100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DATY

PzmAV.

1ibA

Published every morning except Monday during the Univzilty year
by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusivelyentitled4 to the use for-re-
juiblication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
w:edited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
slas matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
Postmaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; br mail, $4. 9
Ofiesa: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
K:Zbigan. Phoiles: Editorial, 4925; Business, 212141
EITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBIN
ty Editor......................................Carl Forsythe
tditorial Director............................... Beach Conger, Jr.
Mews EdiorĀ«.......................... ........David M. Nichol
ports Editor..............................Sheldon 0. Fullerton
Women's Editor...........................Margaret M. Thompson
isistaut News Editor.. .................Robert h. Pierce

A I;. ilibrt-th .
mil A. (bnodnjan
E a ril Ze t

NIGHT EDITO
J. Cullen Kenn

RS
edy James Inglis
Jerry X. osenthal
George A. Stauter
nts
John S. Townsend
Charles A., Sanford

Wihnr J. Myers
'Irluti Joie*
Stanley W. Arnhetm
Lawserfi . Becker
Edword C. Campbell
C. WilJiams Carpenter
Thomas Coenellan

Sports Asslsta
John W. Thomas

REPORTERS
Fred A. Huber
Norman rraft
Roland Martin
henry Meyer
Aljwt II, Newman
R. Jerome Pettit
Georgia Geisman
Alice Gilbert
Martha Littleton
Eliabeth Long
Frances Manchester
Eizabeth Mann

John W. Pritchard
Joseph Renihan
0. Hart Schiaaf
Brackley Shaw
Parker R. Snyder
G. R. Winters
Margaret O'Brien
Hillary IRarden
Jorothy nRundell
Eirna Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhams

ally outfitted than the Maize and,.Blue aggregation,
and their performances are characterized by a care-
less dash that sometimes, even though it suggests
collegiate abandon, looks definitely slip-shod. This
,sort of thing is not appropriate for Michigan, whose
very appearance suggests military precision. And it
is certainly true that whenever a comparison is pos-
sible, as at Princeton last fall, the verdict is always
awarded to the band with snap and training. There-
fore, if Michigan is to maintain its leadership in the
field of carefully trained college bands, I feel that
a reduction in size to 70 men would seriously impair
its performance and, perhaps, completely ruin the
spirit that has lifted it out of high school standards.
I readily sympathize with Mr. Falcone-his job is
a tremendous one-but I feel at the same time that
a compromise with the situation would only pave the
way for the sad downfall of a superior organization.
Gurney Williams, '31.
New York.
The article which appeared in the Campus Opin-
ion department on January 13 prompts me to write
in just defense of the Japanese position in Man-
churia..
Japan's attitude in the present Manchurian trou-
bles is being badly misunderstood by the United
States and especially by the League of Nations, but
when all the facts in the present case are brought to
the light, Japan will have the support of the world.
The misunderstood state of Japan in Manchuria
is due to the sentimental appeal and propaganda to
the world, since the beginning of the present troubles,
by the Young, Chinese leaders, most of whom have
been educated in the universities of this country or
other foreign countries, and do not have a real un-
derstanding of the fundamental questions of their
own country. These Chinese leaders, unlike most of
the Japanese leaders, have a good knowledge of Eng-
lish and are able to spread a lot of misinformation
to the outside world, and get by with it.
These men show China to the world as if she were
under ideal conditions, but those who know the facts
are convinced that it is nothing but propaganda to
win the sympathy of the world against her neighbor,
Japan. Japan has been accused of exploiting Man-
churia, but careful observers of conditions there all
agree that it was the Chinese warlords themselves
who have been exploiting Manchuria and sapping the
life from its peaceful residents. Japan, on the other
hand, has done a great deal to develop the natural
resources of that territory and to establish peaceful
communities.
Until stable government can be established in
Manchuria or the Nanking government can guaran-
tee to bring about a more settled state in North
China, Japan's activities in Manchuria are justifi-
able; Japan has to protect her subjects and property.
T. Miwa.

-

Michigan has a "handy man,"
At least one would so judge tc
read the little item on page 71 of
the Student Directory, where the
official titles and activities of Dean
Edward Henry Kraus are enumer-
ated. "Professor of Crystallography
and Mineralogy, Director of the
Mineralogical Laboratory, Dean of
the College of Pharmacy, and Dean
of the Summer Session," the Direc-
tory states.
The Directory, in this instance at
least, is correct. Dean Kraus does
occupy, and has occupied fox some
time, all these positions.
Readers of his most famous book
on gems and gem materials prob-
ably do not know him as an admin-
istrative official; summer school
students undoubtedly are not ac-
quainted with his proficiency in the
art of collecting gems. But the Uni-
versity long ago recognized his abil-
ities in both fields.
Dean Kraus received three of his
college degrees from Syracuse Uni-
versity, in the city where he was
born, back in 1875. Later he earned
his Ph.D. in Munich.
His first work as a teacher was
done at his Alma Mater, where he
became a professor in mineralogy,
and later in geology and chemistry.

Edward H. Kraus
(Editor's note: This is the eighth
of a series of articles on outstand-
ing members of the University fac-
ulty. Another will appear in this
column each week.)
By E. Jerome Pettit

}
i

r

1

AFTER THE
DANCE TO-
NIGHT OR TO-
M O R R O W
NIGHT TRY
PREKETES
SUGAR BOWL
FOR DELICIOUS
SALADS AND
T OAS TED
SANDWICHES.

i

i

Active

Bodies Need

Added Nourishment

DUKE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
DURHAM, N. C.
Applications for admission to the
first and third year medical classes
entering October 1, 1932, should be
sent as soon as possible, and will be
consideered in the order of receipt.
The entrance qualifications are intel-
ligence, character, two years of col-
lege work and the requirements for
grade A medical schools. Catalogues
and application forms may -be ob-
tained from the Dean.

r.
i
I

-

Serve

'7

,,
i

All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium unless otherwise noted.
The afternoon concerts are given
witho::t admission charge.
ARTHUR POISTER. Guest Or-
ganist, January 20, 4:15.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, January 24,
4:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Dr. Rudolf Siegel,
Guest Conductor, January 25,
8:15.
DR. SIGFRIDsKARG-ELERT,
Guest Organist, January 27,
4:15.
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Pianist,
January 31, 4:15.
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist,
February 4, 8:15.
THELMA LEWIS, Soprano, Feb-
ruary 14, 4:15, Mendelssohn
Theatre.
WARREN ALLEN, Guest Organ-
ist, February 10, 4:15.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Hanns Pick, Violoncellist, Was-
sily Besekirsky, Violinist, Joseph
Brinkman, Pianist, February 7,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
PERCY GRAINGER, Pianist,
February 19, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Vio-
linist, MABEL ROSS RHEAD,
Pianist, in Sonata Recital, Feb-
ruary 21, 4:15, Wendelssohn
Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N'Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
tern, Conductor, February 25,
4:15.

-.

.

MUSICAL
EVENTS

rothy Brockman
riam Carver
atrice Coalins
uise Crandall
ie Feldman
idence Foster

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

Ann Arlbor
Dairy
Milk
Not only is it, pure and

CHARLES T. Kline
NORRIS P. JOHNSON

. .. ... .... .. Business Manager
.....................Assistant Manager
Department Managers

dvertising...... .............................Vernon Bishop
dve rtisng Contrrcis........................... Iarry,,It. Begley
dvertisin Scrvic............... .... ..yron C. Vedder
ublications ...................W iliam 'P. Brown
coents......................................Richard .trtemeir
romen's Bus!iness Manager .. ................Ant W. Verner

viix Aronson
Bert K. horde.y
en Clark
ert Finn
mna Becker
rtha Jane Glaerl
evieve Field
xine Fiechgrund
y Oallineyer
ry Harriman

Assistants
Jonhn viySer
Arthur F. Kobe
James Lowe
Arnie iarasha
a tha rine Jackson
Dorothy Layin
Virginia Mecomb
Catrolin Mosher
l'ui Olscr

Crafton W. Sharp
Don>toA. .ohnton ii11
Don Lyon
Bernard H. Good
Ma.y Seefried.
Minnie Seng,
helen Spence
Kathryn Stork
Clare Unger
Mary Elizabeth Watt&

NIGHT EDITOR-JERRY E. ROSENTHAL
FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1932
F rosh, Pots
and Fraternities
W E are continually hearing complaints about
deferred rushing. Rumors of violations of
the rules are prevalent and vary from accusations
of pocket pledging to that of establishing special
rooming houses for prospective pledges. Houses
are continually complaining of added running ex-
pense per member caused by small chapters and
rushing entertainment.
A new complaint against the present system
was brought up at the last meeting of the Inter-,
fraternity Council. Freshmen, it was said, have;
no respect for campus traditions, and seem pround
to flaunt this fact in the faces of all upperclassmen.'
Prospective pledges arrive at fraternities often
with derby hats instead of "pots". The fraternity
men, most of whom are scared to death that they
will not get a large freshman class, do not remind
the first year men that there is a campus tradition
to the effect that freshmen should wear this mark
of their class. Instead, they treat their rushees as
though they were Gods. The outcome seems to
be, that after almost four months of this sort of
treatment, the freshmen themselves have almost
become convinced that they are Gods. They feel
prfectly at liberty to break engagements with fra-.
ternities and to come late to those that they keep.
Several of them have decided that they will go to,
the Wednesday night dinners ,because it is a
chance for a free meal but leave early because they,
have made up their minds that they will remain,
independents
Individually, the fraternities are afraid to act-
in any way to dispell this "cocky" attitude of the
first year men because they know that by so doing
they may cut their own throats. Collectively, fra-*
ternities have rebelled against this attitude suffi-
ciently to pass a resolution urging the freshmen
to wear their "pots", which as former resolutions
have shown will have no effect on the first year
men.
As one man at the Interfraternity Council put
it, "the only consolation will be to pledge some
freshmen and then paddle it out of them." We
wonder though if the individual fraternities will
regain their self-respect to a sufficient degree to
lay down any rules for freshmen. Perhaps they
will be afraid that unless their pledges approve of
the rules they will turn in their buttons. Perhaps
we will.see the seniors in fraternities taking the
freshmen's laundry bags down to the post office.
Perhaps we shall rename "hell-week", "heaven-
week."

Executive
for College Men
Prepare yourself for asuccessful career
in business. Avoid the wastod years of
trainingin the "school of hard knocks".
Babson Institute offers a nine months'
residential course in executive training
that gives you the fundamentals of
business and actual experience in their
practical application.
Students are in a commercial cnvironment and
under the direction of business men. They keep
regular office hours and have frequent contact
with actual business organizations. You will ap-
proach "your first job" with the confidence born
of experience, ready for rapid progress.
Next Term Begins March 26th
Mail Coupon for Booklet
Our booklet, "Training torBusiness Leadership".
gives full information about this unique corse
of business training. Sent without obligation.
Simply mail the coupon below.
BABSON
I NSTITUTE
g Div. L318 Babson Park, Mass. E
*Send me, without oblgation, "Training
*for Business Leadership" and complete w
particulars about Babson Institute.
Name
d College
N Address
S-------------------------
';
--------- ----------------------------3
*Home
* Address------------ -- -- - .-
* City -State
mm mmm - m m---- m- mtatem

4

*1LCAA Ltii~c9 , LuI Ii aujuJOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
has the gdded zestful ap--Febrauary 28, 4:15.
CHARLOTTE LOCKWOOD,
peal of wh o e s o m e Guest Organist, Ma'rch 2, 4:15.
chocolate. Just phone LOUISE CUYLER, Violinist, and
MAUD OKKELBERG, Pianist,
4101. Our deliveryman in Sonata Recital, March 6,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
will start leaving a supply ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano,
March 7, 8:15.
at your' home tomorrow.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
and HANNS PICK, Violon-
cellist, 'n Sonata Recital, March
13, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, David E. Mat-
A tern; Conductor, and HANNS
PICK, Violoncellist, April 3,
JII~ iry ~4:15
D aWry C o NELL B. STOCKWELL, Pianist,
April 24, 4:15, Mendelssohn
The Home of Pure Milk Theatre.
PALMER CHRISTIAN , in Organ
Recital,' every Wednesday, at
Phone 4101 4:15 unless otherwisenannoun-
ced.
SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

To The Editor:

On numerous occasions I have observed with some
amusement certain protests which have appeared in
this column and elsewhere from people who object
to occasional over-subtleties in subjective interpreta-
tion appearing in the reviews of our musical critics.
It occurs to me that perhaps I might provide comfort
for the critics as well as possible amusement for your
readers in general by opening a perspective of such
complaints which extends back now about twenty-,
two hundred years.
There was discovered in Egypt about twenty-five
years ago a papyrus fragment which with minor
changes might appear in the Daily on the second day,
after any concert in Hill Auditorium. Since it is pub-
lished in a rather inaccessible source, to which, how-
ever, I shall be glad to refer anyone on request, I am
presenting my own translation which is as literal as
the divergent colloquialism of Greek and English
permits.
"Gentlemen, I have often come to wonder how
certain people get away with it, who offer reviews of
accomplishments quite foreign to their specialties.
They claim they are musical and so they pick out
and compare certain renditions, indiscriminately
panning some of them, and boosting others at ran-
dom. They admit that they personally ought not
to be regarded as instrumentalists or singers, for in
these matters they yield to others, while their own
field is purely theoretical. Yet in these very matters
which they yield to others, they are apparently en-
thusiasts in no small way, while in those in which
they claim special proficiency theystalk like fools .. .
To such a point of bumptiusness they go that they
spend their lives on the strings, twanging the harp
worse than the professionals, singing worse than the
singers, reviewing worse than a soap-box orator, in
short doing everything worse than anybody else.
Why, even in their so-called harmonic subtleties, in
which they claim a certain sensitivity, they have no
articulate mode of expression, but they go into ecsta-
sies, and thump out the time on the bench under
them in defiance of the rhythm while the playing is
going on, and even have the nerve to say that certain
compositions have 'an undefinable affinity to the
grace of the laurel, or again of the ivy.' And they
ask whether you don't think that these 'affinities' are
not admired advisedly."..
After this blast from the third century before
Christ, I think our friends of the Music and Drama
column may bear with equanimity the comparatively
gentle reproofs of the twentieth century A. D.
Yours sincerely,
Warren E. Blake.
C AEEN ITEFLECIMINH G
AT THE MICHIGAN

Dean Kraus.
He also headed the department of
science of Central High School in
Syracuse for two yesars.
Then, in 1904, he came to Michi-
gan as an assistant professor of

mineralogy, holding that position I
for two years, becoming a junior l
professor in 1906. A year later he
also taught petrography (the de-
scription and systematic classifica-
tion of rocks) and then, in 1908, he
became professor of mineralogy
and Director of the Mineralogical
Laboratory. In the same year he
also became secretary of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy.
For a few years the mineralogy
professor's life went along very
smoothly, and he had spare time
in which to run around the coun-
try looking for precious stones.
Then, between the regime of Dr.
Hutchins and that of Dr. Burton
as pregident of the University, Pro-
fessor Kraus was temporarily given.
the deanship of the College of
Pharmacy.4
Either because he filled the posi-
tion so ably that no one could be
found to supplant him, or because
he filled it so ably the administra-
tion refused to look further for
anyone else, he has retained the
position since that time. We sus-
pect the administration of both in-
dictments-things can always be
found to keep men like Dean Kraus
busy.
Before that time, he had already
been named. Dean of the Summer
Session. He took it some twenty
years ago when the enrollment was
less than 1,500 students-last sum-
mer more than 4,500 persons were
attracted to the school.
He has always liked to take
jaunts in quest of elusive gems,
mineralogical d e p osi t s,ornew
trends in educational systems.
In 1926 he visited representative
German universities, according to a
Daily dispatch of that year. In-
specting laboratories and labora-
tory methods occupied most of his
time on that particular trip. Of
course, as usual, he did make a
few side trips to observe summer
study on the American plan, or to
interview students in the colleges
and universities visited.
The famous deposits of potash
salts near Berlin-with three hours
underground at the mine-and the

h4

Milestone f rgrs
C IVILIZATION, developed the Cler-
mont, and in due course of time, the
giant Leviathan, on which is published a
daily newspaper for trans-Atlantic passen-
gers. Today we have also the aeroplane,
which carries the printed word from Coast
to Coast in three days. In truth, these are
milestones of progress.
Another milestone of progress is the
great news-gathering system developed by
the Associated Press. Imagaine the dull-
ness of a day without the latest news! News
of the world is served to you constantly by
The Assocjated re ss
Whose Drma~thhsAnn-nr i

i

CAMPUS OPINIION

ii.ders puhilished in this column should not be construed as
expressing the editorial opinion of The Daily. Anonymous coam-
nunications will b; disregarded. The names of conumnicants
will, however. he rearted as couli utial uPrn reqnest. outrib-
'00r; are atsked totbe brie'f, cui;'anu themtselres to less thtan 300
words ii possibite.
To The Editor:
I've been following the big-or-little band discus-
sion since its inception in The Daily and have reach-
ed the point where I should like to put in an oar and
do a little pulling for the band
As a spectator at the Michigan-Princeton game
last October (in the Princeton stands) I was duly

Ordinarily we don't think much of theatre adver-
tisements. Somehow they are prone to be-just a
leetle bit-overdrawn; and sometimes they even run
off into expressions like "stupendous" and "gigantic."
In advertising "The Guardsman," with Alfred Lunt
and Lynn Fontanne, the management of the Michi-
gan says, "If you don't see another picture-ever-
you must see "The Guardsman."
And that's about all there is to say about'it, ex-
cept to repeat that Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne
are in it. For sheer farce comedy, elegant and
sophisticated, of the highest type "The Guardsman"
h' hkonan nnrnn nhaAnn 1r,'nnfp na 4,, m, o.thatn +in

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan