100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 18, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'rHE MICHICAN DAILY
WHY DOESN'T SAM CALL HIM?

Published every morning except Monday during the UniVcrsity year
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
rlited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ass matter. Special rate of postage grante4 by Third Assistant
bstmaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.69
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Cihigan. - Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L TOBIN
Ity Editor .....-.............................Carl Forsythe
ditorlal Director ..............................Beach Conger, Jr.
ews Editor .*............................ David M. Nichol
ports Editor ...................-.-....Sheldon O. Fullerton
omen'. Editor.......................Margaret M. Thompson
ssistant News Editor......................... Robert L. Pierce

I

Joe

After the theatre drop in and have
icious malted mhlk or hot chocolate
a toasted sandwich.

aWd

Parkers

AT THE

HUB

Next to the
.Michigan'

Cafe

TONIGHT

Try our hot 40c Noonday Luncheons
From 11 to 1
Complete line of Gilbert Chocolates

The

Michigan Theatre Building

Four Aces

ok B. Gilbreth
and A. Goodman
Karl lseifert

NIGHT EDITO
J. Oullen Kenn

RS
aedy James Inglis
Jerry E. Rosenthal
George A. Stauter

U

I

Featuring

11

J. Myers
sne4

ainley W. Arnheim
wson E. Becker
ward C. Campbell
Williams Carpenter
omas Connellau
nuel G. Ellis
rothy Brockman
rlam Carver
atrice Collins
rise Crandall
ie Feldman
idence Foster

Sports Assistants
John W. Thomas
REPORTERS
Fred A. Huber
Norman Kraft
Roland Martin
HIenry Meyer
Albert H. Newman
E. Jerome Pettit
Georgia Gelsman
Alice Gilbert
Martha Littleton
Elizabeth Long
Frances Manehester
Elizabeth Mann

To Our Friends and Patrons

John S. Townsend
Charles A. Sanford
John W. Pritchard
Joseph Renihan
C. Hart Schaaf
Brackley Shaw
Parker R. Snyder
G. R. Winters
Margaret O'Brien
Hillary Rarden
Dorothy Rundell
Elma Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhams

.,

[it

FRI. & SAT.
NIGHT
FAREWELL

In appreciation of your good will we extend the
Heartiest of Yuletide Greetings and wish you good

I JACK SLATER

PARTY

our

health and success in 1932.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
ARLES T. Kline.......... ............Business Manager
RRIS P. JOHNSON .....................Assistant Manager
Department Managers
ertising .. ...... . ........ ....... .... ....Vernon Bishop
'ertising Contracts.........................Harry R. Begley
ertising Service............................Byron C. Vedder
lications ...................................William T. Brown
ounts ......................................Richard Stratemeir
men's Business Manager .........................Ann W. Verner

Make reservations for
New Year's Party

EARLE BOOT SHOP

Ph one 9228

123 EAST LIBERTY STREET

I

r s !

Aronson
t E. Bursley
Clark
t Finn
a Becker$

Assistants
John Keyser
Arthur F. Kohn.
James Lowe
Anne Harsha
Katharine Jackson
Dorothy ILayin
Virginia McComb
Carolin Mosher
Helen Olsen

Grafton W. Sharp
Donalo A. Johnston II
Don Lyon
Bernard H. Good

May Seefried
Minnie Seng
Helen Spencer
Kathryn Stork
Clare Unger
Mary Elizabeth Watts

Vischgrund
meyer
rriman

TIGHT EDITORS-Margaret O'Brien, Elsie Feldman
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1931
t Class
~ Spirit of '35
. xYLASS spirit, a quality almost extinct at Michi-
"-i gan, is being revived by the class of 1935. The
freshmen this year have shown an initiative and
co-operation in class activities which has not been
approached for many years in the past.
This new spirit first appeared in the violence
of the freshman elections this year. As ardent
campaigning was done by the yearlings as was
ever done by a seasoned campus politician in his
senior elections. The next evidence of the dawn
of ne vigor for the class was the fervency and
vehemence with which the Fall games were fought
by the new class. It administered a crushing re-
bake to the half-hearted enthusiasm shown by the
sophomores.
Recently when the committee appointments of
the class came out, committees were included on
tradition and discipline.- It was announced that
these committees would co-operate on the question
of enforcing the wearing of "pots" as a matter of
class pride. Heretofore the yearlings have been
quite content to allow all the enforcement to be
done from the outside.-
And now the freshmen are collecting class dues
to buy their page in the 'Ensian and to start get-
ting the money for a memorial. This is before they
have been here one semester. They are optimistic
as well as conscientious.
This year the men have been deprived of the
opportunity for recreation which the fraternity
offers to freshmen and have consequently had to
turn their attention to other forms of endeavor.
The class organization was the most natural of
these and has benefited.
But, we wonder, does class spirit in a college
with classes of the size of ours serve any real and
worthwhile purpose?
EDITORIAL COPMENTI
BIG THREE OF THE BIG TEN
(Daily Northwestern)
A Chicago newspaper story reveals that,the West-
ern Conference faculty athletic representatives voted
before the Purdue game to refuse permission to the
Nortiwestern football team for the Rose bowl game
with Southern California.
Naturally the Purdue defeat put an end to North-
western's desire to play on the coast, but the refusal
of the Conference stands, nevertheless, and stands
in just as unfavorable a light as the charity arrange-
ments made by the so-called Big Ten.
When the votes of these faculty representatives
were called for by mail, Northwestern had played a
game with Notre Dame from the proceeds of which
she contributed $100,000 to the unemployed. Further-
more, Northwestern had agreed to devote the pro-
ceeds of the Purdue game to charity, as well as to
risk two-thirds of the title for the benefit of others
in need of charity-Purdue and Michigan.
The revelation that the conference would take
everything from Northwestern and give nothing
merely adds another black mark to the recent record
of that august body.
We sincerely hope that in the future Northwest-
ern's athletic representatives will be less willing to
contribute money, prestige, and titles rightfully won
for the benefit of an organization which appears by
all its actions to be controlled by a minority of three
schools whose athletic directors have been active in
the conference for more than twenty-five years.

Grimes evidently considered it unnecessary to
add George Huff to the list, with Zuppke already on
it. The intrigues and wire-pulling of this group would
make interesting reading in any newspaper, and we
hope that the junior members of the conference com-
mittees will act to make the usual "star chamber"
sessions open and available to those who desire to
learn the truth.
I CIEEN IREFLECTllONS I
COMING TO THE MICHIGAN
There is little doubt that by far the largest part
of the credit for the success of "Private Lives" must
go to Noel Coward, who, as author and male lead of
the farce that convulsed first London and later New
York, is responsible forlines that are powerful enough
to enable the play to stand practically as a two-part
show. Actually there are only four actors who have
more than two speeches in the entire play.
By rare good fortune the motion-picture adapta-
tion of this play boasts the services of two genuine
stars, both eminently capable of doing complete just-
ice to the magnificent lines. They do just that.
Contrasted with the extreme simplicity of plot
and action, the dialogue fairly sparkles with clever-
ness and originality, which, adequately clothed in the
talents of Norma Shearer and Robert Montgomery,
gets over to the audience with the force of machie-
gun volleys.
Probably for the first time in her career Miss
Shearer has dropped the slightly sickening hauteur
that has always been so characteristic of her, and
presents a performance, for once, that is entirely
human. Together with the suave, somewhat bewil-
dered self-confidence of -Robert Montgomery she ac-
complishes an extremely amusing series of ultra-
sophisticated comedy situations.
Excellent foils for the brilliance of the two leads
are included in the cast in the persons of Una Merkel
and the almost-forgotten Reginald Denny. Although
Miss Merkel is not given a chance to air her beautiful
southern drawl, she forms a very nice background
for Mr. Montgomery and Miss Shearer, as does Denny
also.
Private Lives" is being offered by the Michigan as
par ofthe Christmas holiday bill next week.
VACATION PROSPECTS
At the Michigan
Of the ten players featured in five pictures billed
at the Michigan for the two-week vacation period at
least eight are real stars, all of which makes us just
a little sorry-well, not really sorry-that we are not
going to be here to see them.
First of all, "The Champ," with Wallace Beery and
Jackie Cooper, opening Sunday, brings back one of
the two child actors the screen has ever succeeded
in pushing to stardom as well as one of its best heav-
ies. It is followed by "Blonde Crazy," featuring James
Cagney and Joan Blondell.
Next on the list is "Private Lives," with Norma
Shearer and Robert Montgomery, reviewed above, fol-
lowed by Claudet Colbert and Gary Cooper in "His
Woman." Finally there is that great stage show,
"Flying High," starring Bert Lahr and Charlotte
Greenwood.
At the Majestic
The Majestic starts off its holiday bills tomorrow
with "The Unholy Garden," starring Ronald Colman.
Favorable reviews have followed this action drama,
which deserves to be called one of Colman's best,
wherever it has been exhibited.
Next come George Bancroft and Robert Ames in
"A Rich Man's Folly," followed by Seth Parker in
"Way Back Home," which is slated to run a full week.
The final show before the resumption of school will
star Marilyn Miller. It is "Her Majesty Love."

T.ROLE L Rai
MERRY
MICHAEUMAS
And here we are standing on the
bink of the last sober day we must
spend under the loving eye of the
administration. Personally,,we in-
tend to go straight home and have
a good drink of invigorating pop
to celebrate.
* * *
This going home business
sounds awfully simple and nice
just to say-kind of rolls off
of the t e and all like that,
but didyo ever stop to think
what a lot of trouble may be
found in those two words.
Method (1)...Walk out to the
'top of the hill on Washtenaw;
put on weary expression as of
man who-has walked from She-
boygan since last night; and
wave arms at all passers-by
who aren't driving Fords. This
will bring seldom if any results.
Method (2)...Proceed as in meth-
od (1), varying the process by ly-
ing down in puddle of oil, face
down, wearing expression of one
three days dead. The oncoming
cars will swerve to avoid dirtying
up their wheels with the remains
and, possibly, go in the ditch. This
method often results in your hav-
ing company as you stand around
in the blizzard which invariably ac-
companies such expeditions.
Method (3)...If you live in De-
troit, go to Michigan Central Sta-
tion (adv.) and get onto. a train
to Chi cagao. If, after you get
there, you still want to go home,
you will find their service very sat-
isfactory. This is infinitely quicker
than attempting to do anything
with the present schedule from
Ann Arbor.
DAILY POEM
See the nice, green grass around
us.
Raindrops f r o m the grey
skies fall.
No one else will have a Merry
Christmas either.
It's a fine world after all!
* * a
We trust that you have noticed
that not a word is being said about
Little Yvonne Fagan today. We
don't expect gratitude, but you
might have just mentioned it.
* * *
And when Christmas Day fi-
nally comes around, we cer-
tainly hope that you won't for-
get to send the Administration
a nice lily tied with a blue rib-
bon to show how much we all
appreciate their purity of heart,
integrity of purpose, a n d, '
above all, that fine spirit which
leads them to peek confidently
over our shoulders and into our

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
Ministers
7:00-8:30 - Christmas Communion
Service.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE SOUL'S RENAISSANCE"
Dr. Fisher
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"CHRISTMAS AROUND THE
WORLD"
Mrs. Fisher
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
South Fourth Avenue
Theodore R. Schinale, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "The Desire to See
God's Glory."
11:00 A. 1.-Worship in German.
7:00 P. M.-Young People's League.

THE
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets
WESLEY HALL
6:00 o'clock (evening) Guild service,
choral singing. Miss Mildred
Sweet, director.
7:00 P. M.--Supper.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, Associate
10:45 A. M.-Morning'Worship.
"The Wonder Story by Mary the
Mother."
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing,

7:00 P. M.-Church
mas Service.

School. Christ-

,.

Id

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, December 20
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "The Radiance of
the Christian Religion."'
4:00 P. M.--A Christmas Play and
Pagent by the church school.

BE
CONSISTENT IN
YOUR
RELIGION

THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State

R. Edward Sayles,
Howard R. Chapman,
Students.
9:30 A. M.-Church
Watt, Supt.

Minister
Minister for
School. Mr.

ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

10:45 A. M.-Mr. Sayles will preach
on "The Charm of Christmas."
The students remaining in the city
are asked to come to the Guild House
Sunday evening at 6:00 P. M. as
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Chapman.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Is the Uni-
verse, including Man, Evolved by
Atomic Force?"
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morring service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
Testimonial Meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, i$ open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, 'except
Sundays and legal holidays. p
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERN
CHURQH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Sunday, December 20
9:30 A. M.-German.
10:45 A. M.-English.
7:30 P. M.-Evening advent serv-
ice Christmas Eve.
6:30 P. M.-Children's Service.
Christmas Day
9:30 A. M.-German.
10:45 A. M.-English.
Sunday, Dec. 27
9:30 A. M.-German.
10:.45 . M Enlili

ZION LUTHERN CHURCH
Washington Street and 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Bible School. Lesson
topic: "God's Greatest Gift to'
Love."
10:30 A. M.-Service with advent
sermon by pastor. Topic: "The
Lost Values."
7:30 P. M.-A chorus of forty

THE "UPPER ROOM"
BIBLE CLASS
For all "Michigan" Men. The
Class that is "Different."
,Every Saturday Evening, from
Seven to Eight O'clock.
"Discussion" Section meets Sun-
day Morning' at 9:30.

Every Tuesday Evening at 7:00
o'clock.
JOHN'S GOSPEL, "the greatest
book in the world."
A Class for both Women zand Men. II

II

11 11

.II I h

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan