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January 21, 1932 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-21

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XLII. No. 85 SIX PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1932

PRICE FIVE

Oklahoma's picturesque governor, William H. 'Alfalfa Bill' Murray,
didn't exa ly toss his hat in the presidential ring while in Washington
recently, b t he did outline the platforn on which he believes the Demo-
cratic nominee should stand. He also verbally measured a few of thtt
potential candidates. He is shown here (right) with Rep. Thomas Me-
Keown of Oklahoma. Gov. Murray made the trip primarily to testify.
before a House committee on tax matters.

'OUSLt PROMISES
IMMEI9ATE ACTION
ON TAXICAB RATES
Letter From Dean Jos. Bursley,
Evidence by 'McCormick
Feature Session.
DEAN FAVORS METERS
Owners Declare Rates Suggested
by McCoriuick Unsuitable
for Ann Arbor.
A promise of definite and imme-
diate action on the taxicab situa-
tion was given last night by the
Common council, although no as-
surance wa given of, a result con-
curring with that advoated by
student leaders.
Presentation of a letter from
Dean Joseph A. Bursley, arguing in
favor of meters, and evidence giv-
en in person by Edward J. McCor-
mick, 'Student council president,
regarding comparative rates in oth-
er cities, were the chief events of
the meeting.
The communication from Dean
Bursley reiterated his stand, as ex-
pressed in The Daily Saturday
morning. He argued that meters
are desirable, and that the rates
suggested are fair. "In view of the
chaotic condition existing in con-
nection with this matter at the
present time, an' early settlement
by the Council will be greatly ap-
preciated by all," he said.
The aldermen, while refusing to
set forth their stand definitely,
agreed that permanent settlement
of the problem was desirable, and
expressed their desire to come to
asolution as favorable as possible
1o all concerned.
The list of rates presented by
McCormick, all lower than those in
force in Ann Arbor, aroused an im-
mediate protest from the cab own-
ers present. Some of the -prices
wre ahalexiged i faLse, and the
point was presented that a college
town, with seasonable variations in
trade, must be considered differ-
ently.
Possibility of a compromise bn a
flat rate similar to that now being
charged by taxi companies was sug-
gested by Alderman Lucas.
Worley to Address
DetroitYacht Club
Prof. John S. Worley of the trans-
portation department of the school
of engineering and curator of the
- transportation library will address
members of the Detroit Yacht Club
in Detroit tonight. Professor Wor-
ley will s p e a k concerning the
"Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Water-
way."
This address will be the third one
which Professor Worley has given
during the week.
1AVOIDWET ISSUEI X
'RYS TELL PARTIES
Anti-Saloon League Convention
Names Stand on Liquor
in Platforms.
WASHINGTONJan. 20. - (A) -
The Anti-Saloon league bienfial
convention left behind it today a
warning to the political parties to
steer clear of prohibition this elec-
tion year.
Reiterated by the speakers who
mounted the platform at Tuesday
night's final gathering, this -themet

was summed up in a declaration of I
policy which asserted "repeal or
modification are not for party plat- c
forms or party lines."
With that the veteran dry organ- N
ization went on record as opposing 1
anything that might weaken pro- r
hibition-referendums; . re-submis-
sions, state control, modification 1
and beer proposals, as well as re-
peal attempts. One assertion was:
"Let there be no mistake, Ras-
kobian 'home rule' means eventual-
ly saloon rule."
Among the individual expressions
was the declaration of Mrs. Jesse
W. Nicholson, president of the Na-
tional Women's Democratic Law
Enforcement league:
"If there's jny doubt, let any
party have a wet candidate next
fall and the women will give him
such a licking as he never had."

smites.Mrs. Kooman Boycheff of Toledo,
WASHINGTON, Jan. 20.-.(IP)--O. When a senior she wan the Juil-
liard competitive fellowship in mus-
Proponents of the Bingham 4 per ic, and went to New York to study'
cent beer bill wound up their argu- in September, 1930.
ments today with an announcement It was during the. second sum-'
to church proiibition leaders that er of her work at Camp Carefree on Lake
labor would meet them on the'issue Charlevoix in northern Michigan
and a statement that sentiment in that she was taken ill.
Maine was undergoing a change for Miss Boycheff was a member of
modification. Opponents -will be Sigma Alpha Iota, National musi-
cal sorority, and won distinction in
heard next week. M several of its recitals.J

son Discusses Significance
of Proposed Disarmament Parley

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