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October 30, 1931 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-30

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PAGE SIX

THE MTCHTGAN

DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1931

PAG1~ SIX THE MICHIGAN FRIDAY. OCTOBER 30. 1931

_, _ _

DAILY OFFICIAL BU2LLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to
the President until 3:30; 11:30 a. in. Saturday.
VOL. XLII. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1931 No. 29
NOTICES
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be at home from 4 to 6 o'clock on
th1e first two Sunday afternoons of each month to members of the
faculties, their friends, and other residents of Ann Arbor.
Palyi Lecture Postponed: The lecture by Dr. Melchior Palyi on
"Germany After the Panic," which was to be given on Nov. 4, is indefi-
nitely postponed. Work connected with German financial problems is
recalling him to New York earlier than had been anticipated.
To the Members of the University Council: The next meeting of the
Council will be held on Monday, Nov. 9 at 4:15 p. in., in Alumni Memorial
Hall, Room "B". Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary.
Faculty, School of Education: There will be a meeting of the Faculty
at the Michigan League building at 12 o'clock noon Monday, Nov. 2.
Members of the Faculty and Graduate Students of the School oi
Education: There will be a luncheon at the Michigan League, Saturday,
Oct. 31, at 1:15. Professor S. A. Courtis will talk on European schools.
Wives and husbands are invited. Those who have not signed for places
phone Miss Hall, 23491, for reservations before 5 p. m. today.
English I (Sec. 12) 63 and 87: Professor Walter will not meet these
classes today.
R. O. T. C. Uniforms: To receive new uniforms, students should see
tailors at R. 0. T. C. office Monday, Nov. 2, from 1 to 5 p. in., or Tuesday,
Nov. 3, between 8 a. in. and 5 p. m.
Math 49, 50, 52: All students in these three courses are to report to;
Room 220 Angell Hall for appointment in Tabulating instruction from
10 a. in. to 5 p. in., Nov. 2 to 6, inclusive. Alan D. Meacham.
MEETINGS TODAY
Graduate Students in Chemistry: Qualifying and preliminary exam-
inations in analytical chemistry for graduate students working toward1
the Doctor's degree in chemistry will be held at 1 p. in., in Room 151 of
the ,Chemistry building.
Lutheran Students: Hallowe'en party for Lutheran students at the
Zion Parish Hall, 309 E. Washington St., at 8 p. in. Guests are requested
to wear old clothes.
Chess and Checker Club will play against the Ypsilanti Checker Club1
at 7:30 this evening in the Lobby of the Union for the team champion-
ship of Washtenaw County. All spectators welcome.

THREE GOVERNORSl
WILL BE__ELECTED
Mississippi, Kentucky and New
Jersey to Choose Chief
Executives.
(By Associated Press)
Three states - Mississippi, Ken-
t ucky and New Jersey-will elect
governors at next Tuesday's off-
year elections.
In Mississippi where Democratic
nomination is equivalent to elec-
tion, the voting will be hardly more
than a formality. Mike Conner is
the Democratic nominee. He will
take office Jan. 1.
The campaign in Kentucky has
been confined for the most part
to the administration of the state
highway department. Ruby Laffoon,
circuit judge, is the Democratic
candidate. He favors the present
partisan arrangement of the high-
way commission. Mayor William
Harrison of Louisville, heading the
Republican ticket, would return the
board to its former bi-partisan
set-up.
Huge Tax Suit Favors
Du Ponts in Delaware
WILMINGTON, Del., Oct. 29.-(A')
-Federal Judge Nields today held
in favor of the Delaware Trust Co.,
executor of the estate of William
Du Pont, in its suit for recovery of
$283,000 inheritance taxes with in-
terest.
The government sought original-
ly to collect $1,297,881, but only
about 20 per cent was paid. The
decision is expected to be appealed.
Judge Nields held unconstitu-
tional previously the section of the
Internal Revenue Act, which de-
clared any transfer of property val-
ued at $5,000 or more, made within
two years before death, to be in
contemplation of death."
The opinion today involved trans-
fers amounting to $6,433,367 to Du
Pont's son, daughter and daughter-
in-law.
The abandoned bed of the Miami
and Erie canal at Hamilton, 0., has
been turned into gardens forun-s
employed.

Capone's Bodyguard
Found Carrying 'Gat'
I ,.
Associated Press Photo
Phillip D' Andrea, bodyguard of
"Scarface Al" Capone who was
caught carrying a pistol at Capone's
trial in Chicago, threw himself on
the mercy of federal court when
arraigned on contempt charges.
Third Degree Charged
in Detroit Questioning
DETROIT, Oct. 29.-(P)-Two de-
tectives of the Canfield precinct
police station were ordered to ap-
pear before Police Superintendent
Patrick J. O'Grady today to answer
charges of using "third degree"
methods in the questioning of an
18-year-old youth last Sunday.
The complainant, Alfred Schler-
eth, charges that Detectives Joseph
Young and Marshall Wallen ar-
rested him at 1 a, m., Sunday and
took him to a room in the Canfield
station, where they beat him with
a piece of rubber hose in an effort
to get him to admit a theft which
he says he knew nothing about.

LUXURIES, SUBJECT
OF ENGINEERS TALK

65

YEARS AGO MICHIGAN WAS MOST
DEAMOCRA TIC SCHOOL, AUTHOR SAYS

Profession Will Enter Field
Wealth Distribution Says
Gwiasdowski.

of

Engineers are responsible for
many of the luxuries that we enjoy,
Prof. A. P. Gwiazdowski of the en-
gineering department said in a
radio talk yesterday afternoon over
station WJR. They have put many
conveniences within the reach of
people through mass production.
The engineer has coordinatedl
the efforts of the chemist, metal-
lurgist, physicist, mathematician,
bookkeeper, floor sweeper, and
tropical savage to create a perfect
product at the lowest possible cost,
Gwiazdowski stated.
The every day rule for the pro-
duction engineer is, "Subdivision of
operations is a function of accur-
acy," Professor Gwiazdowski said.
The subdivision of operations de-
creases the time element, and
therefore the price of the finished
product, he said.
This simple rule has mane it pos-
sible for millions of American fam-
ilies to own automobiles, radios,
telephones, w a s h i n g machines,
vacuum cleaners, oil burners, and
in the near future the same will
apply to aeroplanes.
The engineer will invade the field
of wealth distribution before long,
Professor Gwiazdowski said. "Here,
again, the engineer's sense of jus-
tice, his desire to see all humanity
well fed, well clothed and provided
with the necessities for cultural liv-
ing will produce an economic mir-
acle."
Roy Chandler, Fayette, Ala., rural
mail carrier, has traveled more than
10 times the distance around the
world in 25 years.

Statement Result of Discovery
in Journal of English
Traveller.
65 years ago the University of
Michigan was "probably the most
democratic school in the whole
world," to quote Charles Wentworth
Dilke, an English author who came
to Ann Arbor during his tour of all
English-speaking, and English-gov-
erned countries.
Discovery of this piece of jour-
nalistic praise of the University of
Michigan is due to Samuel S. Isa,
of Ann Arbor, who was examining
author.
Lauding the universities of the
a book of the travels of the English
western states over those of New
England Dilke had this to say:
"One of the difficulties of the New
England colleges has been to recon-
cile university traditions with de-
mocracy; but in the western states
there is neither reconciliation nor
tradition, though universities are
plenty. Probably the most demo-
cratic school in the whole world is
the state university of Michigan,
situated at Ann Arbor, near De-
troit. It is cheap, large, practical;
twelve hundred students, paying
only the ten dollars entrance fee,
and five dollars a year during resi-
dence-to contrast with the 8,500
enrollment and $98 tuition of 1931
-living where they can in the lit-
tle town, attend the university to
be prepared to enter with knowl-
edge and resolution upon the af-
fairs of their future life."
Stressing the simplicity of the
organization he went on with
"These things are democratic, but
it is not in them that the essential
democracy of the university is to
be seen. There are at Michigan no
honor lists, no classes in our sense,
no orders of merit, no competition.
Love of labor instead of competi-
tion in studies was the thing which
he most admired at Michigan. "It
might be supposed that these

strange departures from the sys-
tems of older universities were ir-
regularities, introduced to meet the
temporary embarrassments inci-
dental to educational establish-
ments in young states. So far is
this from being the case that, as
I saw at Cambridge, the clearsight-
ed men of the older colleges of
America are trying to assimilate
their teaching system to that of
Michigan-at least in the one point
of the absence of competition. They
assert that toil performed under
the excitement of a fierce struggle
between man and man is unheal-
thy work, different in nature and
in results from the loving labor of
men whose hearts are really in
what they do: toil, in short, not
very distinguishable from slave
labor."
He explains the reason for the
strange governing of the University
when he says, "It is explained when
we look to the source whence the
funds of the university are drawn--
namely, from the pockets of the
taxpayers of the state."
12 Year Old Killer
Given Life Sentence
ASOTIN, Wash., Oct. 29.-(IP)-
Convicted of murder, 12-year-old
Hubert Nicolls, Jr., faced life im-
prisonment in the penitentiary to-
day with a degree of happiness.
Smiling on the jury that took
two ballots to find him guilty Wed-
nesday of shooting Sheriff John
Wormell, 72, during a grocery rob-
bery Aug. 5, the frail 60-pound
school boy said:
"Well, I'm glad its over and I'm
happy they didn't send me to an
insane asylum, for even smart men
go nuts in a mad house."
Superior Judge E. V. Kuykendall
ordered the boy returned to the
courtroom today to hear the -life
sentence pronounced. It was made
mandatory by the verdict.

UNIVERSITY PLANNING TO PRESENT
RADIO LECTURES FOR HIGH SCHOOLS

All Students of Hellenic Descent are invited to attend the regular
meeting of the Hellenic Society at the Michigan Union, at 8 p. m. This
meeting will afford an opportunity for Greek students to meet their
fellow countrymen, who are enrolled in the University.
The Youngstown Michigan Club will meet this evening at 7:30 p. m.,
in Room 302 of the Union. Youngstown men please be there.
Sophomore Cabaret: Tryouts will be held today in the League from
3 to 6, the room to be announced on the bulletin board. For further
information call Phyllis Swift, 7117.
The Sigma Delta Chi luncheon has been postponed. A meeting of
all members will be held, however, in a private room at the Union, at 4
p. m., with Ralph Peters, editor of the Quill and substitute for Mr. Mapel.
COMING EVENTS
University Lecture: Sir Thomas Lewis, F. R. S., of the University
College Hospital Medical School, London, England, will lecture on the
subject "The Pain of Intermittent Claudication" (illustrated), Monday,
November 2, at 3 p. m., in the Hospital Amphitheatre. The public is
cordially invited.
A. I. E. E.: Mr. Carl J. Fechheimer will speak at 11 a. m., Saturday,
Oct. 31, in Room 248 West Engineering building. Mr. Fechheimer is a
well known authority on cooling of electrical machinery, and has done
outstanding work on turbines for the Westinghouse Manufacturing Co.
All persons interested are invited.

Monday Evening Drama Section
of the Faculty Women's Club will
hold it4 first meeting, Monday, Nov.
2, at 7:45 p. m., Michigan League.
Woman's Research Club: Meeting
Monday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p. in., in.
Room 3024 Museum building. Miss
Catherine Magee will speak on
"Some Chemical Changes in the
Spinal Fluid in Meningitis and
Poliomyelitis."
Hindustan Club will meet in Lane
Hall on Sunday at 2 p. in.
Cosmopolitan Club: Don't forget
the Hallowe'en hike and party on
Saturday. Meet at Lane Hall at 3:15
p. in. A nominal charge will be
made to cover picnic supper.
Sunday evening, Liberal Student's
Union, Professor Leslie A. White will
discuss "Evolution-From Ape to
Man" at 7:30 at the Unitarian
Church. Refreshments and dancing.
~ ~

f
i
i
t
1
t
t

137 Michigan Schools Reply j
to Circular Letter Asking
for Speech Ideas.
The University broadcasting serv-
ice has received requests from 137
Michigan high schools asking for
special programs, Prof. Waldo Ab-
bot, director of broadcasting serv-
ice, stated yesterday.
A circular letter was sent in Sep-
tember to all high school principals
in the state offering to broadcast
direct to high school classes. In
the replies, subjects requested vary
from readings from the works of
Robert Burns to a talk on aviation.
The speeches chosen will comply
with the requests of the high
schools, Prof. Abbot stated, but
will be written so that they will ap-
peal to the general radio audience.
Each talk will be introduced with
the name of the teacher and high
school making the request, and
whenever possible individual stu-
dents in the listening class will be'

addressed.
Recent experience has shown
that those talks whichhend with a
for reading list are satisfied by
in the subject discussed create the
greatest interest. These requests
for reading lists are satisfied by
Miss Edith Thomas of the Univer-
sity library.
The Broadcasting Service mailed
cards to every member of the Uni-
versity faculty, in September, ask-
ing for a list of available topics. A
favorable number of replies were
received, but because of the un-
usual demand those members of
the faculty who have not returned
these cards with suggested subjects
are requested to do so at once.
The Speech Week Programs
which start Nov. 9 have aroused
much interest among the high
schools. Registrar Ira Smith is ar-
ranging a series of talks addressed
to high school seniors for the week
starting Nov. 30 and other depart-
mental weeks will be scheduled
later.

Buick Taxi Service
25C
ANYWHERE IN ANN ARBOR
ONE OR FIVE PASSENGERS
Phone 9504 or 2-1550

Now Is Pork Sausage Time....
Include some in your next order. Bulk or Little
Breakfast Sausages, made fresh daily.
Monarch Coffee, 2 lbs..............65c
Kraft Cheese, %2 lb. pkgs., 2 for .......35c
Eschelbach Market
202 East Huron Phone 4159
Ann Arbor's Leading Meat Market

1.

.d

U

I

Theta Sigma Phi meeting Satur-
day at 1 p. m., in League building.

I

SAND

KIL LINS GRAVEL
COMPANY
Telephone 711 2

It Pays to Buy
Men's Clothing
at HA GEN'S

The problem of where to eat vitally concerns every one
who is not living at home. At Freeman's you will find
served only the most wholesome foods-a trial will con-
vince you.
Lunch and Dinner (per week). .$5.50
Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner
(per week) ................ $7.00
Sunday Dinner .................75c
F REMAN'S

DINE AND DANCE

Why Not?

iii

AT

Joe Parker's

I

DINING ROOM
809 East Washington
ONE BLOCK NORTH OF HILL AUDITORIUM

C AFE

Cor. Huron St. and Fourth Ave.
NOW UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Dancing-Wednesday, Thursday,
Saturday and Sunday

Friday,

NO

I

Make up your Party for the
Big Hallowe'en Dance

Saturday,

Oct. 31

-

GIFT

A BIG TIME FOR ALL

t,

BILL'S SIX PIECE

Conveys your message of love, of
cheer as do flowers. Our stock of
cut flowers and potted plants is
always complete . . . your order will

ORCHESTR A

4..

11

1111 fl.'lr pur%.,® N, 1'9 "Ve ;a Q??Jq 11

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