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October 07, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

dished every morning except Monday during the University year
Board in Control of Student Publications.
nber of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
ion of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published herein.
ered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
natter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
ter General.

cription by carrier, $4.00; br mail, $4.50

}

ices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
an. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L.ETOBIN
Editor.......... ....................David M. NIchol
at Director.........................Beach Conger, Jr.
ditor ............. ........ .....Carl Forsythe
Editor .............................Sheldon C. Fullerton
's Editor........................Margaret M. Thompson
Reflections............ ...... ...Bertram J. Askwith
:nt News Editor.........................Robert L. Pierce

NIGHT EDITORS
B. Gllbreth J. Cullen Kennedy
Goodman Denton C. Kunze
Karl Seiffert George
Sports Assistants
r J. Myers John W. Thomas

Jerry E. Rosenthal
A. Stauter
John S. Townsend
Charles 'A. Sanford

REPORTERS
nley Arnheim James Krotozyner
n Bagley Robert Merritt
son E. Becker Henry Meyer
mas Connellan Marion Milezewski
lph R. Cooper Albert Newman
ter M. Harrison Jerome Pettit
ton Helper John Pritchard
ieph Hoffmanl Joseph Renihan
phine Woodhams Beatrice Collins
ette Cummings Ethel Arehart
othy Brockman Barbara Hall
a Wadsworth Susan Manchester
jorie Thomson Margaret O'Brien
rgia Geisman Louise Crandall

Alfred Stresen-Reuter
William Thal
G. R. Winters
Charles Woolner
Brackley Shaw
Ford Spikerman
Parker Snyder

Cile Miller
Elsie Feldman
Eileen Blunt
Eleanor Rairdon
Martha Littleton
Prudence Foster

BUSINESS STAFF,
Telephooe 21214
CHARLES T. KLINE........................... Business Manager
NORRIS P. JOHNSON....., ..............Assistant Manager
Department Managers
Advertising ...... ............................ ..Vernon Bishop
Advertising ................... ..........RobertaB.Callahan
ldvertisng .... ...................... .. William W. Davis
Service..........................Byron C. Tedder
Publigations .................................William T. Brown
Jirculation ..................................Harry R. Begley
Accounts........... .....................Richard Stratenieer
Women's Business Manager . ...........A..........nn W. Verner
Assistants
)rvil Aronsen Willard Freehling Thomas Roberts
Gilbert E. Bursley Herbert Greenstone R. A. Saltzstein
Willard A. Combo John Keyser Bernard E. Schnacke
Alen Clark Arthur F. Kohn Graf ton Ws. Sharp
lustave Dalberg Bernard H. Good Cecil E. Welch
Robert E. Finn James Lowe
Kathryn Bayless Ann Gallrmeyer Helen Olsen
Dona Becker Ann Harsha Marjorie Rough'
Genevieve Field Kathryn Jackson Mary E. Watts
Maxine Fischgrund ' Dorothy Laylin
NIGHT EDITOR-JAMES INGLIS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1931
Mimes Revives
A Michigan Opera
REPORTS have come from Mimes to the effect
that it may revive the Opera which seemingly
lied two years ago. Should the organization do
uch a thing, encouragement in the project shouldi
ot be found wanting, that is, if it is found to be
worth-while.
The Opera went out of existence two years
go for several reasons. The main one was finan-
ial. Lack of interest was another. When thet
production which would portray Michigan andt
)pera was first inaugurated, it was intended to bet

to his credit, has again chosen the subject of modern
youth.
The cast is headed by a trio of co-featured players
--Roger Pryor, Margaret Sullivan, conceded by critics
to be a "new find," and Herbert Rawlinson, screen
star.
The Chicago Civic Shakespeare Society will begin
a week's engagement at the Cass Theatre in Detroit
Monday evening. The following plays will be given:
"Hamlet" on Monday night, Tuesday night and Sat-
urday matinee. "Julius Caeser" on Wednesday and
Friday nights. "The Merchant of Venice" Wednes-
day matinee, Thursday night and Saturday night.
The Society was founded three years ago by Mr.
Harley L. Clarke for the presentation of the plays of
Shakespeare in Chicago and the larger American
cities. Among members of the cast are Fritz Leiber,
Helen Menken, William Faversham, Tyrone Power,
Viola Roache and Pedro de Cordoba. The production
has been directed by George Vivian.
ANPUV SOPEIIIION
To The Editor: f
As a resident of New York State and a staunch
Democrat, I hardly feel that I can let the editorial
entitled "Hoover's Chance in 1932" go unchallenged.
The editorial concedes that the only step Mr. Hoover
has taken in the present crisis was to pass the inter-
national debt moratorium. As I see it, the part played
by Mr. Hoover was in signature only. The leading
banks and economists forced our government into
such action. There was nothing else to do. The debtor
nations were absolutely unable to pay. After all,
blood cannot be extracted from stones.
My claim is that a progressive government would
have passed the debt moratorium long before the
present crisis had set in. The present depression
did not come without warning. Warnings were
sounded nine months preceding the eventful stock
crashes by the Federal Reserve Board, banks and
other institutions. The Democratic party has shown
its progressiveness in the past by their up-to-date
diplomacy in foreign affairs, by the formation of a
League of Nations to which the Republican party so
selfishly scorned, and by the passage of the Federal
Reserve Act which has weathered both war and de-
pression. Where would our country be today were
it not for the Federal Reserve System?
The editorial further admits that while the G.O.P.
has done little to aid the current situation, neither
have the Democrats. At least the Democrats haven't
harmed anyone. The passage of the Hawley-Smoot
administration Tariff Bill under Mr. Hoover is one
of the major causes of the depression. It is impossible
for me to conceive any reason why the citizenry of
the United States should pay for products, which
due to u-nfavorable geographic conditions makes it
impossible for American producers to efficiently pro-
duce at low cost. Such tariff is nothing more than
protection for the inefficient producer. Still the old
political "gag" concerning the resulting unemploy-
ment from the vast flow of foreign goods produced
by cheap foreign labor is still working well and will
continue to do so until America wakes up. However,
so much for that.
Now, turning to the presidential candidates for'
1932. In my mind there is not a more capable man
today than ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith, but he was
turned down by the American people in 1928 and will
be in 1932 if he attempts to run again. Was it because
of his lack of a college education, his conection with
Tammany, or his alleged advocacy of the repeal of
the 18th amendment? No, it was none of these-it
was religion. Getting rather narrow-minded, aren't
we?
A close second to ex-Governor Smith is present
Governor Roosevelt. From all appearances it looks as
though it is going to be a Hoover-Roosevelt combat
There is no need of discussing these gentlemen. Thei
past records display quite thoroughly their capabili-
ties. Am I alone with my ideas or are there others?
I am afraid we will have to wait until 1932 to find
that out.

ASTED RLLV
T O WELL, WE
DID THE BEST
WE COULD
Yep, we certainly did. We went
right out on the diagonal and stop-
ped any number of women and
tried our very hardest to get a de-
cent answer out of them but with-
out much success. Perhaps the
fact that we were scared stiff had
an infectious effect on those we
were interviewing, for most of
them were very, shy, very demure,
very anxious to get somewhere els
right away, and worst of all, very
non-committal. Most of t h e m
wouldn't even stop. However, we
are happy to state that there were
a few who answered right up like
brave little girls, and boy, do we
like them! These .few are probably
the swellest women on the cam-
pus, and as far as the rest are con-
cerned they can all go out and die.
Yes, and good enough for them.
(Note: This includes the Women's
Staff, who wouldn't help us a bit.
We won't mention any names be-
cause they're all printed in the left
upper corner of this page.)
WHO ASKED ....... A whole
bunch of women who crossed the
Diagonal between 1:30 and 2:15.
QUESTIONS A S K E D.......
HOW DO THE MEN ON THE UNI-
VERSITY OF MICHIGAN CAMPUS
COMPARE IN ATTRACTIVENESS
WITH THE MEN IN YOUR HOME
TOWN.
RESULTS
Ann Verner; Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan: I think they are every bit as
handsome as the boys in Ann Ar-
bor." (Editor's Note: Ann was very
earnest about all this.)
Mary-Kathryn Snyder; Elmira,
N. Y.: "What a funny question. I
think I would say they compared
pretty favorably." (Editor's Note:
Miss Snyder was very anxious that
her name be spelled correctly. I
hope, for Miss Snyder's sake, that
the linotyper doesn't go astray at
this point.)
Jane Colby: East Cleveland,
Ohio: "Yes, they compare favor-
ably. No, I think I can say more
than that-very favorably." (Edi-
tor's Note: Miss Colby also com-
pares pretty favorably. P. S. The
Editor lives in Cleveland top. Oh
boy!)
May Seefried; Pontiac, Michi-
gan: "Oh, I think they compare
very favorably, on the whole. No,
I don't want to give my name. Oh,
all right then, but what will the
people in Pontiac think."
NO RSULTS
1.-"Most of the men at home
are out here. I'm from Detroit."
2.-"Quite favorable. Heh, heh,
heh. Oh, no. Heh, heh, heh."
3.-"We're in a hurry, some other
time."
4.-"Yes, I do."
5.-"Say yes."
6.-"They are not!"
7.-"I agree with her."
3.-"Ho ho ho ho, that's enough.'
9.-"Yeah."

10.-"No, I've already done that."
On the whole we would say
that the results of the after-
noon were pretty fairly dis-
couraging, and it will take a lot
of candy and persuasion to get
us out there again. Yes, we
mean it! From now on we are
going to lay off of Campus
Beauty. We won't even men-
tion it again. Not even so much
as one small mention!
* * *
GEMS FROM THE WORLD'S
SERIES
"Well folks, there must be about
thirty-five thousand people here
today. It certainly is-wupp! There
goes the National Anthem.....
... Well, ladies and gentlemen, it
certainly was an inspiring sight to
see forty thousand people standing
here in Shibe Park while the band
layed "The Star-Spangled Ban-
ner." Well, all we can say is, that
the people of Shibe Park have no
respect for our country's honor.
About five thousand entered the
?rounds during the playing of the
Anthem. Disgusting!
** *
OH GOLLY, A QUANDARY
For the last week or so we have
>een worrying about a pen-name
or ourself. Neither Smiley nor
ohnny Chuck seems to appeal to
he masses, and we don't know

3 , ,

K

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KILLINS GRAVEL
COMPANY
Telephone 7112

VISIBLE INK SUPPLY
BIGGERIN
A/Aa
YES SIR, you can tell how many words are left it A
Conklin Nozac by merely looking at the visible ink
section. And because there is no rubber sac in the
barrel, the Nozac provides a new, immensely greater
lrjR ink capacity-35% more than other pens of the same
size. You will run out of ideas long before "the pen
that winds like a watch" runs out of ink. Here is the
pen of modern times-the sub-machine gun of the
orthographical bandit. All-opaque barrel if so
desired. Step right into any really up-to-date
supply store and look the Nozac over, You'll
be wearing one when you leave. Priced in
conformity with the times at $6 and $10,
pencils to match $3.50 and $5.00. Other
snappy Conklins in new shapes and
ultra -modish colors $2.75 to $8.
Pencils $1.00 to $4.50.
The No ac ftiting d e cev s a
remarkable new invention never
before employed in the fountain
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TOLEDO, OHIO
Chicago San Francisco
DEALERS, stock and show the pens that sell.
Write for catalog.

.;R Y 0 A . 44''

,

Announcing

..

PERSONAL STATIONERY
PREFERRED * * *

PRINTED WITH NAME AND ADDRESS
"The Final Touch to Courteous Correspondence"
NOW ON DISPLAY FOR YOUR INSPECTION

PRICED FROM
$1.00 to $2.50
PER BOX;

*I
0. D. MORRHEL
314 South State Street
The Stationery and Typewriter Store
If you write, we have it

e

I

he campus in some way or another. For a num-
er of years, such was the case. After a time,
owever, ambitious Mimes producers began tc
reate an Opera which became almost a foreigr
roduction. The shows reached garantuan heights.
Jo longer were the plots centered around studeni
fe, no more were catchy tunes arising from the
cores to live forever in Michigan music; gone
ras the familiarity which had characterized pasi
)pera performance.I
Five years before the final end, the handwriting
n the wall was plainly visible. Everyone knew
hat the Opera could not continue to try and rival
iegfeld nor tour the country every year at an
stounding loss to its supporters. The Opera had
ierely grown too large for itself and when the end
rally came, no one mourned its passing.
Last year, however, when Mimes put on the
vue, "Aw Nuts," a need for the Opera was evi-
ent. The spirit of this annual entertainment, for
>me reason or other, was again imbued in the
udent body and in the last year, has been steadily
gaining its popularity. r
We hope, however, that, should the Opera
me back, Mimes will profit by its previous ex-
rience and give us an undergraduate show.
ichigan wants its Opera back but it does not
ant pseudo-professional spectacles wholly for-
gn to its tastes. A student production, by stu-
ents, for students and smacking at least a little
t of undergraduate life, we believe, is what the
tmpus wants. Mimes should revive its Opera but
e warn it to let us have a Mimes show and not a
or attempt at mimicking professional produc-

,,
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Sotdyeatrs of operation

and not a dime for maintenance

J. V. F., '34E.

t

II

II

EDI[T]ORIAL COMMENT

(The Columbia Spectator)

o.

District attorneys in various parts of the country
manage to uncover new and unusual rackets almost
daily. Occasionally the racketeers' somewhat unethi-
cal methods of obtaining funds from fellow country-
men are illegal and may be attacked through the
usual court machinery; but all too often the rackets
are conducted with a basis of legality although the
intent is obviously illegal and against the principles
of civilized morality.
With faculty salaries always too low, and author-
ship as one of the few methods open to instructors
to obtain a few added shekels, there islittle reason
to be surprised that these gentlemen occasionally
allow themselves to reap royalties through the none-
too-savory method of requiring their students to pur-
chase the books for regular courses. Not infrequently,
the book or books in question are of little or no use
in the course.
If accused of this racket, faculty members seem
to be more inclined to modify their courses to fit
their own books than to discontinue the practice.
Little can be donehbynappealing to codes of ethical
action, so, hoping to exterminate two buffalo with
one carbine, we suggest less squeezing of the de-
pressed student purse, and greater padding of the
faculty bank accounts through increased credits on
the salary side of the ledger.
We understand that archeologists have taken
wheat from the tombs of Egyptian pharoahs at
Ghizeh that was later planted and developed normal-
ly. It seems plain now that the federal farm board
is merely after another record.
* * * *
The library extension service has compiled more
than 250 different lists of reference books, not one of
them, we'll wager, covering the all-important ques-
tl.i "1Ahernpare nall hC nne nree sn.,

s
t
x~
t
z~

LUsiC and DRAMA

DETROIT
As a special attraction, Miss Bonstelle has secured
Ar. and Mrs. Charles Coburn for a two weeks' engage-
nent at the Detroit Civic Theatre. Mr. and Mrs. Co-
urn will open Monday night in "The Plutocrat," the
ilarious comedy written by Arthur Goodrich from
tie novel by Booth Tarkington. The week of Octo-
er 19, Mr. and Mrs. Coburn will star in Shakespeare's
arce, "The Merry Wives of Windsor."
Arthur Goodrich is the man who is responsible for
So This Is London," and "The Plutocrat" has several
ualities in common with the former hit. Both plays
eal with Americans abroad and the funny folks they
feet. The scenes are laid on an ocean liner and in
gypt.

FTER seven solid years of operation, the gas-fired tunnel kiln in the
picture shows no signs of deterioration. The brickwork is as perfect
as when it was brand new. Heat input from gas is so uniform that there is no chance for irregular
expansion and contraction of the brick . . they'll last indefinitely, It is interesting to note, too,
that not a single dime has been spent on maintenance on this kiln in all its seven years' uninter-
rupted operation. Send for the new book "Gas Heat in Incdustry".

I

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