100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AN DAILY

ugan

Wins,

Opening

Cxames9

2 7

to

0,

34

tc

IUMORE ST ARS
W'LVERINES
r Throws Perfect Passes
Poor Receiving Robs
Team of Scores.
ON PLUNGES WELL
y Fulfills Predictions
Starring in Both
Football Games.
Continued From Page 1)
time it was Omar LaJeu-
ao sent the ball over the
,s for the extra point.
an was far superior to its
. all departments of the
nassing a total of 15 first
one for Normal, gaining
212 yards from scrimmage
rison with the Huron's 16,
ng passes that totalled 51
Ypsilanti's 35, and averag-
irds on punts as compared
rivals' 32.
'st game of the afternoon,
i Central State, began with
of a top-

WALLY ROETTGER CROSSES PLATE WITH FIRST RUN
OF WORLD SERIES IN OPENING GAME AT ST. LOUIS

TAGTBALL STARTS
.Non-Fraternity Men Requested
to Register Names.t
Prcparatons are now being made
by the ta:. of the Intramural De-
partmnt for the start of the Inde-
pendc ut team competition of the
year. The organized competition
among non-fraternity men on the
campus is conducted similar to
that for the Greek letter societies,
a point system being the basis for
determining the winner.
Each fall the Intramural author-
ities have experienced a great deal
of difficulty in organizing this
group and it- is hoped that this!
year the men interested will phone
in their names or place them oni
the various bulletins around thej
campus. Freshmen that would'
otherwise be kept out of competi-
tion by deferred rushing will thus
have a definite means of getting
i the annual fall and winter pro-
gram of the department.
The first sport of the year will
be a new one, tag football. Tack-
ling is eliminated in this game
which is otherwise played as regu-
lation football with a great deal of
emphasis on forward and lateral
passing. Most men have tried this
game on their own and now have
a chance to pit themselves against
an organized field of contestants.
During the course of the year a
program for Independents covering
ten sports will be carried with an
award offered for the winning and
runner-up groups.

Martin, Bottomley
lahai Star
Two Gai

W ITBR
, Grove, Hal-
in Firs:
mes.

With the two opening games of
the 1931 World Series divided be-
twee ithe Athletics and St. Louis,
great reversals of form have been
noticable. Probably the greatest
was the failure of the usually very
dependable Athletic hitters to con-
nect in the pinches in their 2 to
0 defeat last Friday.
Another great upset in the dope
is personified by "Pepper" Martin,
brilliant young center fielder of the
Red Birds. A week ago it was ru-
mored that this youngster who has
performed so brilliantly through-
out the season would be kept out
of the opening games with an in-
jured ankle, or that if he played,
he would be playing on sheer nerve.
However Martin has never worked
better in his life.
His hitting to date has been the
feature of the series and his bril-
liant base-running was a great
factor in downing the White Ele-
phants. The third surprise is "Sun-
ny Jim" Bottomley, veteran St.
Louis first sacker, who after being
the "goat" of the team in the last
World Series has already atoned
by a brilliant fielding performance.
"Lefty" Grove will return to the
mound on Monday in an effort to
give Philadelphia an edge in the
series. Grove won handily on

ILLANGY IN SERIES
Thursday, largely through his abil-
ity to cqtrnch the Cardinal fire .1t
crucial moments, but should the
Red Birds turn in what Gabby
Street, St. Louis manager, terms
"that third hit," the veteran port-
sider may find himself in difficulty
comparable to the first inning 0
the first game. Youthful Paul Der-
ringer, who is thirsting for revenge.
or the veteran Burleigh Grimes,
who as yet has not seen service,
will face Grove tomorrow after-
noon.
Lack Pinch Hitters
The 'large weakness in the Ath-
letics lies in a lack of pinch hitters,
Jimmy Moore, young outfielder,
having been used withdut much
success. Of the younger players
Dib Williams, the A's shortstop
who is playing his first series, i,
acquitting himself every bit as ef-
fectively as the veteran Joe Boley,
kept out of the games by injuries.
George Watkins and Wally Roett-
ger, who have split up the right-
field job for the National League
club, have both batted hard to
date. Watkins hits right handed
flingers and Roettger, portsiders.
The biggest hole in the Cardin-
als lies at third base where Andy
High and Jake Flowers are at-
tempting to fill the shoes of "Spar-
ky" Adams, who wrenched his an-
kle in a field meet a week ago. Al-
thodgh both men are capable field-
ers both are notoriously light hit-
ters and Adams' punch is sorely
miussed.

1 verines
er's long

Wally Roettger, Cardinal outfileder, is here shown scoring the first rin of the 1931 world series at
St. Louis. Roettger, the second man up for the Cards, got on base by virtue of a single, advanced on Frisch's
single, and 'scored on Bottomley's infield hit to Williams. Roettger was first man of the series to get on
base, the first to get a hit, and the first to score.

Jack Hes-
as responsi- .
r: the first r.'
and Blue
less than
nutes after
and of the
g whistle.
cond touch-
:ame when
ox plunged Morrison
om the Teacher's one-yard
fter a 15-yard penalty had
the ball in that position.
tossed a pass to Petoskey,
as unguarded over the goal
r the final score of the per-
each instance Petoskey boot-
extra point.
Varsity reserves' last score of
ne came in the final period,
chmidt carried the ball over
he two-yard line after Stone
had intercepted a
Ventral State pass
to place the ball
in scoring posi-'
tion near the op-
.ntalponents' goal.
The figures on
the second game
showed Michigan
making 15 first
downs to five for
their opponents,
gaining 292 yards
from scrimmage
tmuels to 22 for Central
averaging 38 yards on punts
Teachers' 28, and gainiing 113
n passes to their rivals' 102.
as was predicted before yes-
s games the Michigan ,line
ned in a manner that pre-
many gains through that
Michigan's chief weakness
ed to be a defense against
>rt passes that Central State
> great- effect during the sec-
,lf of the first game.
pt for the usual fumbles that
and to crop up in opening
the backfield showed itself
ess more open field running,
tter plunging ability than it
hibited in the past few sea-

n -- - -

VENERATE EMORY
Record of Sir Thomas J. Lipton
Sets All-Time Example in
Sportsmanship

Sportsmen the world over are
mourning the death, two days ago,
of a British Tea merchant, often
characterized as "the world's best
loser." That merchant was Sir
Thomas J. Lipton, five times un-
successful challenger f o r the
America's Cup. Of a fortune made
primarily in the East India trade,
he spent millions of dollars on
craft designed for the purpose of
winning a cup worth, perhaps, five
hundred dollars.
Both his business and sporting
career began at the age of eleven,
when' he began work as a messen-
ger boy, and sailed boats on the
Clyde. After working in this coun-
try, in various capacities, Sir
Thomas returned to Scotland,
where he set ul* a grocery business.
Expanding trade brought him for-
tune, and later, 'his attempt to win
the America's Cup brought him
fame. On his most recent birth-
day, his eighty-first, came his elec-
tion to the exclusive Royal Yacht
Club Squadron, hitherto denied
him because he was engaged in
trade.
The death of the great sports-
man brings recollections of his last
visit to America, in 1931, for the
purpose of challenging for the fifth
time.

Arch
afterni
at thi
organi
ments
man h
-
-I
-

.ery practice will open this
oon in the Yost Field house
ree o'clock. Plans for the
zation of regular tourna-
are under way, Doctor Ly-
as announced.

.,. , .. . . .
... . :.:.

Eyes of thousands of fans will be
on Notre Dame's eleven this year
to see whether or not the spirit of
Rockne is a myth or is afactor
that needed the coach in flesh to
carry it out.

i

THE STORE WITH THE BLACK FRONT

- 332 $. STATE ST.

A

he arrivalof all the-latestf

styles of

- r ismeriw a /
1 BE
lA f/
owl. 73

0
N
S
T
A
T
S
T

EN AVANT aver forward
Burr, Patterson &Auld-Co.
Detrole, Michigan & Walkervile, Ontario
Jor your convenience,
Ann Arbor Store
A A603 Church St
FA NKQ KS aM r

I

'I

BY NE LETON

ors

0.00

*1 ____________..__________

TYPEWRITERS-AU Makes
Bought, Sold, Rented, Exchanged, Cleaned
and Repaired.
PORTABLES-New.Corona, Barr, Underwood,
Noiseless, Royal; Remington.
New L. C. Smith. Large and select stock of sec-
ond-hand typewriters. Low prices. Easy terms.
Service unequalled. The result of twenty-three
years of careful building.
0 .D. MORRILL

WeCarry

a

Complete Stqck

4S

State Street. The Typewriter and Stationery Store
If you write, we have it.

A'

THROW THOSE WHISKERS

\ \ /

F V %

, 1,
t
t

FOR A LOSS

V,

WITH

- Ao
40WAOA&W

M 11

Is

'. ________

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan