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September 29, 1931 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-09-29

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CAS DAILY

I

-£ CA--DAILY

MICHIGAN'S

GREA EST

CONCERT

SERIES

S

TEN

ALL-STAR

CONCERTS

JOHN
McCORMACK

.CONCERT SCHEDULE.55.
HILL AUDITORIUM
ALL CONCERTS BEGIN AT 8:15 EASTERN STANDARD TIME

ROSA
PONSELLE

John McCormack, the charming
Irish tenor who will inagurate this
season's Choral Unionrseriesvhas
been heard in Ann Arbor several
times. More than a full student gen-
eration, however, has elapsed since
he paid his last visit to the Univer-
sity, a sort of interregnum during
which time he was either out of the
country or engaged in the "talkies."
Irish to the core, with a quick sensi-
tive temperament, possessing a "voice
of a century" he has become the idol
of music lovers everywhere, and his
concerts wherever they take place
stand out prominently among the
season's most .delightful and worthy
events.
Wednesday, October 21

First Concert

Wednesday, October 21
Johnd Mernack
Renowned Irish Singer of Songs

Rosa Ponselle "won her spurs"
during the operatic season of 1918-
1919, when almost over night she
stepped to the rostrum of the Met-
ropolitan Opera House and "took
the audience by storm." Operator
recital have no terrors for her. Her
brilliant artistry, intelligence, and
general understanding of the "eter-
nal fitness of things" in the' artistic
world has given her an assurance and
poise which always make her ap-
pearances tremendously successful.
Monday, March 7

Second Concert

Tuesday, October 27

BostonKSymphony Orlchstr
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor

"i

a

Third Concert

Tuesday, November 17
Ossip Gabrilowitsel
Distinguished Virtuoso in Piano Recital

BOSTON
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor
The Boston Symphony Orchestra
was last heard in Ann Arbor about
a decade and a half ago. A heavy
schedule of performances in its home
city prevent# morerthanroccasional
brief tours to other parts of -the
country. This season it will be heard
in New York, Buffalo, Ann Arbor,
Detroit, Columbus, and Pittsburgh.
At its Ann Arbor concert , its full
quota of about one hundred players
will be heard.

PERCY
GRAINGER

Fourth Concert

Thursday, December 3
The Revelers
Famous Quartette

0

Fifth Concert

Tuesday, December 15

Detroit Symphflony relestra
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor
-

Percy Grainger, piano virtuoso,
conductor, and composer has had a
happily unique \career which has
brought to him distinguished success
in this triune field. When a lad of
twelve years of age he made .his
debut in the spacious Exhibition
Building, in his native Melbourne,
before a hugehand enthusiastic audi-
ence. Since that time he' has 'always
been received with the same fervor
and 'enthusiasm, and a' most . delight-
ful artistic. glamour has enshrouded
all of his appearances. Sold-out
houses with many turned away are
general occurance - even, when he
plays in the largest auditorium.
Friday, February 19

Sixth Concert

Wednesday, January 13

Tuesday, October 27

Don Cossae Russian Chorus
Serge Jaroff, Director

DON COSSACK
RUSSIAN CHORUS
Serge Jaroff, Conductor
The Don Cossack Russian Male
Chorus made such a profound im-
pression last season that to satisfy
persistent demands of music lovers
they have been re-engaged for this
season. The organization known as
"The Singing Horsemen of the
Steppes" is made up entirely of ex-
patriated members of the former
Russian Imperial Army. They are
virtually "men without a country"
and travel on "Nansen" passports.
Their singing, whether it be the rev-
erent chorus of Tschaikowsky, the
dulcet serenade of Vannikov, the bold
and stirring tale of the Twelve Rob-
bers, or the wonderful ringing
choruses of the Don Cossacks on the
March, always move their audiences
by that thrilling timbre of tone uni-
que with Russian male voices.
Wednesday, January 13

-0

Seventh Concert

Monday, January 25
Dr. Rudolf Siegel
Appearing as guest conductor with the
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Thursday, February 4
Y ehud i Men uhi
World Renowned Boy Violinist

- - --8---

Eighth, Concert

'OSSIP
GABRI LOWI TSCH
Ossip Gabrilowitsch is a welcome
friend to Ann Arbor concert audi-
ences. This season he will come in
a dual capacity, first in recital and
later with a band of players over
whom he' presides.. His virtuosity
long ago 'established him among the
relavtiely few really dominant pian-
ists of the day, and simultaneously
he acquired'equal fame as a conduc-
tor.
Tuesday, November 17

Ninth Concert

Friday, February 19
Perc'yGrainger
Favorite Australian-American Pianist

Tenth Concert

Monday, March 7

Rosa Ponselle
Leading Soprano, Metropolitan Opera

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Ossp Gabrilowitsch, Conductor .
The Detroit Symnphcny Orchestra will be heard twice this year,
once under the baton of its own beloved conductor, Mr. Gabrilowitsch,
and later under the direction of a distinguished European director,
Dr. Rudolf Siegel, who was persuaded to come to America as guest
conductor to appear in Ann~Arbor and twice in Detroit during the
prcceeding week. Detroit has reason to be artistically happy with
its orchestra, for its creditable record under its scholarly leader has
carried the mrotor city's name to all corners of the musical world.
Tuesday, December 15

YEHUDI MENUHIN
Yehudi Menuhin, the "greatest boy violinist of the century,"
comes to Ann Arbor at the "ripe age" of fourteen or fifteen years;
after several seasons of public acclaim. Wisely, his astute managers
hav permitted only a limited number of engagements each year, and
these have been largely in th. musical capitals of Europ and in a few
of the great music centers of America. This year the Choral Union
series is included and the great' student concert audience will have
an opportunity of hearing a young lad who has already won inter-
national distinction.
Thursday, February 4
DR. RUDOLF SIEGEL, Guest Conductor and
the Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Dr. Rudolf Siegel who is to direct the Detroit Symphony Orches-
tra on one of its appearances here, was born in Munich of Bavarian
p rents in 1878. For several years he conducted the Konigsberg
Akademic orchestra, and since 1919 has been city director at Crefeld
and conductor of the Konzertverein. He is distinguished also as a
composer, having written the opera Herr Dandolo, an Apostaten-
marsch for men's voices and orchestra, as well as the orchestral, as
well as the orchestral Heroische Tondictung and various songs,
Monday, January 25

THE REVELERS

The University Musical Society feels very happy indeed in secur-
ing for this sei ts one of the most popular of male quartettes-The
Revelers. The quartette is made up of James Melton, first tenor;
I cwis James, second tenor; Phil Dewey, baritone; Wilpo Glenn, bass;
and Frank Black, director and pianist.
Thursday, December 3

DON COSSACK RUSSIAN MALE CHORUS

SCHEDULE OF TICKET PRICES

0

CHORAL UNION SEASON TICKETS
The following schedule of prices covers ad-
nissions of the ten CHORAL UNION CON-
CERTS, and in additional each season ticket
contains a "three dollar" May Festival coupon,
gocd for that amount when exchanged for a sea-
son May Festival ticket later in the year, in
accordant e with a schedule to be announced.
BLOCK "A"-All tickets in the three center
sections on the Main Floor (Sections 2, 3, 4)
and in the three center sections (Sections 7, 8,
g) in the first balcony, $12.oo. (These $12.00

tickets are designated, "+Patrons" Tickets and
automatically carry the privilege of retaining the
same seat location for the May Festival upon
payment of five dollars additional later in the
year.)
BLOCK "$"-All tickets in the two side sec-
tions (Sections ' and 5) on the Main Floor and
in the two side sections (Sections 6 and io)
of the first balcony, $1o.oo each.
BLOCK "C"-All tickets in the first eight
rows in the second balcony, $8.oo. each.
BLOCK "D"-All tickets back of the first
eight rows in the second balcony, $6.oo each.

PATRON'S PRIVILEGES
Subscribers of record to Patrons' Tickets are
entitled to the same seat locations that they had
at the last May Festival, PROVIDED their
orders were received NOT LATER than Septem-
ber i, on blanks specially mailed to such sub-
scribers.
GENERAL ORDERS
All other orders will be filed in sequence and
filled in the same order, except that orders re-
ceived prior to September i will be considered
as of that date. Tickets will be mailed out

about October 1o, at purchasers' risks, unless
additional fee of 17c is enclosed to cover registra-
tion.
If the seats in any division become exhausted,
remaining orders will be filled from the succeed-
ing divisions, and a corresponding adjustment in
finances will be made.
Beginning Monday, October me, if any season
tickets remain unsold, they will 'be broken up
for individual concerts as' follows: Main Floor,
$2.50; First Balcony, $a,o9; Sectnd Balcony,
front, $x.5o; Second Balcony, rear, $r.oo.
No responsibility will be assumed for errors

made in connection with orders written illegibly
or inaccurately, or in connection with telephone
conversations, or for tickets lost, stolen or de-
stroyed. The right is also reserved to make such
changes in the personnel of artists or dates an-
nounced as necessity may require, and no re-
funds will be made because of any such changes.
Remittance should be made payable to the Uni-
versity Musical Society, and mailed to
CHARLES A. SINK
President, School of Music
Ann Arbor, Michigan

'

CONCERTS ARE MAINTAINED BY

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