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January 07, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-01-07

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THE MICHTOAN DAILY___

RASKOB DECLARES
DEMOCRATS MUST
STRESS NET ISSUE

GANDHI AIDE IMPRISONED IN POONA WITH MASTER
SSUBJET OF TALS
Family Relations Institute Will
Be Held During ,January
in Lane Hail.-

Would Submit Question
Voters; Party Must
'Stay on Fence.'

to

SPLIT IS

ALTERNATIVE

Party Chief Warns That Issue
Must Be Settled in Time'
for Convention.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 6.--(UP)#The
: emocratic party faced today the
freshly stated desire of Chairman
Raskob to keep the prohibition is-
sue to the fore in this year of presi-
dential election.

,

Under a warning that its virtual
destruction would be the alterna-
tive, the -chairman laid down a
pressing demand that theparty de-
clare at the conventionthis sum-
mer for submitting the entire ques-
tion to the people fo a new deci-
sion.
He was equally emphatic that the
party itself keep on the fence, go-
ing neither wet nor dry, until the
voters have had their say. Raskob
made public his views Tuesday
night in a lengthy letter to the na-
tional c.ommittee he; heads, supple-
mnenting this with remarks evoked
by questioning reporters who sur-
rounded him as he arrived for the
committee meeting Saturday.
Sees Split as Alternative.
The stand for resubmission; con-
tended the chairman, will allow the
contending elements in the party,-
both wets aid supporters of prohi-
bition, to find common ground. The
alternative, as he saw it, was either,
a party rent asunder, north against
south, or a party diminished in im-
portance by the rise of a third po-
litical group, a "liberal" party.
With publication of the letter
other business to come before the
committee session, such as selec-
tion of the convention city and
date, faded into the background.
Doesn't Propose Repeal.
To avoid a repetition of the out-
break he precipitated with the is-
sue last March, the chairman in-
tended, he said, to ask the com-
mittee to refer his'plan to the con-
vention, without declaring itself fpr
or against. But anoutbreak seem-
ed unavoidable, nevertheless.
The proposition A1askob wishes
laid before the voters does not in-
volve complete repeal of prohibi-
tion, but rather a choice between
retention of the eighteenth amend-

Takes to Housework.
After Anemia .Cure'
Four years ago a high school
football coach, whose namesmust
remain unprinted due to University
Hospital regulations, tipped the
beams at 400 pounds and towered
six feet tall. He got an infected leg
and his doctor told him he had an
anemic condition that could be
cured only by hearty eating. Not
that he wasn't already doing that.
So he atl and in three or four'
years he increased his avoirdupois.
152 pounds. Finding it impossible
to carry the 552 pounds more than
100 feet without puffing like a steam
epgine, he was forced to retire from
his job and take up his wife's job
of housekeeping while she in turn
took up teaching. He took a chair
where ever he went and sat down"
on it as he worked. t
His waist line was 89 inches. The
average is about 31. He maintained
his balance onfy by bending his
head back and spreading his Mfeet
apart.
Now Dr. L.,H. Newburgh, at the
University Hospital has him on a
strict diet of greens. When in for
treatment last month Mr.. X weigh-
ed 165 pounds less than when he
first, came here.
ment unmodified, and his "home+
rule" plan under which the people1
of each 'state could exempt them-
selves for national prohibition by;
voting for state liquor control.

Vocational Training of Teachers at Michigan

- A-ssociated Press Photo
Above is shown th exterior of Yeroda prison in .Poona where Gandhi was lodged following his arrest
in Bombay in Britain's newest campaign against civil disobedience in India. At the right is Pandit Jawa-
haril Nehru, Gandhi's second in command, who was also imprisoned with his master in Yeroda prison.
Overfattened Coach - Federal Government Appropriations Promote

That the vocational education
department of the Uni ersity is fi-
nanced by the federal governnrent,
in addition to the regular Univer-
sity appropriation, is not perhaps
a matter of common, knowledge
among students.
The foundation of federal aid to
vocatiotial education goes back to
the Morrill land grant act of 1862,
according to Prof. Thomas Diamond
of the Education school, who grant-_
ed pan interview apropos of the .re-
cent report of the National Advis-
ory Committee on Education. This
body, of which Dean J. B. Edmon-
son was a, member, advocated, after
two years of deliberation, a federal
education department headed by a

cabinet member created for this
purpose.
Michigan State college, an agri-
cultural school, exists under the
same Morrill land ,rant act, to-
gether with later supplementary
provisions.
The University of Michigan ap-
propriations, however, are made
under the terms of. the.: Smith-
Iughes act of 1917. Thus, the fed-
eral government provides a sum of
money equal to that expended by
the individual state for training of
vocational teachers.. The University:
vocational department, which trains
teachers in industrial education, is
financed by equal amounts of mon-
ey from federal and state govern-
ments, over and above the regular
University appropriation.
Ypsilanti Normal and Michigan
State colleges also share in the ap-
propriations made under this act,
.on the same state-federal basis.
Money for the training of agricul-
tural teachers is paid to Michigan
State, while that institution divides,
with the normal college the work of
schooling home economics teachers.
As the work under the Morrill
ac' began to. function, much agri-
cultural knowledge was gathered.
In order to carry that knowledge,
directly to .the farm, extension
courses to the farmer were provid- 1
ed for in 1914 by the Smith-Lever
act.

An institute of family relations
will be held at four o'clock on Sun-
day afternoons during January in
the auditorium of Lane Hall. Four
speakers have been secured to deal
I with problems of home life, and the
meetings and follow-up conferences
are under the general supervision
of the Unitarian Church.
The first speaker, who will speak
this Sunday, will be Dr. Robert
Dexter, secretary of the department
of social relations of the American
Unitarian association, Boston. He
will speak on. "Factors which Make
and Break the Home" and will re-
main over Monday morning to meet
anyone who desires a private con-
ference.
Other speakers in the series andC
their topics are, Dr. Katherine
Greene, "Problems of Child, Adjust-
ment" January 17; . Dr.. John F.
Shepard; "Personal Adjustment as
a Factor in Successful Living," Jan-
uary 24; Dr. Theophile Raphael, of
the University Health Service, on
"Young People and their Problems,'
January 31.
The object, of the lectures is to
bring information to the commun-
ity in the important matter of suc-
cessful home life. All adults of the
city, irrespective of the state of
their family relations are cordially
invited. The committee in charge of
arrangements have assured them-
selves that the institute:is not'over-
lapping with the work of any com-
'nunity welfare agency; several
committee members .also Are 'Aem-
bers of boards of various communi-
ty welfare bureaus.
Robe of Eider Down
Given to University
A robe made of the down of eider.
ducks and which was'once in the
possession of Alexander Graham
Bell has been donated to the Uni-
versity Mus ums by his daughter,
Mrs. David Fairchild.
This type of robe, once common*
among Labrador Indians, is now
rare and extremely valuable. U.' is
made of the skins and the soft
down'Of the birds and is sewed with
sinews. The border is trimmed with
the backs of. the heads.

Inmate Is Allowed
to Keep His Canary
Business in- Prison
WASHINGTON, Jan. 6.-(AP)-The
bird man. of Leavenworth peni-
tentiary'may keep his canaries.
A general prohibition of private
"business" in the prisons threat-
ened the avocation of Robert
Stroud, twice a murderer.
But officials tday fitted the rule
to the case, permnitting him to con-
tinue as a hobby-rider. unique
among all the federal prison pop-
ulation. .
Moreover, he probably will be
given a' double cell for his1 work,
and an oculist will guard his eyes
from injury froi the artificial light
under which he studies. The cur-
ious case has -moved one official
to determination Stroud shall have
a microscope and a scientific test
of a bird-cure he developed,
Something over 23 years ago,
Stroud, a youth of 20, left home in
Seattle for..Alaska. In a barroom
in Juneau, he quarreled, fought,
and struck a fatal blow. Convicted
of manslaughter, he ias sent to
Leavenworth. Seven fearslater,
he gave the signal for a riot at-
( tempt by fatally stabbing a guard
in the mess hall. Convicted againj
of murder, he was .saved..from. the'
gallows by Woodrow Wilson. He
has been in "the hole," as the pris-
oners call solitary confinement,
ever since.
One day a pair of sparrows drift-
ed into his cell. Stroud tamed
them, and 'got the idea of raising
a few canaries. Soon there was a
three-tiered rove of cages on the.
cell walls. When Stroud's mother.
came from Kansas City tosee him,>
she carried some of the, yellow sing.-
ers away and sold them. ,Together
they built up the occupation until
bird-fanciers over the nation were
seeking consultation' by mail.
Bromage Gives Report
on Rural Government
Five possible methods by which
the township system of rural gov-
ernment might be done away with'
were suggested by Prof. Arthur W..
Bromage, of the Political Science
department, in a report which, in,
his, capacity as chairman of the
sub-committee on township gov-
ernment, he delivered..before the
meeting of the County Government
committee of the National Munici-
pal League, held Dec. 28, 29, ', and
30 in Washington, I).C. r
The first of these methods was+
the transfer of township functions
to the county government; the sec-
ond vas a. blanket constitutional

Instruction

Band instruction classes by:Prof.
Joseph E. Maddy, of the School of
Music, will be resumed over the
University-of-the-Air beginning on
Feb. 15. Continuation of this pjo-
gram, which enrolled over 4,900
listeners in the radio year 1930-1,
is made possible by a grant from
the Carnegie Foundation.
An instruction book is now being
prepared by Professor Maddy wlvich
will be mailed to all wh'o' eriroIl in
the class this year. These books will
be sent free of charge 'oall'Ao
write to the broadcasting service
requesting them. .
Professor Maddy is at preset
endeayoring to -arrange. with the
N'atonal Broadcasting Compangto
have these radio band instructigns
broadcast over 'the chain facilities.
Saturday evening programs ill
'be broad stfrom 8:30 to 9 o'clock
in the future,;- it was announced
yesterday. This''clhange has been
made necessary by the scheduling
of. a special feature by station-WJR
at 8 o'clock.'
Various phases of George Wash-
ington's life will be presented n
a series 'of .pr'ogrms by Dr. Ran-
dolph G. Adams;. director of "the
tSilliarn . l...Clements :library; of
Afnerican .,history, beginning Jan.
16. Tfis will be in comrnemoration
of the 200th anniversary of ) is.
birth which is beirng celebrated this
year.' Dr. Adams will consider
Washington as a business man; a
real estate operator, a military
strategist, a President, and in con-
nection. with the making of the
constitution.
WMeeting; of Libradrians
Is Attended by Bishb p
Librarian William 'V. Bi ho ,
chairnan of the advisory grouaf.n
college libraries, will attend a me -
ing of that organization at. vSt
Briar, Virginia, 6n Jan. .7. Decem-
ber 2$ Librarian Bishop addressed
the librarians of the Cincinti
Public libraries in Cincinnati. 'e
will return to Ann Arbor Sunday
different ways, for removal at' tIe
option of the specific county unki r
consideration.
amendment for complete abolitio;'
and the, last three provide,' '

Professor Scheduled
February 15.

for'

BANP CASSS
GO ON AIR TO-1

Classes by

Lee,

Y.M.C.A.

Directorl

Forced to Resign Post
Herbert C. Lee, for many' years
active in directing boys' activities,
and for the past six years boys'
work secretary of the local Y.M.C.
A., has resigned his post because
of ill health, it was announced
yesterday.:
Mr. Lee was formerly located in
Duluth, Minn., before he took up
his work in Ann Arbor. He has been.
identified with several important
contributions to middle-western
boys' work, and was instrumental.
in the establishing of the Y.M.C.A.
summer camp. His home is-with, a
sister in Royal Oak for the present.

_.

ANNUAL

JR

SAE

Of Slater s Two Campus Bookstores Starts

Today

II

SALE

T EA T UIES-

EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY......
ONE DOLLAR"BOOKS".......

... 49 CENTS
... ' 79 CENTS

LATEST FICTION......... ...ONE THIRD OFF
OTHER FICTION AND NOVELS .... ONE HALF OFF-

BLACK AND GOLD LIBRARY
BOZORI CLASSICS
EBONY LIBRARY
ALL CHILDREN'S BOOKS....

. . . ..ONE THIRD OFF

..

.:..ONE FOURTH OFF

F ...

ALL POETRY ...
FINE BINDINGS

f ,.
" " " x

....ONE THIRDOFF
. ONFJOURTH OFF-

A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF MISCELLANEOUS

BOOKS AT .........15

CENTS PER COPY

I1

1500 Copies of the
MODERN LIBRARY
To Be Sold at 6 Cents Each

i

i

I

f

OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF STATIONERY FROMj29 CENTS TO 98 CENTS

A special table of technical books of interest to students of Science and Engineering-49 cents per copy.

LE BOEUF FOUNTAIN PENS......ONE HALF OFF
NOVELTY TABLE...... .... ."....ONE HALF OFF"
STATUARY ............... .........ONE HALF OFF
LAPS....................FROM 98 CENTSTO$4.75

FELT GOODS...... ... ..........ONE HALF OFF

BOOK

ENDS:....................ONEHALF-OFF

LAUNDRY CASES............ . .95c ENTS AND UP

.7.,m

LEATHER CASES ..........................40%

OFF

_: x 11 1

m

A -Air

41 1

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