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December 06, 1931 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-12-06

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ESTABLISHED
VOL. XLII. No. 60 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1931
LOEL L R. BAYLS Irish Actors Will Arrive f T Tulane Defeats MAYBE SENATOR iflV
...i- .aw . WNl !/ ' P vrr i r H e v,_, . . : _

MEMBER~
ASSOCIATE
PRESS
PRICE FIVE

KILLED DURNil THY 1UUUy jor
Twenty actors, the official com
pany of the Irish Free state, wi
arrive this afternoon for a three

Pilot Crashes at Wayne Airport
When Plane Rolls Over
in the Air.

PARACHUTE

NO HELP

Held Thompson Air Trophy;
Won Second Place in Ameri.
can Flying terby.
DETROIT, Dec. 5.-(P)-Lowell R.
Bayles, 31-year-old speed pilot, was,
killed Saturday in an effort to break
the world's speed record. He had

streaked down is a long drive tc
start his first lap over the three-
kilometer course at Wayne County
Airport when the plane roiled over
twice in the air, dived into the
ground and burst into flames with
a violent explosion.
Bayles was hurled through a wire
fence, his body burned beyond rec-
ognition. The engine rolled some
50 feet along the Wabash right-of-
way, and burning remnants of the
plane were scattered over a wide
area. Observers estimated that the
ship was traveling well over 300
miles an hour when the crash came.
Officials See Crash.
The mishap occurred directly in
front of timers and newspapermen,
fragments of the ship narrowly
missing the watchers.
There was no chance for the pilot
to escape, though even when racing
at low altitudes he made it a prac-
tice to wear a parachute. He had
told friends that in the event of
an accident he hoped to zoom suf-
ficiently high to make a parachute

.
',
a
Y
a
i
L
r
iI
.!

day presentation of the Abbey thea
tre's repertory of Irish dramas
Monday night the company wi
open with: Lennox Robinson's far
cial comedy, "The White Heade
Boy."
Other plays scheduled for Tues
day and Wednesday include "Th
Far-Off Hills" by Lennox Robinson
Sean O'Casey's "Juno and the Pay
cock," and "John Ferguson" by St
John Irvine.
The presentation of the plays o
the Abbey company in Ann Arbo
is being sponsored by Play Produc
tion, and will be made in the Men
delssohn theatre. Lennox Robin
son, author of two of the plays and
director of the Abbey group for th
past twenty years, will arrive her
with the company, it was learned
yesterday.
Outstanding actors of the Abbey
repertory company include Arthur
Shields, who plays Denis Geogha-
gen, the title role in "The White-
headed Boy," Eileen Crowe who
takes the part of Mrs. Geoghagen
and Maureen Delaney who takes
the part of "Aunt Ellen," also in
MAYOR TO PRES I
AT CHURCHSERVICE
Newkirk to Talk at Unitarian
Church on Obstacles to
the Ideal Community.'

jump possible.
Racing for the mark, Bayles, was
compelled to fly lower than 162 feet
for the sake of accuracy in tim-
ing. Had he been able to right the
plane iomentum might have car-
ried him to a 1,000-foot altitude and
made escape possibe. -
Cause of Accident Unknown.
The cause of the accident prob-
ably never will be known, so com-
plete was the destruction of the
little monoplane. It is likely, how,-
ever', that some portion of the con-
trol system gave way, under 'the
tremendous strain.
He flew a Gee Bee monoplane
driven by a Wasp engine, super-
charged to give nearly 800 horse-
power. A 300-horsepower engine or-
dinarily would be considered large
for such a diminutive ship. It con-,
sisted of very little but the giant
engine, abbreviated wings, a closed
cockpit and the tail surfaces.
Bayles was an experienced racing
pilot, particularly in the small plane,
field. Last September he won the,
Thompson Trophy Race at Cleve-
land, America's premier airplanea
speed classic.
In the summer of 1930 he took
second place in the All-Americana
Flying Derby, which started and
ended in Detroit. Flying a 100-
horsepower plane in this race, he1
made a circuit of the West whicht
took him over hundreds of miles
of hazardous terrain.
UNION ASCAIN
ELECTS PR ESIDENT
P. A. Butts of Wisconsin Named;}
E. S. Drake Picked for
Secretary.t
I letion of officers for the com-
ing year marked the closing session
of the twelfth annual convention of
the Association of College Unions
which was held in Ann Arbor Fri-1
day and yesterday.
P. A. Butts, director of the Wis-f
consin Union, was elected president
and E. S. Drake, Union manager att
Ohio State university was re-elect-E
ed secretary.E
It was voted at the final sessionc
to change the name of the groupc
from the Association of College andi
University Unions, to the Associa-t
tion of College Unions. The con-
stitution of the organization was
also revised and several additions
made.
The Universities of North Caro-
lina and Alabama were voted into
the association and will have dele-
gates at the next convention. This
, na 'ha iat ohest,.N V _

Speaking on the "Obstacles to the
Ideal Community," H. Wirt New-
kirk, mayor of Ann Arbor, will pre-
side at the services this morning in
the Unitarian church. Mayor New-
kirk's talk is one of a series of
studies on "community - minded-
ness." At the student discussion
group in the evening, Miss Florence
Pollock, a local attorney and Uni-
versity graduate, willspeak on "The
Professional Woman in Modern
Life."
At the morning } worship in the
First Methodist Episcopal church,
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher will speak
on "Saving Our Civilization." His
topic for the evening service is
"Climbing Mount Everest."
Three services at 8, 9:30, and 11
will be given over to communion at
St. Andrew's Episcopal church this
morning. At the 11 o'clock service,
the Rev. Henry Lewis will preach on
"A Living Book in a Living Age."
Henderson to Lead.
"The Astonishing Tales by the
Unknown Shepherd" is the sermon
topic of Rev. Merle H. Anderson for
this morning's service in the First
Presbyterian church. Prof. W. D.
Henderson, director of the Exten-
son division of the University, will
lead the young people's meeting at
6:30 o'clock on "Science and the
Bible."
Rev. Allison Ray Heaps, of the
First Congregational church has
taken for his sermon topic, "Reli-
gion as Experience." At the 6:30
o'clock meeting, Prof. L. C. Karpin-
ski, of the mathematics department
of the University, will speak.
The morning sermon at the First
Baptist church, the Rev. R. Edward
Sayles, pastor, will preach on "The
Triumph of Love." Rev. C. W. Car-
penter, pastor of the Second Baptist
church, will speak on "The Ameri-
can Negro, an Asset or Liability,
Which?" at the evening service.
To'Give Advent Sermon.
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale, pastor
of the Bethlehem E v a n g e l ic a 1
church, will give a sermon on
"Trumpet of Warning," while at
7:30 o'clock, the Elmhurst College
Glee club will give a concert. The
Zion Lutheran church service at
10:30 o'clock will be the advent ser-
mon of the pastor, the Rev. E. C..
Stellhorn.-,
"God, the Only Cause and Crea-
tor" will be the topic of the sermon
at the First Church of Christ, Sci-
entist. At St. Paul's Lutheran
church, Rev. C. A. Brauer will speak
on "The Day Spring from on High,
Hath Visited Us." At 7:30 o'clock,
tha second sevening advent service
will be held, with the sermon, "The
Star of Jacob," and communion.
Cut Student Admission
for Hockey Contests
Admission prices to students for
r-o-nlai-r ehadn1Pr1 hnekrv, tromeo

Drama Series MES
- the "Whiteheaded Boy."
1 [This present tour of the company T 1 11 II fl
- represents their first visit to this
country within the last seventeenD
s-years. Suet
s When the Abbey company was Students May Enroll in Societ'
ll first established it was decided that of Anti-Prohibitionists
- no "stars" would be mentioned in at Heaq ter
d the publicity. They -have followed aquarers.
that policy since in spite of the
fact that such eminent actors as REGISTER FROM 2 TO 6
e Eileen Crowe, F. J. McCormick,
a, Barry Fitzgerald, Maureen Delaney, Michigan Is First Midwester
- P. J. Carolan, and Denis O'Dea are College to Organize
t. in the company.oO ae
"T h e Whiteheaded Boy" deals Crusader Unit.
f with the story of Denis Geogha-
r gen, depicted as a selfish young Registration for membership ii
- man for whom his whole family of the Crusaders, nitional anti-prohi-
- brothers and sisters are merciless- bition society, wIll commence at e
- ly sacrificed. The comedy relates o'clock tomorro afternoon at th
d the story of their attempts to re- side desk in thelobby of the Union
e volt against this tyranny, and frus- Members of the organization com-
e tration when Denis neatly turns mittee will be a the desk for the
d the tables on them. remainder of the afternoon.
Another outstanding play of the Students who wish to enroll ir
y. series is "John Ferguson" by St. the Michigan b4tallion may do sc
r John Irvine. This is a tragedy any time this week between 2 and (
- which describes the long train of o'clock at the Uion. where head-
catastrophies which overtake the quarters will be i aintained by offi-
p hero of the drama and the way cers of the local unit. Membershir
his character is strengthened rath- buttons, cards, aid reading matter
er than crushed by the weight of will be available to prospective
his misfortunes, members.
The campus unit was organized
H Every Club; two weeks ago 1by Louis Bredin
as gstate commander, C. A. Deane, o
.Tik the Detroit advisory committee, and
Is Set 4q rcks William Lewis, state executive sec-
retary. A group of students inter-
on Bid of Spades ested in the orgahization heard the
speakers explain the history of the
group, its aims, and organized,
In spite of the fact that thirteen electing officers and naming an or-
clubs in one bridge hand were dealt ganization committee to function
to R. Beverly -Herbert, '32E, in a the commencement fthe
contract game at the Alpha Delta untmembership campaign drive
Phi fraternity house yesterday, he Additional officers in the batal-
and his partner were set four tricks. lion will be appointed from the new
His partner, who had the ace, members as soon as the drive gets
king, queen, jack, ten, and three mmesudrwy codn oBah
low 'spades, bi e ven spades oe'under way, according to :Beach
e seven club bid oderbert's oeraConger; Jr., '32, president and com-
'of the evcu opponents, do opened' the bid- mander of the Michigan batallion.
ding with one diamond, Herbert, Michigan is the first mid-West
courting a double when his final college to organize a Crusader unit.
declaration of seven would be Batallions in colleges were first be-
made, bid two clubs. gun in Eastern universities, where
_.Jis partner.bid. five spades, Her- th exiSt t Prieton,,,YaleHai-
Bert went to seven clubs, and his vard, Pennsylvania, Virginia,' Wes-
partner, fearing the void in clubs leyan, Amherst and Williams. The
in his hand, bid seven- spades. The officers hope to obtain a higher
opponents doubled and set the de- membership enrollment in their
clarers four tricks. As the side was first month's drive than exists at
vulnerable, the penalty was 1,400 any of these schools.
points as against the 1,790 bonus Interest in the group is expected
if the hand had been played in to be considerably strengthen d due
clubs. to the forcast of a debate on )rohi-
The probability of 13 cards of the bition in the first- regular sessions
same suit showing up in one hand of the next Congress.
is one in many billion. According
to the Bridge World, if eight bil-
lion people played fifty hands a N6TYBEASE T
day, this would happen about once IN 6 TO 0 UPSET
a year. It occurs more often, how-
ever, because cards often stick to- Touchdown in Last Period Gives
gether in shuffling, the magazine Middies Surprise Victory.
stated. MdrsSrrs itr.
PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 5. -(P)_
Navy's surprising midshipmen, after
enduring rough treatment the great-
er part of the season, rose up in
new found power before 65,000 spec-
tators here today to administer a
_6 to 0 beating to a vastly favored
University of Pennsylvania eleven.
Workers Hope to Get Remaining They fought back the Quakers'
$4,000 by New Plan of One best efforts for three quarters of
Dollar a Month. today's tussle, and then, with only
six minutes remaining to play, the
A new plan whereby less prosper- Navy struck once and decisively
ous givers may join in raising the through the air to score their first
$4,000 by which the Ann Arbor victory of the year over a major
Community fund still falls short of opponent.
its oal as anouced esteday Bullet Lou" Kin, the Tar's fiery
by gol .Rale ghNesonyesterdai little halfback, fired the shot that
man of the campaignn sunk the Red and Blue machine.
One dollar per month for the next
five months during which the need Sophomores to Hold
will be greatest is the plan which State Caucus Monday
campaign workers hope will appeal___
to those who have not been able to "Peko" Bursley and his cohorts in
contribute in larger amounts. the Sophomore State street party
"A dollar a month means only are already planning their political
three and one-third cents a dv c r

" y ampignfor next year. Bursley
Professor Nelson said, and I appeal announced yesterday that his party
to every man or woman who knows would hold a caucus at 3:30 o'clock
or can imagine what absolute want tomorrow, in the Theta Delta Chi
,means and who himself has a job fraternity house.
which will support his needs to join At this time, Herman Everhardus,
us in this last effort.".
"While the committee has never class president, will announce the
appealed to students, there has committee appointments. The cam-
been a great deal of interest already paign officials for next year will
manifest on the part of students also be elected. -
and the association would welcome When asked if he would continue
their co-operation in the new plan his policy of throwing caucuses
starting this week," Professor Nel- open to the public, Bursley said,
son concluded. "Of course. Everybody is welcome."
Engineers Will Hold
YLFTR DAY jfDinner Next Tuesday
The student branch of the Amer-
ican Society of Mechanical Engi-
nePr will hold its annnal studentI

.. e}. ..f" lA LI". U L 'UI 11U 1U 1 1
STrojans Jan.*
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 5.-(P)-Tu 0
ane university and the University 1 n 1 * 3 f 3 I

NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 5.-(iP)-
Tulane's Green Wave jerked its
football banner to the top of the
mast and stepped on national
championship soil here today by
defeating the Washington S t a te
Cougars, 28 to 14. The crowd of 25,-
000 Tulane rooters got the fright
of their lives when the visitors
drove over a touchdown in three
minutes after the starter's whistle
The score was squared soor, how-
ever, after Capt. Jerry Dalrymple;
had left the sideline bench and took
his post at right end. He rallied
his team and five minutes later Tu-
lane went over the goal line, mak-
ing the score, 7-7.
In the second quarter, the Green
Wave rang up two more touch-
downs, but in the third quarter,
Washington State scored again,
making the score 21 to 14.
In the last quarter, Capt. Dalrym-
ple made his team safe by catch-
ing Zimmerman's pass from the 25-
yard line as he stood behind Wash-
ington State's goal line.
Score by quarters:
Tulane ......... 7 14 0 '7-28
Wash. State .... '7 0 '7 0--14

ys

of Southern California will meet
in the Rose Bowl at Pasadena, Cal.,
New Year's Day.
Willis O. Hunter, director of ath-
letics at Southern California, an-
nounced tonight he had extended
the invitation by long distance
telephone to Dr. Wilbert C. Smith,
athletic director for Tulane, who
accepted.
The invitation was delayed u4til
the result of the Tulane-Washing-
ton State game today was learned,
Hunter said. The Green Wave's 28-
14 victory gave it a clean record
of no ties and no defeats during the
season.

Four Games Are Scheduled With
Ohio State University.
CHICAGO, Dec. 5,-(1P)--?4 chi-
gan's Big Ten baseball schedule,
cut to 10 games from the usual 12,
has a new departure in four games
with Ohio State. Single games are
played with Purdue and Iowa, and
home games with Chicago and Illi-
nois. The schedule:
April 23, Illinois at Michigan;
May e6, Michigan at Iowa; May 7,
Michigan at Chicago; May 13 and
14, Ohio State at Michigan; May 20,
Michigan at Purdue; May 21, Mich-
igan at Illinois; May 28, Chicago
at Michigan; May 30 and 31, Mich-
igan at Ohio State.
Yale Defeats Brown
in Round Robin Games
NEW HAVEN, Dec. 5. -(R)--Yale
won the first round-robin football
tournament in the history of East-
ern competition today, defeating
Brown by -decision of a committee
of judges after playing through two
12-minute halves without a score in
the final game.
Yale scored the only touchdown
in the three abbreviated contests
in defeating Holy Cross, 6 to 0, to
qualify for the final. Brown won
the judges' decision to qualify for
the finals of the tournament for the
unemployed after a scoreless game
with Dartmouth in the second pre-
liminary.

OSWALD GARRISON VILLARD, NOTED
JOURNALIST, SPEAKS HERE TODAY
Oswald Garrison Villard, editor North and South of Civil War days.
of the Nation, nationally known Villard was appointed assistant
liberal weekly, will speak at two in United States history at Har-
leraleeklyi will speak atutwovard in 1894. He worked as a re-
,o'clock this afternoon in Natural porter on the staff of the Philadel-
Science auditorium. His topic will phia Press from 1896 to 1897, at
be "Militaristic Uncle Sam?" The which time he became president
lecture is under the auspices of and editorial director of the New
the Social Science club. An admis- York Evening Post, holding that
sion price of twenty-five cents will position until 1918. In 1918, he as-
be charged.. sumed the position of editor and
Villard has long been acclaimed owner of the Nation, where he is
as a champion of liberal principles, today.
He is a grandson of William Lloyd Villard is also editor of the Na-
Garrison, the great abolitionist. He utical Gazette, president of the
was born in Wiesbaden, Germany Fort Montgomery I r o n company
in 1872. He received his 'Bachelor and chairman of the board of di-
of Arts degree from Harvard in rectors of the Dobbs Ferry hospi-
1893 and his Master's degree in tal.
1896. Among his literary works are
In 1906, he was presented the de- "John Brown, a Biographv 50 Years

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