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November 25, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I?

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STHEypMyICHIGA~N DAILY WqDNE

AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
lication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
he University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant, to
President until 3:30; 11:30 a. m. Saturday.'

MODERN MACHINERY HAS NO PLACE
IN BATTLE AGAINST FOREST FIRES

. XLII.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1931

No. 511

"Machines do not play an im-
portant part in new methods of
fire fighting, except in cases of
transportation and construction of
roads to make country more ac-
cesable," said Shirley W. Allen, of
the forestry a n d conservation
school.
"Popular imagination pictures
aeroplanes flying low over fires, di-
recting control - forces, dropping
supplies, and even releasing ex-
tinguishing chemicals. The real
picture shows aeroplanes u s e d

sparingly for reconnoitering, trans-
porting men and supplies, and pa-
trol during hazy weather. In every
instance the use of aeroplanes is
auxiliary to the ponderous ground
forces."
"Men, teams, and plows, are used
in place of tractors to construct
back-fire lines. Motor pumping
units are employed in well water-
ed country. Radio is not used, the
old field telephone taking care of
communication. Strings of pack
mules penetrate the back country.

NOTICES

Ad Faculty: Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 26, is a holiday. All
cises will proceed as usual on Friday, Nov. 27, without
Alexander G. Ruthven.

on

To the Members of the University Senate: There will be a meeting
1e University Senate on Monday, Nov. 30, at 4:15 in Room "C", Law
ling. The Senate consists of the Professors, Associate Professors,
tant Professors and others specially designated by the Regent.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary.
Pre-Medical Students- The Association of American Medical Col-
Committee on Aptitude Tests recommends that any student apply-
for entrance by September, 1932, to a medical school should take the
tuck Test. This test is now a normal requirement for admission
cactically all medical schools. It is expected that all applicants for
ission to the University of Michigan Medical School will take this
A fee of one dollar is charged to defray the expenses of the Coin-
ee. Application for taking this test should be made at the Registrar's
e, Room 4, University Hall, as soon as possible-not later than Dec.
irther information about this examination may be obtained from
Registrar's Office. Ira M. Smith, Registrar.
EHnuseheads, Social Directors, Chaperons, University Women: Hours
Thanksgiving Week: The closing hour for Wednesday, Nov. 25, is
a. m.; for Thursday, Nov. 26, is 11 p. m. Overnight privileges for
nesday night may br; arranged with Househeads. Any other over-
t privileges or late r.eturns should be registered in the Office of the
a of Women. This office does not, however, excuse anyone from
es. Alice C. Lloyd, Dean of -Women.
Van Hellenic Ball Regulations: The closing hours for girls attending
Pan Hellenic Ball is 2 a. in., unless they are having breakfast follow-
he Ball in which case the closing hour is 3 a. m.
Graduate School: Students enrolled in the Graduate School will not
ermitted to drop courses after Thanksgiving. A course is not offi-
y dropped until it is reported in the office of the Graduate School,
Angell Hall. G. Carl Huber, Dean.
Students, School of Education: Permission to drop courses without
grades will not be given after today, except under extraordinary cir-
stances. No course is considered officially dropped unless it has
reported in the office of the Recorder of the School of Education,
n 1437 U. Elementary School.
School of Music Students: No classes may be dropped after Satur-
Nov. 28. Any class dropped after that date will be recorded with
ide of "E".
Students, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts: Except under
iordinary circumstances, courses dropped after Nov. 26 will be re-
ed with the grade of E.
Geology I: Pledse note the Geology bulletin board for the list of
ents who h ve missed field trips, and those who owe for the 'ex-
ons.
Hechanical Engineering Seniors: All men expecting to graduate in
please sign the list on the bulletin board near Room 221 West
neering building, indicating whether you expect to graduate in
uary, June, or August.

students in astronomy, physics, and mathematics.
EXHIBITIONS
\An Exhibition of the work of local artists is now being held on the
second floor of Alumni Memorial Hall, to be open through Nov. 26, under
the auspices of the Ann Arbor Art Association.
A number of original drawings by Louis H. Sullivan, architect, litho-
graphs and etchings by A group of artists, including Samuel Chaniber-
.lain, Louis Rosenberg, Alfred Hutty and Otto Eggers are hung in the
ground fiqor corridor cases, Architectural building, daily from 9 to 5 this
week. Public is cordially invited.
MEETINGS TODAY
Romance Languages Journal Club meets at 4:10 p. m., in Room 408
Romance Languages building. It will be addressed by Professors Mc-
Laughlin and Rovillain.
Chemical Engineering Seminar: Mr. George Holbrook will be the
speaker at the/ Seminar at 4 o'clock in Room 3201 East Engineering
building on the subject, "Entrainment in Distillation Columns."
Student Socialist.Club: Meeting at 7:30 p. in., in Room 302 Michigan
Union. Differences of opinion invited.
sophomore Cabaret: The Tango Group meets at 3 p. in., the Empress
Eugenie Group at 4 p. m., the Chess Group I at 4:30 p. in., the Moderns
and the Michigan Band at 5 p.in., at Barbour gymnasium. The Uke
Chorus meets at 4 p. in., at the League.
Wesley Hall: Dr. Fisher will meet students in a fireside discussion
group at four o'clock. .
Philippine-Michigan Club will contribute a number o the program
in connection with the International Thanksgiving Banquet this eve-
ning, at the Michigan League.
COMING EVENTS
Mathematics Classes (Mr. Baten's), will not meet Friday, Nov. 27.
St. Andrew's Church: There will be a Thanksgiving Day service on

(FISHER COMPAES
CANOHI. TOLSTOY,
Socialistic Doctrines of Three
Leaders Discussed byk
Pastor.
DESCRIBES MARX POWER
Pacifism of Indian Nationalist
Exponent Will Be More
Successful.
Comparing the socialistic theor-
ies of Gandhi, Lenin, and Tolstoy,
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, in a lecture
yesterday, expressed the opinion
that the pacifistic attempts on the
part of the Indian .leader would
probably be more successful than
the socialistic plans of the Rus-
sians.
Gandhi, according to Dr. Fisher,
was influenced to some extent by
Tolstoy's theories, and is, in a way,
carrying them out in a modified
form.
Tolstoy A. Revolutionist.
"Tolstoy," Dr. Fisher said, "was a
revolutionist by nature but feared
violence as the sure result of or-
ganized resentment. He saw the
evil and injustice of the times but
sought a resistance that would not
bring war and violence."
."Lenin," Dr. Fisher pointed out,
"approached the problem from an
economic analysis. He was a pro-
found studenterather than a mys-
tic. His real master was Karl
Marx."
Lenin's atheistic beliefs were ex-
pressed in his socialism. In his op-
position to the church he expressed
the opinion that when a man be-
lieves in God his individualism is
fostered, and he feels himself aloof
and independent. This is what the
Russian wanted to rid the people
of, and hence favored the abolition
of the church.

Choose Junior Law
Class Committeemen
Appointments for the Junior
class of the Law School were an-j
nounced last night by David W.
Wheeler, jr., presideht. They are as
follows:
Advisory: George S. Downey, as
chairman; George L. Gisler, vice-
chairman; Howard C. Peterson,
Stewart A. Pearce, and Oliver 0.
Claggett.
General Arrangements: J. Leo.
Warren, chairman; Raymond A.
Letton, vice-chairman; Emmett A.
Boyle, Henry J. Scott, George N.

Harrison, and' Dalton Seymour.
Social: Marion D. Ward, chair-
man; Lyle C. Pleshek, vice-chair-
man; David E. Hasemeier, Alfred
C. Stoddard, John Hinchman and
Charles Bishop.
Publicity: Anthony 4. Vermeu-
len, chairman; Albert A. Mathers,
vice-chairman; Henry Y. Morrison,
Ernest O'Brien, and Hartley La-
Chappelle.
Financial: Harold L. Passaman,
chairman; John B. Countryman,
vice-chairman; Charles E. Jones,
John Cashin, and Morris Alexan-
der.

Better phone' 4434 and

arrange to,

h a v e you.r Michiganensian a n d
Christmas Photographs made.

619 East Liberty Street

Thanksgiving Day Football
FERRY FIELD, 2:00 R. M.
Ann Arbor High vs. Jackson

Thursday morning at 101:0 o'clock.
The offering at that service will be
devoted to the Rector's Discretion-
ary Fund. The Red. Duncan E.
Mann will preach'at that time.
Chinese Students' Club: Impor-
tant business meeting Thursday
(Thanksgiving Day), 8 p. m., at the
Lane .Hall auditorium. Meeting is
contest.
Chinese Students' Club: Group
pictures may be inspected and or-
dered at the business meeting on
Thursday.

- _ __

RI

ical Tea will be omitted
of-Professor df Sitter's
ho Tau: Regular Wed-
ting of Sigma Rho Tau
5, has been adjourned
of Thanksgiving recess.
le meeting and the re-
liminary intercircie de-
e held at call of circle
Earl C. Briggs, Pres.
NCERT TODAY
Organ Recital 'by Mr. E.
y, Instructor in Organ,
Dol of Music at 4:15 in
ium to which the gen-
with the exception of
'en is invited.
CTURE TODAY
rLecture: 4:15 p. m., in
ence aud. Dr. Willem de
ctor of the Observatoi'y
Holland: "Modern Views
Structure of the Uni-
a Discussion of Relativ-
f Universe." A technical
ticularly for advanced

Drastic Reductions

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