100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/.

THS NtICHJTAN DAIEY4

THURSDAY; .JAI

_ _ _ _

0

5crimm age

Features

Preparations

for

Badgers

Back in Form
Both Good and Bad Play Evident!
in Long Session With
Freshmen..

, With the first Conference game
of the season only two days away,'
Coach "Cappy" Cappon yesterday
put his Varsity cagers through a
long, hard'scrimmage session in anj
attempt to polish up the offensive
machinery of his charges. Two
different freshman teans provided
the opposition.
Varsity Plays Good And Bad.
The session made two things
clearly evident. First, that the Wol-
erines are - capable of some really
good basketball,' and second, that
they are also capable of some veryI
ragged play. At the. end of the first;
half the scor e.
stood 19-7, which
represented same
v e r y creditable'
floor work. How-
ever, the :second
half was a much
different., s t or y.
For the greater
part of the per-
lo d-,t he fi r st
s t r i n g e rs were
unable to s o're
while the year-
OR.WALTER MEANWEpicked up
considerably.
Eveland and Petrie were the first
to break the ice for the Varsity in
this period, looping two "long toms"
through the hoops. Daniels also
managed to cake two pretty one
armed tosses before Cappon re-
M~oved his i-egulars' in favor, of a
substitute team. At- the end of the
contest the score stood 30-16.
Lineup Practically Set.
- The lineup which will. start
against Wisconsin is practically set
with. Eveland and Petrie scheduled
to start at forwards, Daniels at
center, and Williamson and Weiss
at the guards. -However, there-
seems. to. be a good chahce that
Garner, lanky center, will break
into the lineup if Daniels is unable
to hold: his own on the tip-off.
Cappon is not greatly discourag-
ed about the loss of the game- to
Syracuse last week, inasmuch as
the Easterners play an entirely dif
ferent type of gamiethan that play-
ed in thie Big Ten. Most Confer-
ence schools play a blocking type
of game, but when the Wolverines
started this at Syracuse they were
promptly checked by the officials.
Eastern' officials permit more hold-'
ing and, use of the arms, but bkock-
ing is taboo.
Wisconsin, by virtue of their.
strong showing against Northwest-
ern last: week-end, loom as a strong
obstacle for thel Wolverines to hur-
dle in their opening Big Ten eni-
counter -Meanwell's attack, feats:
uring the short pass, may cause
the Wolverines unexpected, trouble.
inasmuch as the Badgers have an
extraordinary amount of height
with which to work.

'P UCK D IL I N'DS,
Rapid Development and Steady
Work Summarizes Career
on 'Varsity Squad.
Riaiold Sindles starred a ainstthe
Freshmen last night for CoachI
Lowery's Varsity hockiey team. His
rapid development in the last two
weeks has broPilht him 4to reach1
of the right wing starting position,f
now held by Joe Frumkcs.1
Harold bats the puck into the netl
from the left hand side and this
handicaps him for the right side of!
the forward wall. If he was' able
to shoot from the right side as well
as he has been doing from the port
side, he would be the starting wing-
man by now. .
Frumkes Missing. .
Frumkes failed to return for the
vacation practices, that started be-
fore New Year's Day and conse-
quently he lost out with the start-
p ing assignment against the On-
tario Aggies. Bythe end of the
week Coach Lowrey expects him to
be back in his best form.-
Sindles got the call against the
Aggies and surpiised the Wolverine
fans of the fastest sport-th a
steady performance. He is not as
fast on his -skates as Frumkes- but
has the advantage of steady, con-
servative play..
Yearlings Limited...
Only about seven yearlings have
shown enough hockey ability to be
match with the Varsity. This team
was used last night but Reid, Cross-
man, arid Co. scored nearly at will
over them. Michigan's passing at-
tack was given a thorough goingt
over in the practice [and towardsI
the end of the scrimmage session,I
Reid .and Crossman produced thel
best teamwork in evading the year-i
ling defense seen at the Coliseum]
this year.

Purdue Cagers Look
Best in Conference
Boilermakers Impress Foes in
49-30 Victory .Over

Strong Indiana Five.-I' Wolvcrine Entries in 135 and
By Sheldon 'C. Fuerton 145-Pound Weights Still.
Once again nine Western Confer- kBe Picked.
ence quintets will be forced to di-
rect their efforts to keeping a Pur- Michigan's Varsity grapplers are
due basketball team from marching putting on the finishing touches
to a Big Ten title, if early season these last few days before the open-
showings are to be any criterion ing encounter .of the new year this
of the Boilermaker's play through- Saturday night with the University
cut the present cage campaign. Theo.' Fd u
m anne' in which Coach Ward Lam- of Toronto i Yost Field house.
bert's team marched through tielr Coach Cliff KVeen has just about
practice games was Jipressive, but decided on the Wolverine enfriesf
it was no; until Purdue humbled for the inaugural match, with only
Indiana, 4930, that the rest of the the 135 and 145-pound division en-
.o'fertnce -r eally trants yet to be determined. Otto
sat up nd oi ol and Helliwell are still battling for
notice. the .honor of carryin?; the Maize
and Blue hopes at 135 pounds,.
Lt. for the third while either Thomas or Williams
5strai h season~ will get the call for.the 145-pound
' by that Ibrilliant bout.
gzard and oor .t 118 poumds Michigan will be
: a ', 3 o h n n y represented by the champion of
Wko en;lthe Ioil- that . division in tihe University
er-aers h a ve bouts, Texiera. Wrestling in the,
ste-p1d out as tie 126-pound class will be Aldinger,
early eas el,-ia Vetetan of two seasons ag .
crites to annex Mosier is slated to uliold the
itha ie e r o w n that honor of .'the Wolverine matmen
l. aken Y y at 155 pounds, while Wilson will be
Northwestern last year.:Not that entered at^165.'The veterans Reif
the Wildcats have failed to im- and Stoddard will meet the Cana-
press in their practice clashes, diafr grappiers- In the 175 and
but the. manner in which. the heavyweightbouts respectively.
Boilermakers have disposed ofI The;-' Wolverine mat mentor is
eir- opposition to indicates 4lhat faced with the problem of having
he' Purdue team will be one of the bulk of his material in a few
the strongest that has represent- -_dvisions.
ed a Conference school in several The Yale bowl, footbaltrophy ii
years. St. Louis high school :comntition
.Wooden nfor 1-6 years, has been permanently
notd the onlyhman on awarded to Roosevelt high.
the Purdue regular five that must ,.

MAiTMEN TO MEET'
TORON TOSATURDAY'

NEW WISCONSIN ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
TO AIM FOR HIGH SPORT STANDARD
Irwin Uteritz, Former Michigan Regents but this formal approval
Star, Is Very Popular With was- anticipated a.s a -matter 44
course. Uteritz will assume the duty
Badger Students. ies of director, July 1.
('>'pc'uto Th1 rThe new'head of Wiscnsin.atl
MADISON, Wis., Jan. 6.-"Na- letics is 32 years old. He was borQl
turally, I appreciate deeply thein Oak Park, Il where he co=
thepleted his. high sc-hool courseil
honor which the athletic council 1918. He immediately enlistect 1
has conferred upon me in recom- the army and was assigned to tl
mending me for the position of di- tank corps. Following the armi:
rector of intercollegiate athletics tice, he worked for a year, enterin,
at Wisconsin," was the statement of the University of Michigan in Fehr
Irwin C. Uteritz who received the ruary, 1920 and receiving his A..
unanimous endorsement of the degree four years laters.
Badger athletic council for the po- Irv Uteritag was an outstanding
sition of director of intercollegiate performer in two sports-football
athletics. He continued: "When I and baseball-at Michigan, e play-
*was an active participant in con- ed quarterback and directed the
ference sports, I can truthfully say Wolverine teams of--1921, 1922 and
that I always received n hardest 1923_ Pronlinently mentioned .f
competition when we met Wiscon- various honor teams in 1922 .he was
sin. If my nomination is confirmed, automatically eliminated from such
it will be my hope and aim to main- consideration -in his senior year
tain the high competitive standards when a broken, ankle kept him out
which have always characterized of the giames 'With- Wiseohsihn and
Wisconsin athletic teams during Illinois. Uteritz was also reguhaR
the period I have known them." infielder on the Michigan vasi 3
The council's recommendation of nine for three years and captainec
Uteritz as successor to George Lit- the team in his -senior year. J
-tle, who recently resigned the Do- : Following - his graduation fronm
sition, had to be ,confirmed by -Michigan, Uteritz entered t h e
President Frankand the Board of (Continued on Page 7)

*

Emnmy -Reid,. star Wolverine for-
ward, is completely recovered from
the injuries he sustained,. and in
the practice last night looked as
good as ever.
Senators and White Sox Turn
sack Several New Players
From Training Camps. .
CHICAGO, Jan. 6.-(P)-Quite a
number of young men who expect-
ed to display their stuff in Ameri-
can league training camps this
year, have been deprived of the
opportunity for economical rea-
sons.
The Washington Senators have
turned back eight players, includ-
ing Ad Liska, underhand pitcher,
who.,was released outright to the
Chattanooga club of, the Southern
association. The other seven, Pitch-
er Walter Masters, former Univer-
sity of Pennsyl,nia baseball and
football star; First Baseman Ha.r-
ley Boss, Infielders John Gill and
Al Powell, and Phelps, a catcher,
have been sent to the same club on
option.
The Chicago -White Sox have
turned over Infielder Irving Jef-
ries and Outfielder WilliscNorman
to St. Paul of the American asso-
ciation, as part payment for Out-

Men's Suits and Overcoats
Society Brand and other good makes.
Many of these Suits have two pair trousers.,:
$25.00 Suits and Overcoats $19.75

be watched by the
remainder of the
Big Ten. Co-cap-'
tain Kellar, whoa.
leads. the Boiler-
makers in con-
j u n c t i o n w ith W o d , a d s s
Wooden, and Ray
Eddy, blli a t
forward, are two
of thel u r d u e '

1
1
1

1 ;

A.K.L. Reaches Finals'
in Water Polo Meet
Alpha Kappa Lambda defeated
Phi Gamma Delta, 4 to 3, in a three-
period overtime battle to reach the
finals of the Interfraternity Water
Polo tourney. They will meet the
winner of the Theta Chi-Tau Delta
Phi gam~e. Theta Chi qualified by
defeafin Delta Sigma Pi; 4 to 0.
These two teams,aTheta Chi and
Tau Delta Phi,'will also meet in the.
semi-final round of themfraternity
dual swimming meet competition.'
Theta Chi *gained their position byl
outswimming Tau Epsilon Phi, 35-6.
Lambda Chi Alpha had already
beaten the Beta Theta Pi team, 27
I to 5, to become one finalist.

I.
,

Ceorge Watkins, Cardinal out-
fielder who starred in the final 1931
yworld's series game, has made a)
winter business connection in Hous-
-ton, Tex.
W N -W
ISz
.D _ T
o 'T
C rrtmag~uN.

$30.00 Suits and Overcoats $22.50

scoring aces, and
S t e w a r t, who .....
d roap pe d in 14
pointsagainst the JOHNNY WOOD
Hoosiers, is a logical successor
Stretch Murphy at center.
(Continued on' Pa~e 7)

1.

$35.00 Suits and Overcoats $26.25
40.00 Suits and Overcoats $30.00
$45.00 Suits and Overcoats $33.75
$5000 Suits and- Overcoats $37.50
Corduroy Coats at a Discount.
WADHAMS & Co
Main Street Firt- National Bank Building

to

_ L

fnelcer HlaroldAnderson, and have
released Outfielder George Black-
berry outright to Oakland of the
Pacific Coast league.,
A study by the American medical
association shows that the average
annual income of medical doctors
in the United States is $9,764.
Navesink light station, N. J., ori-
ginally erected in 1828, ranks as
the most powerful light in- the U.
S. lighthouse service with 9,000,000
candlepower.

During These Latter Winter Months
DOUBLE-CHECK ON THE FAMILY'S DIET
--Plenty of Vegetables . . . and a generous supply of
IURE DRINKING WATER
To Be Absolutely Sure, Serve
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER
Delivered to your home in case lots of 6 2-quart bottles.
We can also supply you with cheimically pure distilled water. -

If' You.rite, we bay. it.
Correspondence' Stationer7r,
Fount.in Pons, Ink, etc,
yperiters all maces.
Greeting Cards' for ev ybody.
}. D.'MOQR R IL I
314 S. State St., An Ar~ar.

BETT ER
HART SCHAFFNER & MARX
SUITS AND OVERCOATS-
for

.#, t

. I

ARBOR \SPRINGS WATER
416 West Huron Phone 8270

I., i

____ _ 4'

,!

5
x.
f
pp
4
r
4 A
x
i'
1
...x.35 V
:r dry
f 4
rv
OF
X
}
f}
t-
S
i
k
r,
v
9q
b

A

l

__ ._
__ _ _____ __
- - - - -
__ .. _ ,__
- ----
c

di I I

O

,y< at;.
r
" .
's, atT ti4 t ..

f

-I I

USSI HOs
IN CHORAL UNION CONCERT SERIES
WED.,J115

THAN EVEN THE PRICES
OF 16 YEARS AGO
IN THIS
anuary Sae
- r -Our entire stock of Hart Schaffner & Marx suits,
and overcoats have been put into thesel 3 groups
regardless of former' prices. ' Worsteds, crashes,
tweeds, cheviots, herringbones, lattice checks, di-
agonals.. Fleece- overcoats, Chesterfields, rare-wool
combinations, camel's hair-they're all here.
OVERCOATS.

!j

f

$1950

U S2650
LSUITS

- '$3354

36 dauntless former officers in the Imperial Russian
Army, now expdtriated-men without a country who
travel on "Mansen Passports."'-

and $3350
With extra trousers

4.

His .... ........ __. a .... - - ....__ ..- - _ _--... -- PA III

Ill

L

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan