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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


"'' OW A University Organist E T L CHAIRMEN CONTEMPORARY PAINTING EXHIBIT TA
ESAF 11'LEAGHes sncWhy Weekly CH ANGE IA EAGE ESHOWS ART ON BACKWARDTREND .r ha9
' EO HGA I ED F Prt~amsSucee ODiversity o f Subjects Features types are represented in the collc-L[
_____ CllecioninYAumn tion. Maurice Sterne has contribut-TOO

EXECUTIYV
ILD MEETI1

Memorial Hall.
An exceptionally fine and inter-
esting exhibit of contemporary
American Painting has been placed
in the West gallery of Alumni
Memorial Hall. This group was ob-
tained mainly for Freshmen week
activities, but will remain in the
Hall until Thursday, October 8. The
College Art Association sponsors
these traveling exhibits which will
be held from time to time through-
out the year in Ann Arbor.
The paintings in the present col-
lection constitute one of the more
modern of the shows circulated this
season. This\group, which, in some
opinions may include some reac-
tionary paintings, is in reality a
sample proof of the fact that art
is on the backward trend toward
that which preceded the presentl
movement,
Among the thirty-five artists rep-
resented in the exhibition now cur-
rent, several have never before
taken part in a group showing. Out-
standing among these are Lloyd R..
Ney, Jacqueline Sissa, Buckley Mac-
Gurrin, and Louis Raynal.
A great diversity of subjects and
Tournament in Minor
SportsWill Be Held
Plans for tournaments in golf,
tennis archery, and riflery are be-
ing made by members of the phys-
ical education department. Further
announcements will be made next
week. All women who are interested
will have an opportunity to sign up.

ea a characteristic ballet sketch to
the show. Jo Rollo is represented
by a sensitive head of a girl. "Grand
Canyon," by Stefan Hirsch is one
of the outstanding pictures of the
group, while "Downtown New York,"
a work by Glenn Coleman is en-
tirely typical. The "Clam Fisher"
by Schattenstein might be consid-
ered in many ways the most strik-
ing picture in the entire collection.
Interclass Managers
Will Report Monday
Managers of all the Interclass
field hockey teams are to report at
the meeting which will be held at
3 o'clock Monday afternoon in the
League building. The meeting is to
discuss plans for the ,annual Play
Day which is held every fall and to
which players from other colleges
are invited.
An honest blush is a straight
flush.-Detroit News.
A powder horn of stag's antler
with elaborate silver-gilt mountings
was made in Nuremburg about 1620.

Names Will Be Considered f
Filling Vacancies
on Board.
To begin officially the activiti
of the Woman's Athletic AssocE
tion, a meeting wil be held ne
Thursday night at 7:30 o'clock. T
place will be announced later.
Besides the regular busines
names will be considered for fili
'vacancies on the executive board.
Members of the executive boa
who are to attend the meeting a
Dorothy Elsworth, '32, presider
Jean Bentley, '33, vice-presiden
Marjorie Hunt, '32, secretary; Agni
Graham, '32, treasurer; Hel
Townsend, '33 Ed; Clara Gra
Peck, '33; Annette Cummings, -'3
Teresa Romani, '33; Betty Gardne
'32Ed; Lenore Caro, '32Ed; Corinr
Fries, '34Ed; Elizabeth Cooper, '3
Jean Porter, '34; Jean Perrin, '3
L y d i a Seymour, '34Ed; Glad
Schroeder, '33; Alendora Gosli
'33; Lorraine Larson, '32; and Sus
Manchester, '32.

Fountain Pens andWriting Material
A large and select assortment of Sheaffer, Parker, Wate
man, Conklin and others $1.00 up. 30% discount o
broken stocks of Wahl, Moore, etc.
0oRALL
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