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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1932 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I.

THE MICHIGAN DATEV

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ST TRYOUTS fOR YOUNG PEOPLEAX
TO CONVENTIONS
Mar jorie Oclrichs Says College
'1, lit L. 0 IU.lI Men Respect Tradit;ons
of Chaperone.
"Young people today are as anx-
ious as anybody to conform to the
3l Chorus Tryouts Scheduled rules observed by all well-'bred peo-
ple," asserts Marjorie Oelrichs aj
for Saturday Afternoon leader of New York's younger set.
at One o'Clock; In this article on "Manners for
Moderns" appearing in a recent is-
NG, DANCE REQUIRED) re of McCall', magazine, she sets
_______down the inviolable rule that a
young lady from Vassar College,
men Unable to Be Present at for example, who attends a prom at
First Tryout Should See a men's college, must be accom-
Miss Brazier Today. panied by a chaperon on the trip
_____. 'ut not necessarily to the scene
youts for lead parts in the 1932 the, festivities.
:or Girls' Play will be held at "Most college men take the mat-
clock today in the committee ter of the chaperon very 1seriously,
n of the League building. Cards and are the first to criticize a girl
e been sent to those women who who goes about to college affairs
to come at this time. unchaperoned," Miss O e 1 r i c h s
nal tryouts for lead parts will points out.
place Friday. Tryouts for Finally, but not least in import-
uses will be held at 1 o'clock ance, is the rule about college and
irday. It is expected that mem- school entertaining that the person
of the cast and choruses will who does the inviting makes all
nade known some time next --

to

bei
be
we(

n0,
sh
re

ere are any women who were
le to attend first tryouts they
see Miss Harriet Brazier, di-
today some time .before 4
and they will have a hear-

ing-
According to Miss Brazier, all
those who received cards for lead
tryouts are assured of some part
In the play as those who are elim-
inated from leads will have first
choice for the choruses. The cast
this year is about the largest that
has ever been had for a Junior
Girls' Play. There are eleven leads,
everal inmor roles, and about 88'
parts in choruses. Because of this'
large number there will be places
for a good many. whostried out.
The nature of the tryout this af-
ternoon will be like that of a read-
ing group. All those in line for one
part will stand around in a group'
and read lines from the play. A
song will probably be required and
possibly a dance.
HOLLYWOOD GOES
TO PUPPET PLAYS
Signatures of Stars Appear 'on
Walls' of Tiny Theatre.
HOLLYWOOD, J a n. 13.-(/P)--
When Greta Garbo goes to the pup-
pet shows, in a tiny little theatre
in the Los Angeles Mexican quarter,
she. usually is attired in a blue suit
and blue beret andbholds her head
down, trying her best not to be
seen.
When Gloria Swanson was invit-
ecl to bring her litle daughter to
a matinee to see the puppet circus,
she said: "Oh, my child would be
much too sophisticated for the chil-
dren's play-mayn't I bring her in
the evening?" (Tiny Gloria is about
11.)
The puppet shows, staged by a
quintet bearing the aliterative
names of Burnett, Brown, Bromley,
Brandon and Brant, known as the
Yale Puppetters, are an attraction'
that almost every movie personage
has visited.
The walls of the 80-seat theatre
are covered with signatures, inl
white paint, of score after score of
cinema great. Don Herold, how-
ever, wrote the most amusing note
"I always thought a puppet was the
noise motorcycles make."

Miss Lloyd Discusses
Mari of Glee Clubs
to Give obin Hood
"I am extremely pleased to see
campus organizations interested inI
producing a light opera," said Miss
Alice Lloyd, Dean of Women, in
commenting on "Robin Hood," theI
production to be presented during
March under the auspices of the
three campus glee clubs, Mimes,
Play Production, and the University
Symphony orchestra.
Miss Lloyd is a patroness of the
University Girls' Glee Club and has
been interested in the work of that
organization. She has hoped for
some time that it would take part
in an entertainment of this kind.
"I consider "Robin Hood" an ex-
cellent choice for the first produc-
tion," she obs~rved, "and hope that
the opera will become an annual
event."
As. a student in the University
.Miss Lloyd took work in vocal train-
ing at the School of Music and is
now studying voice under Professor
Arthur Hackett. She is particularly
intere sted in group singing.
"I am fond of all musical enter-
tainment, but especially of light
opera," said Miss Lloyd. Gilbert-
Sullivan operas are her favorites,
and she particularly enjoys "Pirates
of Penzance" and "Iolanthe." "I
shall never be happy," ,she laughed,
"until this campus has produced a
Gilbert-Sullivan opera.'"
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.-(P)-The
latest color to make its debut in the
fashion world is "Smoke". The new!
color, a dark rich grey, is used for
coats, ensembles and dresses in
both wool and silk.
One of the smartest gowns in the
new shade is a cocktail frock made
of chiffon, designed with swooping
sleeves banded tightly at the wrists
and richly embroidered in cut steel
beads.

IOfJS TO CONFORM
OF THE WELL-BRED
the arrangements and pays all the
bills for the guests-except the
traveling expenses.
It is not the judgment of their
elders that non-conformists fearr
most, she concludes, but the risk of
being snubbed by the members of
their set and labeled as "not run-
ning true to form."
Practice Debates Point Towards
Northwestern-Michigan
Contest.
Albion College will furnish the
debating team which will oppose
the women's varsity negative team
this afternoon on the question of
independence for India.
This debate is at Albion. The
members of the University team
are: Dorothy Daniels, '32, Gladys
Baker, '33, and Jean Hagaman, '33.
This is the team which will oppose
Indiana University later in the sea-
son at Bloomington, Indiana.
The team which is to meet North-
western University in a varsity de-
bate at Ann Arbor is discussing the
affirmative side of the question and
has as members: Alice Schleh, '32,
Maxine Gilmore, '33, and Dorothy
Davis, '33.
This group met a team, from De-
troit City College at Detroit on
Tuesday afternoon. The affirmative,
represented by the University,
stressed the fact that England's
policy in India was probably very
good but when it was put into prac-
tice it had been to the disadvant-
age of India as she had not been
treated fairly in recent years. The
affirmative also contended that
India was ready for independence
and that self-government would be
the only thing which would quiet
the unrest there at the present
time.
The main contention of the nega-
tive was that India was not pre-
pared to take over her own govern
ment as she did not have stability
or capable leaders.
Cancellation of the inter-allied
war debts including reparations will
be ' the topic to be discussed by a
negative team from Ann Arbor op-
posing Adrian College on Friday
afternoon in the Athena room of
Angell Hall.' The members of this
team are: Lois Benson, '32, Frances
Johnson, '33, and Alice Gilbert, '33.
Lis Benso, '32, has been named.
by Mr. Floyd K. Riley, coach, as the
third member ofrthe team whichi
will oppose the University of Cin-
cinnati in February on the question
of India. T e other women to de-
bate are: lelen Haapamaki, ',32,
and Alice Gilbert, '33.
If youwrite. we a*e it.
Corresond4nce Stationery
Fouintain Pens, Ink, etc.
Typemriters ell akes.
OTeeting Cards for e x r.
0. D. M 0 R R;_ L

FACULTY CENSORS
SCRE BY WOMEN dU
Delegates to Conference Appeal
for Support Against
Interference.
That women's colleges also feel
faculty censorship of editorial,
news, and business policies of their
newspapers to be an intrusion was
shown when eleven of the most
prominent eastern schools took up
the issue at a recent conference
held at Pembroke college, Brown
university.
Hunter, Barnard, Vassar, Bryn
Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Connecticut
College for W o m e n, Goucher,
Wheaton, Wilson, and Pembroke
were represented, and Hunter col-
lege in particular made an appeal
for the support of the other choolsI
in its fight against administrative
interference.
While no marked degrees of cen-
sorship was reported by most of the
schools, several declared that the
authorities had refused to lift the
ban on cigarette advertising, cut-
ting off a considerable source of
revenue.
The Hunter delegation declared
they would open their fight against
the administration censorship im-
mediately, with the support of the
other members of the conference.
Music Sorority Holds
Party at League Cave
Actives, alumnae and patronesses
of Delta Omicron, national music
sorority, were guests at a hard
times party Monday night, in the
cave of the League building. Mrs.
R. C. Hussey,'Miss Louise Cuyler,
and Miss Sproat were hostesses. Re-
freshments were served at the end
of the evening.,
Dance Frocks Admired
PARIS, Jan. 13. - (A'} - Lattice
dance frocks are the latest addi-
tion to the debutante's evening
wardrobe. They are made of pale
blue, shell pink or sea green taffeta
and chiff'on, with the taffeta form-
ing the lower part of the full skirt
and the chiffon the upper section.
Taffeta flowers are appliqued on
the chiffon portions of the gown in
lattice design, the whole creating
an airy effect when the dancer
moves across the floor.

Chi Omega
Chi Omega entertained three
guests at a rushing dinner Wednes-
day night. Flowers and tapers were
used as decorations. The sorority
will hold an informal dance Satur-
day night, at which Professor and
Mrs Stockard, and MrsBlanche
harley will act as chaperones. Mrs.
Harley will also pour at an informal
tea to be held Sunday in honor of
out of town guests.
Sorosis
Collegiate Sorosis will honor Mr.
and Mrs. Benjamin Merrit, Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Sellersf Mr. and Mrs.
Howard M. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. Al-
fred H. Stockard, Mr. and Mrs. Julio
del Toro, and Dr. and Mrs. Harold
McCluskey at a formal faculty din-
ner Thursdiay night.
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Kappa Kappa Gamma announces
the pledging of Miss Ruth Duhme,
'34, of Webster Grove, Missouri,
which took place Monday evening
at 5 o'clock in the chapter house. A
dinner honoring the new pledge
was given following the ceremony.
Members of the Detroit Alumnae
Board, who were guests at the din-
ner, included: Mrs. Condit and Mrs.
Smith of Detroit; and Mrs. John
Bradfield and Mrs. William Walz
of Ann Arbor. Garden flowers form-
ed the chief decoration for the
prettily appointed dinner.
Alumnae House
Miss Mary Fairman Power of De-
troit and Mrs. Ralph Loveland of
Ann Arbor were the guests of Miss
Edith A. Barnard, social director of
Alumnae House, at luncheon on
Wednesday.
The Board of Governors of Alum-
nae House will be the guests of the
H wATS
89C
During our _finalclear-
Cane this week-end.
I Jacobsons

buffet luncheon Saturday noon.
A The local member$ of the Board}
are Miss Alice Lloyd, Dean of Wo-j
men, and Mrs. Hugh Keeler. Mrs.
Joseph Marpley is an honorary life
member. Other members of the
Board represent organized groups
of alumnae in a number of Michi-
gan, cities. These members are Miss
Edith Kimball of Detroit; Mrs. Lee
White of Birmingham; Mrs. Edgar
Cooley of Lansing; Miss Nellie
Hayes of Grand Rapids; Mrs. Fred
Culoer of Saginaw, afid Mrs. Frede
erick Morgan of Detroit, who is the
chairman of the Board.
Mosher Jordan
This afternoon the residents of
Jordan Hall are entertaining at one
of the series of regular weekly
Mosher-Jordan teas.
Mrs. Morris P. Tilley and Royena
Hornbeck, graduate resident of the
hall, will pour. Lillian Masin, '32,1
will be the student hostess in at-
tendance.
The women who will assist in
serving at the tea are Mary Reif,
'32, Betty Uttdr, '32. Alma Wads-
worth, '34, Margaret Cooper, '35,
Jane Brydges, '34, Betty Osgood,
'32, Vera Louise Krieghoff, '35, Anna
Jane Chamberlain, '35, Rebecca
Pruett, '33, Charlotte Strassner, '33,
and Carolyn Hankey, '34.

residents of the dormitory at

F SOCIETY¬ę

a

TO DEBATE[ -GRADE
Alpha Nu and Zeta Phi Eta W
Meet in Traditional
Competition.
Continuing a rivalry which
traditional a debating team rep
senting Zeta Phi Eta, wom
speech sorority will oppose Alp:
Nu mens speech group tonight
the Alpha Nu room of Angell h:
on the question that: Resolb
that co-eds receive their gra'
for other than scholastic achie'
ment.
Not trusting to an audience c
cision to determine which te
wins, these two societies have chc
en judges taken from represent
tive campus activities. Beach Co
ger, '32, will act for the Michig
Daily, Edward McCormick, '32,
the Student Council and Kather
Koch, '32, for the Women's Leag
Last year's debate, in which
question of whether co-eds act i
human beings, was discussed v
won by Alpha Nu.
The women debating for Z
Phi Eta are: Dorothy Davis,
Alice Schleh, '32, and Mary Pr
'35. Both Miss Schleh and M9
-Davis are members of the wome:
varsity debate teams.
The challenge for the discuss
was issued by Alpha Nu.

This Season of

Formals

Lead By the J-Hop

Requires

Jewelry for Formal Wear.
W
We invite you to view our selection

of Pearl

and Rhinestone

Articles.

'

---

ARCADE
JEWELRY SHOP

_ __ _

CARL

F. BAY

r o r arns-

16 N I C KELS

ARCADE

for your dances
for your banquets

f;

FL ORSHE

I

N4 . Ste St., Ann Arbor.

You will soon be needing prograins for your dances and
banquets. Let us know your needs. We have all necessary
equipment for meeting your needs. We do embossing as
well as printing.

III

From Nature's under-ground storage-
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER
Pure, coo! and refreshing-bottled in our modern botteng
plant-ready for delivery to your refrigerator. Order a case
today. You'll note the difference immediately.
Delivered to your home in case lots of 6 2-quart bottles.
We can also supply you with chemically pure distilled water.
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER

Study Room Supplies

Procure your Cut Flowers
and Plants from the
University Flower
Shop
606 E. Liberty St. Phone 9053
Theyrgrow their own here in,
Ann Arbor.
Their Floral Designs are dis-
tinctive and beautiful.
As a member of the Telegraph
Delivery Association they can
have flowers delivered anywhere
at any time.
Postal Telegraph office in
store.

r!

Everything to help in your stuidy work:
Desk Blotters Fot
Desk Sets Ring
Note Books Rule
etc.

intain Pens
g Binders
ers

Most $10.00 and $11.00 Styles Now
4/

416 West Huron

Phone 8270
W-.- - - -I

The AYER-SCHAIRER CO
Printers, Stationers, Binders, Oflice Outfitters

I

LOESRRIE

112 South Main Street

Ann Arbor

l

Ii'

ly

Group Specials -

Ind viuality
Your personality is en-
hanced by choosing hats
individual to your re-
quirements.

BIN

Vahies to $7.00
300 Pairs
Many Jacqueline Modes

-for remainder of

For A
Short Time
Only

week

Smart Dresses

Gloves

In this mixed group of dresses
are wools, crepe de chines, flat
crepes . all late arrivals and
consequently the newer styles are
presented. They formerly sold
from $11.95 to $16.75, now...

These gloves which originally
sold for x$3.95 come in black,
brown, and gray. Most of them
are slip-overs but there are a few
with fancy cuffs - . - and here's
a tip - .- fancy cuffs will be good
for Spring.

1

ALL SIZES

HATS

WINTER SHOES
at a sensational low price

$595

250 Pairs, Special!
Styhs $11.00 and.
$12.00 Values.
$885

150 Pairs
Broken Lots
Closing Out at
$685

Cut to your individual
taste.

L

NOW

95

1 '

One-Half Price Specials

ALL OTHER MAKES REDUCED TC

I I ~ i

11

II

1111 1 I'l

Jil

i

i _ il

fill

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