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December 08, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, 1931

THE MIC14 AN A *

~, 9~1THEMIIGA DALY
,_ _ _=
. = - -PP

n

S IST
CHAIRMANFPLAY
Women to Hold General Meet-
ing for Junior Girls' Play
Next Tuesday.
WILL EXPLAIN TRYOUTS
Jean Bpts ord, Emily Bates, and
Dean Lloyd to Be Speakers
Non Program.
Margaret Ferrin, was named as-
sistant chairman of the 1932 Junior
Girls' Play yesterday by the cen-
tral comm tee in place of Mary
Barnett, who resigned the position.
A general meeting of the women
of the junior class will be held at
4:15 o'clock next Tuesday, Dec. 15,
in the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Jean Botsford, general chairman
of the play, vill conduct the meet-
ing and will explain the details of
eligibility, and of the appointments
for tryouts. Dean Alice M. Lloyd
and Emily Bates, '32, general chair-
man of the play last year will be
on the program.
To Explain Tryouts.
Since the director, Miss Harriet
Brasier will not be in Ann Arbor
for the meeting, a letter from her
giving suggestions and advice to the
tryouts will be read. The type of
performance which the tryouts are
t4 give will be explained by one of
the speakers.
First tryouts will be held Jan. 7.
8, 9. On Thursday and Friday, Jan.
7, 8, the time will be from 3 to 6
o'clock, and on Saturday from 9
to 12 o'clock in the morning. Ap-
pointments willbe made the first
of that week.
Must Be Eligible..
All Junior women are eligible for
the play if they have an average of
C for last semester and no E in any
subject. Second semester juniors
who were not in last year's play
and second zsemester sophomores
who are not planning to tryout for
next year's play are eligible.Jun-
ior women who a.re new on pampus
may tryout only if they receive
special permission from the dean
of women's office ;
Sinice the tryouts are to be held
immediately after Christmas va-
cation, it is important that all jun-
ior women and all others planning
to tryout, should attend the meet-
ing. All womeh on committees
should be present.
Exer ises ead.
Limbering ex rcises in prpara-
tion for the tryoQts have been held
for the past four weeks and will
continue this week from 4:30 to
5:30 o'clock today and Thursday.
Margaret Schermack and Margaret
Smith are in charge of the classes.
A regular meeting of the entral
coArmittee wll be held at 4 o'clock
next Monday afternoon in the un-
d rgraduate ofd ce of the League.

WORST ED POPULAR SORORITY HISTORIES, TRADITIONS, I
IIL FL SOCIETY TRACED AND COMPARED BY WRITER
:arue o Greek Organizations ternities. The students of Barnard
Helen Newberry.ND'sc ssed in Recent College, Columbia University voted
--ALast Thiday eveni Mrs. Flor- /rtcle. sororities out several years ago. In
c mne Members of Music ence W. Tousey, director of 'Helen marked contrast to the fraternity
NSchool Entertained by Trio Newberry, and Miss Eunice Van "In 1837 the L C. Sorosis, later situation, in which the best chap-
F Dti Camp, assistant director, enter- to become Pi Beta Phi, was organ- ters generally are found in small
__e___ tained at an informal dinner. The ized at Monmoiuth College in Ill- New England colleges, the women's
Members of the Xi chapter of guests were Miss Dorothy Ogborn, nas" stated Nelson Antrim Craw- colleges of the East will, fo tne
Dta Omicron, national music sor- secretary to the Dean of Women; most part, have none of sororities.
mt mroatnamuisr-Miss Ellen B. Stevenson, research fr na ril Gdesso Goucher admits thes, but the /are
Soarity, were bostesses at a reception assistant in the office of the Dean Learning" which appeared in the under the ban at Vassar, Smith,
Mis llnNovembeon esarhr i sua artic e "Godessor Guhiadicthmaunte~
:> from 5 to 7 Sunday night in the o Women; Mlle. Eveline Fournier, November issue of the American Wellesley, Mount Holyoke, and else-
assistant director of Jordan hall, Mercury. where," affirms the author.
Grand Rapids room of the League Miss Sara W. Lutes assisan "Kappa Alpha Theta was formed Mr. Crawf rd comments on the
+J buildingdirector of Mosher hall. in 1870 and because it adapted the points considered in the selection
Guss nlue tefautyadMosher Jordan. ree; letters, argues priority with of nei members by the sororities.
.1fdirectors of the School of Music, Sunday at dinner Mrs. Mary E.the Pi Phis who were a bit slow in He lists social standing, wealth, at-
active and alumnae members and Buffinger, assistant director of sensing the advantages of a name tractiveness, and scholarship.
patronesses of the Sigma Alpha Mosher hall, entertained Prof. and made up of Green letters. Kappa "Aside from their literary efforts,
Iota and My Phi Epsilon music sor- Mrs. Raleigh Nelson, and Prof. and Kappa Gamma was founded-like sororities resemble the adults wo-
orities, and all women members Mrs. Neil H. Williams. Pi Beta Phi-at Monmouth College, men's societies in their interest in
of the, School of Music. Mlle. Eveline Fournier, assistant in 1870," the author states, social service. Most of the organi-
Mrs. 0. E. Hunt, Mrs. R. C. Hus- director of Jordan hall, also enter- "Toddy there are 40 national sor- zations contribute financially and
sey, Mrs. J. B. Schoenfeldt, Miss tained Sunday at dinner. Her orities, with a membership, living otherwise to cha.ritable institutions,
Louise Cuyier, and Mil Erie Weber guests were Mr. and Mrs. Stonbock. and departed, of about 250,000. This principally hospitals, and the work
were in the reception line. Mrs. cunpares with 80 male fraternaties, of some of them in this field is very
Albert Peck, Mrs. T. Klingmanwith 800,000 members elaborate," affirms the author.
* MsE.LWitnnadMr.W Mrs. Bacher to Fete elawithe,8,0afirms members.r
n. dpMrs. E. L. Whitman, and Mrs. W. -Chi Omega, founded in 1895, has "The fact is that Socialism and
L. Badger presided at the tea Wyver at Din the largest number of chapters- other advanced movements have a
tables. 87. Pi Phi is second wth 78; Delta good deal of support even among
Miss Ether Jhnson, violinst, Mrs. Byrl Bachr, assistant dean Delta Delta, 76; Kappa Delta, 64; the undergraduate sorority mem-
Mrs. Pauline Johnson Kay, pianist, of wo men, will entertain members Kappa Kappa Gamma, 63; and bers. If I were a Socialist," the au-
and Miss Ward, cellist, were the of Wyvern at a supper at 6:30 Zeta Tau Alpha, 61. The others thor concludes, "I should assert
members of the Mozart Trio which o'clock tonight in her home on' range from 6 to 60. that this is due to the women hav-
played during the reception. This East University. Sororities are found today in most. ing more brains; in a point of fact,
oria, which cams from the Institute Several members of the junior of the coeducational c leges and they probably have."
of Musical Art in Detroit, is an or- class elected will be present. They .universities that admit fraternities. - - --
ganizati n of the Bta Chapter of are Anne Neberle, Elizabeth Eagles- Curiously, they are barred from
:Y J{ LDelta Omicron in that city, and i. field, Elizabeth Gribble, and Adele Lhe University of Chicago, although
well known for its radio perfor- Ewing. that institution has 39 or more fra-We
.mances, and ccncerts in the-middle -- - ---
west.
This novelty worsted tailleur with T'Ihe ta table was particularly at-Ad da
the season's three button front is tractive wimh a crystal bowl filled All Hats Reduced for CEarance
further enchanced by the mellon with roses, snap-dragons, a n dKA
sleeve and seat colar. A bright sweet peas in the center. Ferns,MCINS Y H TSHOP
green feather wing droops from the crysanthemums, and tapers com- / 227 South State Street
brim of the small turban. pleted the decorations of the room.

TP T
TO BEGN T
Michigan Negative'Te
poses Western Norr
War Debt Questio
Women's debate season
tonight at Kalamazoo whe
from Michigan, upholding
:ative side of the question
ing the cancellation of w
will meet a team from the
,State Normal College in E
debate. Those women on 1
igan team are: Dorothy
'32, Gladys Baker, '33, ant
Johnson, '33.
On the evening of Dec.:
from Albion College will
this campus to discuss t
'tive side of the propositio
the following women fro
gan: Helen Haapamaki,
thy Peck, '315, and Alice S8
The two varsity debat
are to be with Northwes
Indiana universities will k
question of complet inde
for India accordingto the
Mahatma Ghandi.
Announcement was m
week, by Mr. Floyd' K. Ril
of the wo:.nen's squad,
members of these varsit
had been chosen.
nave a Delicious I

of

TSY ROSS CA
Sec a pound
(Try a pound today)

f _.. __ __...,_ _.:. ....._ _. _____._

.

s
.

Pre-Inventory

/

BETSY ROSS SHC
Nickels Arcade

HA

is
kd
:
:

6':P 30 a. tInn. to 5 P. iM.

_. __
, '
x J . '
s ':_ ,
fi i.
,- "sue ,"
; , {fit .

r ITC AKlE S
Christ yas cookies
(Atractively Wrapped for
Gifts)

lili!!!!i

St
TheyUrELpartof a
LEISU YLY TA UCATli

For this sale, All h'ghcr priced ats in e cdepartvmen', in-
cluding those formerly pr ced from $7.50 to $18.00, have
been feduced to the one pi'eof

$'-1 895

/

PLACE YOUR ORDER EARLY

Q
' l/ ,
i,
i4 i

at

The group includes satins, crepes, feits, metallics and velvets
in all the popular shades. Wide range of headsizes.

The Ml"'chilgan League
Food Shop

.,

f

One Special Group of Hats
2 for $1.50
No Approvals-No Exchanges-All Sales Final
A }C O "IB S %J N'S

4

Teleph o
23251

Lots of college' girls actually think that great
thoughts start with the toes! . At least, it's
easier to start thinking when one's toes are re-
laxed in Daniel Green's cheerfullittle leisure
slippers.,
Come in and try on some'of these gay af-
fairs. We offer enchanting styles in fabrics
and colors to match the newest lounging pa-,
jamas. You'll want several pairs.

Goodyear's carry an exclusive line of
Daniel Greens in dainty silk or bright
leather.
SHOE SALON, SECOND FLOOR

W

Do

I

I

GIVE LUGGAGE
this Christmas

ot

Men'san
A L L VJWomne n's

IN A'GREAT STOCK REF,-3UClWfr;, DRIVE

i

Every college girl loves smart to
ing luggage-particularly overni
and week-end bags for the inforj
social week-ends that are a part
college life. Goodyear's are show
an array of chic leather bags,-so
fitted with toiletries and others
fitted.

OVER 1000 PAIRS MUST BE TURNED INTO CASH IN A RYIMUST BE DONE

395 Pairs
$10.00 and $11.00
shoes-new fall and

350Pal'rs
$8.50, $9.00 and
$10.00 shoea-f4all
and winter styles. All
styles and leathers,

of Pairs
of. fine grain or cad: .

1c, -
4
a
75 Pairs

Unfitted

of $6.00 shoes

f or

bags, in brown or black leather, attractively lined, priced
$2.95 and up

Should sell

at $7.50

dress or street wear,
that we have left, will

winter
grains

styles

Scotch

and calfskins.

pair. They go in this
sale and
t~11 'i

Leather bags, brown or black leather, beautifully lined and
$3.75 and up

to go

go fast at
this low

& AOAdb

$Aa9

SHOE SALON, SECOND FLOOR

goI i

m V -- * .1!.ED AL- ACLE i m

r

m

II

I

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