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October 07, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEC MICHIGAN DAILY

. .. . ......... ........ . . ....... .. ........ ... .......

cs Even Seres

W alump . t 3 "Now U ' i; Cards Get 2

I~h

., I

AR TIN GONTIES
ro] SATPLATE
kthletics Gather 10 Hits From
Johnson, Lindsey and
Derringer.
FIRST INNING
St. Louis: -Flowers flied out to
:aas in center. Watkins popped to
arnshaw. Frisch flied out to Sim-
ons in left field. No runs, no hits,
o errors.
Philadelphia: Bishop singled over
cond. Haas laid down a sacrifice
int along the third base line,
ishop taking second. Cochrane
rounded out to Bottomley, Bishop
king third. Simmons doubled over
iort, scoring Bishop. Foxx walked.
iller fouled to Wilson behind the
ate. One run, two hits, no errors,
SECOND INNING
St. Louis: Bottomley hit a high
u1 to Foxx at first. Rafey ground-
i out, third to first. Martinstruoc
it. No runs, no hits, no errors.
Philadelphia: Flowers was replac-
I by High at third for the Cardin-
s. Dykes singled to center. Wil-
ams struck out. Earnshaw ground-
I out, Johnson to Bottomley, with
ykes taking second. Bishop flied
Martin in center. No runs, one
.t, no errors.
THIRD INNING
St. Louis: Wilson flied out to Sim-
ons in left. Gelbert grounded to.
ottomley at first. Johnson struck
it. No runs, no hits, no errors.
Philadelphia: Haas singled to
ght. Cochrane forced Haas at
cpnd, Frisch to Gelbert to Bot-
mley, Bottomley fumbling Gel-
rt's throw. Simmons hit into a
uble play, Frisch to Gelbert to
>ttomley. No runs, one hit, one
ror.
FOURTH, INNING
St. Louis: High grounded out,
trnshaw to Foxx. Watkins flied out
Miller in 'right. Frisch walked.
isch stole second. Bottomley was
-rick out. 'No runs, no hits, no
rors. ,
Philadelphia: Foxx grounded out,
ort to first. Miller popped to Gel-
'rt at short. Dykes grounded out.
D runs, no hits, no errors.
FIFTH INNING
St. Louis: Hafey grounded out,
.ort to first. Martin singled be-
een short and third. Wilson struck
t. Martin stole second. Gelbert
ruck out. No runs, one hit, no
rors.
Philadelphia: Williams struck out.
irnshaw flied out to Gelbert at
.ort. Bishop hit a hard grounder
Bottomley, who was unable to
ke the putout. Haas forced
shop at second, Gelbert' to Frisch.
> runs, one hit, no errors.
SIXTH INNING
St. Louis: Johnson was called out
. strikes. High grounded out to the
tcher's box. Watkins flied out to
rnmons in left. No runs, no hits,
errors.
Philadelphia: Cochrane drove a
ter to Martin in center. Simmons]
ed to Martin. Foxx hit a home
n over the left field stands. Miller
ubled to center field. Dykes sin-
ed to left, Miller scoring from
:ond. Williams singled between
ort and third, Dykes taking sec-
d. Lindsey replaced Johnson at
e mound for St. Louis. E arnshaw
uck out, ending the inning. Two
ns, four hits, no errors.
SEVENTH INNIlG
St. Louis: Frisch grounded out,
rnshaw to Foxx. Bottomley struck
.t. Hafey flied to Miller in right.
> runs, no hits, no errors.
iiladelphia: Bishop flied out to
atkins in right. Haas struck out.
ichrane walked. Simmons singled
er second, Cochrane taking third,

id Simons taking second on Mar-4
a's relay to third. Foxx flied out
Martin in center. No runs, one.
(Continued on Page 7)

Loser
Game.

of First Series L ER S RS
Defeats Capt. Lenfesty, 4-3, in
Opening Golf Match; Martin
Wins Over Root.

Capt. Lenfesty of the Varsity
golf team lost his championship
match to Oliver, 4-3, yesterday af-
ternoon in the first round of the
All-Campus golf tournament over
the University course. Martin also
defeated Root by the same margin
in the only other match completed
yesterday.
These were the first matches in
the championship flight for the
Varsity Cup. Sixteen men were en-
tered in the flight. Other matches
will be continued today.
UNION GIVES FREE
SWIAMING LESSON
Members of the Michigan Union
will be afforded a chance to get
some instruction in swimming and
billiards free of charge. Mr. John
McMahon will instruct swimming
classes on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday afternoons at the following
hours: Monday, 3:30 and 4:00; Wed-
nesday, 4:00 and 4:30; and Friday,
3:30 and 4:00.
Mr. M. H. Williamson will instruct
carom and pocket billiards everyI
afternoon.
GALVESTON, Tex.-(P)--Numer-
ous entries assure the success of
the terrapin derby scheduled for
the city auditorium here November
2 and 3, it has been announced by
the Boosters' club, sponsor of the
evening.

GALLOPING GAEL
LEAGUE UPSE]
By John Thomas
The Bells of St. Marys are vibrat-
ing from the Moragan hills of Cali-
fornia with wild acclaim for the
Galloping Gaels whose recent raid
upon the Coast Conference has re-
sulted in two victories.
St. Marys is the most colorful of
the Far West football teams, draw-
ing from a student body of seven
hundred, yet boasting triumphs
over U.S.C., California, U.C.L.A., Or-
egon, Stanford and many others.I
Last September 26 the Galloping
Gaels used an air raid to conquer
Southern California, where they
played before a crowd estimated to
be 104,000 and last Saturday they
defeated the University of° Califor-
nia Bears 14 to 0 before 80,000 spec-
tators. One hundred and eighty-four
thousand spectators in two games
and ten years ago the registration
at St. Mary's College was seventy.
Coached-by Rockne Man.
Coached by Ed "Slip" Madigan, a
Notre Dame product, they opened a
bombardment on the Bears' defense
with bullet-like passes. Just as those
passes spelled defeat for the Tro-
jans a week before, they did for the
Golden Bears last Saturday."
These two victories were gained
by a green team. Ten lettermen
graduated including the famed Blue
Ghost backfield of last year. But
this is typical of the odds faced by
'St. Mary's with each succeeding fall
and with startling regularity, Madi-
gan has sent a green team into bat-
tle and watched them sweep on to
one smashing triumph after anoth-
er.
Rose to Heights.
According to Will Stevens in "In-
tercollegiate Sports," Madigan sent

S RAID COAST
TTING TWO TEAMS
a green team to undefeated heights
in 1926 and then duplicated the
feat in 1929, taking on the hardest
opposition that could be scheduled.
Of the e'turning veterans, Angel
Brovell., the sophomore fullback
who vLhno t single-handed wrecked
Major Frank Cavanaugh's perfect
football machine at Fordhamrlast
year, is the best.
Toscani Is Passer,
Fletcher and Toscani are the two
backs who seem to be the key Gaels
in the air attack. Both are able re-
ceivers and are brilliant in passing.
The Golden Bears saw Toscani pass
to Sheflin 35 yards to put the ball
on the one-yard and then later two
long passes Baird to Toscani and
Toscani to Baird put the ball in po-
sition for Baird to pass to Canrinus
for the second score.
The Trojans saw the same kind
of bullet-like passes beat them the
week before, 13 to 7. These sky raids
have put the Galloping Gaels on
top of the West Coast football situ-
ation. And ten years ago St. Marys
had an enrollment of seventy.
SPORT WRITERS
Sophomores and second semes-
ter Freshmen interested in try-
ing out for the Sports Staff of
the Daily report at the Sport
desk in the Press Building this
afternoon at 4:30.
Sheldon Fullerton, Sports Editor
Gets Dodo With Midiron
OKLAHOMA CITY-(IP)--Using a
midiron, Cecil Clark wafted the
ball into the cup from No. 1 tee at
the Edgemere links here. The hole
measures 212 yards.

V rs tyCic~ago Tilt
tRecalls Old Rivalry
By ShWldQoA C. Ful1rton
When Michigan's football eleven
faces Chicago here this coming Sat-
utrday, sports fans will see a renew-
al of a rivalry that has been oneof
the longest and finest that middle
western football has ever known.
Coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, starting
his fortieth year at the helm of the
Maioons, and Fielding H. Yost.
Mrichigan athletic director, for many
seasons placed t:rms on the field
that battled desperately for Big Ten
honors.
Statistics covering Westernl
Coinferenec fo'otball from the
years 185 to 1931 show that
Michigan and Chicago have by
far the best Perenages ac-
co rding to games won and lost
of any othier teams it the Eig
Ten. The Wolverines during this
period have taken '7 4.1p~rrc~nt
of their Contests, whie Ulcncago
is in second place with 63.0 per-
cent, five full percentage points,
ahead of Illinois, Minnesota,
and Wisconsin who are staging
a close fight for third place.
Chicago has also been one of the
better offensive clubs in the Con-
ference, during the same stretch of
years. Again. Michigan leads the
parade, with an average of 16.9
points per game, while the Midway
aggregation is third with 13.5 points
per contest, one whole point behind
Minnesota.

MediQcre Material Forms Most
of Squad .With a Few
Outstanding Men.
Once more Coach Ray Fisher is
handling the first year football as-
pirants and drilling them in the
fundamentals of the gridiron game.
Practically every day from sixty
to seventy-five first year students
turn out for their daily workout
on South Ferry field.
A Few Stars
The general run of the squad is
about the same as it has been in
the past few seasons--a wealth of
mediocre material with a few out-
standing players much further ad-
vanced than the majority of the
squad. Among those men showing
the greatest promise are some for-
mer high school grid greats, such
as Beckwith, Patchin and Ward
who were placed on many mythi-
cal elevens.
Tried on Scrimmages
Coach Fisher assisted by his
staff of former'Wolverine football
heroes is rounding his men into
condition and has already had op-
nortunities to look them over in
the intersquad scrimmages which
have taken place.
All of the candidates have dis-
played a good fighting spirit and
a willingness to learn prevails
among those who Have not had
as much experience as those fur-
ther advanced.

Brilliant rookie pitcher of the St.j
Louis Cardinals. After havig a
minor operation performed on his
nose on Monday, he returned yes-
terday afternoon to retire the Ath-
letics in order in the ninth inning,
after relieving Jim Lindsey. He
lost the first game of the series,
although he pitched brilliant ball.
Qualifying Round
WillClose Today
Two Men Tied for Leadership
in Faculty Tourney.
Faculty golfers must play their
qualifying round today if they plan
to play in the faculty golf tourna-
ment that has ben arranged by the
Intramural department. The play-
ers who signify their intentions to
enter this tournament will be placed
in flights according to the scores
turned in during their qualifying
rounds.
At the present time Niehaus and
Cissel are tied for the best scores,
each of them shooting an 82 in
their 'qualifying rounds. some eight
strokes behind them, and in third
place, is Sutherland with 90, while
Lovell has taken fourth position
with 92.
Naugh, Adams, and Brumm are
closely bunched for the next three
positions. Other players in order or
placement are Mitchell, Hardy,
Eddy, Pollock, Housel, Ayres, Brad-
shaw, Shull, Connor, Auelier, Cal-
;oun, and Wilson.

Once more the Wolverines
lead the Conference, this time
in the ma tter of defense. For
this 35-year period Michigan
has held its opponents to an
average of 5.3 points per game.
(Continued on Page 7)

, . ,

11

FOOTWEAR, INC.
588 FIFTH AVENUE, NEAR 48th STREET
NEW YORK CITY
Exhibiting this week at
GEORGE HUGHES, REP.

83rd

Anniversary
values-

I'

0

.77-- .

.-

The

Trenclh Coats.
Rubberized waterproof
$4.95
Loose fined gaerdine
$7.95

I

Michigan

Union

I

l

I

announces,

MacGregor

Sweaters

Two

New

Features

zephyr wool sleeveless
$3.00

r l\
We Present
MICHIGAN
MODEL SUITS
$29.50, $34.50 and
$39.50
Designed by us for men of
Michigan, and proclaimed
style leaders by all who have
seen them.
With two trousers
COLLEGIAN
TOPCOATS, $24.75
213 East Liberty

for Its embers

Mr. John W. MacMahon will instruct

Leather Blouses
Suede with ful zipper
$110.50
Riding Breeches
Leather trimmed Bedfords

swimming classes

on Monday, Wednes-

I

day and Friday afternoons.

.l

A.

AA
EN-AVANT ever forward A
A
A
AA
A A
Burr, Patterson & Auld Co.
Ma enaI ctuafrin Fratornity Jewalers
Detroit, Michigan & Wakerville, Ontario
A A +^
A ^
A For your convenience
Ann6
AnK A Ko rStore .
A 603 Church St.
FRANK OAKES:,Zmsr.

Mr. M1/I. H. Williamson will instruct

$6.50

carom and pocket billiards

every

after-

noon.

y-r"
WAU 4B

THESE SERVICES ARE ABSOLUTELY
FREE TO MEMBERS OF THE UNION

S TAT E

STJLEET

'I

1

42

Years of Doing One

Thing Supremely Well
POR .TRAITS

FINE

'ENSIAN

G. .vA

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