all over
the country.
The sorority installed its Pi chap-
ter here in 1921, when a group of
six women founded it in a room on
Washington avenue. Its third home
is its present location on Hill
street.
The badge of Alpha Epsilon Phi
consists of the three Greek letters
mounted on a bar, studded with
twenty-seven pearls. The pledge
pin is a simulated Greek temple.
The flower is the lily, and the so-
rority colors are green and white.
The national office of the orga-
nization is located in New Orleans,
and a national publication, the
Columns, is issued to all the chap-
ters. Elizabeth Eldredge holds the

SILON PHI
et O'Brien]
office of national president.
Alpha Epsilon Phi's altruistic
work is threefold. The sorority
has established a hundred dollar
scholarship in every school where
a chapter is located, and also con-j
tributes to the New York Jewishl
School of Social Service. Funds are
also supplied to the Hebrew Union
school, Cincinnati, which educates
women from small communities.
Outstanding alumnae o f the
group include Mrs. Florence Kain, l
a member of the United States
House of Representatives, and Mrs.
Hannah Soloman, prominent in
philanthropic circles.

"
,'.
a

For the sophomores the forwards
are Elizabeth Cooper, Alta Place,
Charlotte Johnson, Ruth Kurtz and
Ethelyn Jones. The guards will be
Endora Mortin, Alice Goodenow,
Lydia Seymour, and Corinne Fries.
For the freshmen team the for-
wards will be Hilda Kirby, Louise
Little, Lavinia Creighton, Freder-
icka Waldon, and Ruth Root. The
guards will be Alice Morgan, Marie
Metzger, Barbara Sutherland, and
Jane Hopkins.
At the first meeting of the teams
on Monday, Mar. 7, captains and
names will be picked.

er for the freshmen. The table was
adorned with spring flowers of
bronze, pink, and blue, the sorority
colors. The girls who formally be-
came members of the chapter were
MUSICAL
EVENTS
All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given
without admission charge.

I i

HIGH GRADE REPAIR SERVICE

I

I

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry

V.

WASSILIY BESEKIRSKY, Vio-
linist, MABEL ROSS RH-EAD,
Pianists, in S o n a t a Recital,
March 6, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano,
March 7, 8:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
March 13, 4:15.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Violin-
cellist, in Sonata Recital, March
27, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
March 31, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA; David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violincellist, April 3,
4:15.

_v v
_ n1' Th Tm

L

19

a

-1

PERMANENT WAVES
Take advantage of
our low end-of- season
special prices. All
waves complete with
shampoo and set at
no extra charge.

I

U .d

I

I

a

A THREE DAY

BEAUTY SPECIAL

WAVEOLINE SYSTEM-A real wave at
a popular $3.00
aplrprice ........................ .0
MARCELINE OIL WAVE-a recondi-
tioning oil$.5
system . ... .......... .........LP4 .-u v
CURLINE PROCESS - Our very
best $6.00
wave ........................
Shampoo, Finger Wave. Arch, Marcell,
Manicure, Facial, Hot Oil, any one 50c,
any two 75c
PUBLIX
BEAUTY SHOPPE
201 E. Liberty St.
Phone 23414

Monday

* Tuesday

0 Wednesday

PERMANENT WAVING...... . . $5.00
Special Oil Shampoo

STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
April 21, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
NELL B. STOCKWELL, Pianist,
April 24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MARJORIE MCCLUNG, So-
prano, April 29, 4:15, Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
VIRGINIA HAMISTER, Pianist,
May 3, 4:15, Meadelssohn The-
atre.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, in Organ
Recital, every Wednesday at
4:15 unless otherwise announced.
HELEN VAN LOON, Pianist,
April 19, 4:15, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
HELEN VAN LOON, Soprano,
May 2, 4:15, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.

World's Fastest Dryers

DiMattia Beauty Shop

I Phone 8878

338 South State Street

Phone 8878

.9

i

III

l

ROS PONSELLE

Prima donna soprano of the Metro-

politan Opera Company will

give

a recital in the Choral Union Series

in Hill Auditorium.

spring

spring's a fkkle jade. now you see her, now you
don't. and then, some summer day, she sniles at

f

limited number of tickets still available
f Musat .11.05.n 10- .0-00 n d

at the School
I n 4

you and out you go to buy new clothes

11

. . .

~01

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan