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October 17, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-17

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SATURDAY,

dished evermorning except Monday during the Universi year
13 ard vi ontrol of Student Publications.
nber of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
tion of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
3 in this paper and the local news published herein.
ered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
natter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
ster General,~
scription by carrier, $4.00; .br mail, $4.50
ces: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
n. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBIN
d'tor ...... . ..............David M. Nichol
I Director................ ...... .Beach Conger, Jr.
itor ...................................Carl Forsythe
Editor .............................Sheldon C. Fullerton
's Editor .......... ............ ...Margaret AL Thompson
Reflections.........................Bertram J. Askwith
it News Editor..........................Robert L. Pierce
NIGHT EDITORS
B. Gilbreth J. ullen Kennedy James Inglis
Goodman Denton 0. Kunze Jerry E. Rosenthal
Karl Seifbert George A. Stauter

severance of diplomatic negotiations between the
two countries might, if nothing is soon accomplish-
ed, lead to just that end. The primary motive of
the League in intervening in the Mafichurian con-
troversy is, of course, to avert war. Of secondary
but of equal importance is an extreme fear lest
the integrities of treaties be impaired, and the
right ezpressed in the Covenant of the League to
intervene and avert war by peaceful means when-
ever possible.
It is doubtful if Japan and China want war;
yet they are opposed to any settling of the disputej
other than among themselves. They would con-
sider it a domestic problem, not one of interna-
tional scope. But this in reality is what it has
become and it is time to carry out the Kellog-
Briand pact and the Covenant of the League.
Under the Kellog-Briand pact, both Japan and
China renounced war as an instrument of national
policy. There is also the nine-power Pacific treaty
which pledged them to arbitrate disputes. If the
League, together with its member nations, cannot
prove its usefulness, it has partly failed of its pur-
pose. If the Kellog-Brignd pact, of which Japan
and China were both signatories, fails as a remedy,
then that treaty is worth nothing more than a
scrap of paper.,
But with these powerful forces cooperating,
there is every hope that the League will succeed in
its duty. The American government, determined
to do its utmost for the preservation of peace, is
ready to ignore Japanese protests and accept the
invitation of the League to prevent war. The fact
that the United States is willing to participate in
negotiations is -an indication that we are a peace-
loving naion. Once Japan thorouighly understands
the American position, it is believed the govern-
ment at Tokio will withdraw its objection and
accede to the arbitration of disputes by legal agen-
cies.

I

~ ,,, ., ~ .--~ -,,,,.

OASTED MESSAGE
FROM THE
D FA D! ! I

SPECIA
EXTRA PANTS
Suit .
SuitG.........
All tGuaranteedv
£NIIX A 0 TCl Ii

Sports Assistants
J. Myers Jahn W. Thomas
nMb
REPORTERS
Arnheim James Krotozyner
gley Norman F. Kraft
E. Becker Robert Merritt
Connellan fienry Meyer
. Cooper Marion Milezewski
U. Harrison Alert Newman
helper> Jerome Pettit
ooan JhnPritchard
e Woodhams Beatrice Collins
Cummings Ethel Arehart
Brockman Barbara Hasl
adsworth Susan Manhester
Thomson Margaret; O'Brien
G~sman Louise Crandall

John S. Townsend
Charles A. Sanford
Joseph Renihan
Alfred Strewn-Reuter
William Thal
G. R. Winters
Charles Woolner
Brackley Shaw
Nord Spikerman
Parker Snyder
Cile Miller
Elsie Feldman
Eileen Blunt
Eleanor Rairdon
Martha Littleton
Prudence Foster

BUSINESS STAFF,
Telephone 21214

ES T KLINE ...............Business Manager
P. JHNSON.............. .....Assistant Manager
Department Managers
ing ................................Vernon Bishop
Sing............... ..... .Robert B. Callahan,
ping ...:........................William W. Davis
....................... Byron C. Vedder
tiona .... ... ... ..............William' T. Brown
ion ..............Harry R. Begley
...................Richard Stratemeier
s Business Manager.....................Ann W. Verner
Assistants
ronsen Willard Freehling Thomas Roberts
E, Bursley Herbert Greenstone R. A. Saltzstein
A. Combs John Keyser Bernard E. Schnacke
~lark Artbur F. Kohn Grafton W. Sbarp
Dalberg Bernard H. Good '>Cecil E. Welch
E. Finn James Lowe
Bayless Ann Gallmeyerar Helen Olsen
Becker Ann Marsha Marjorie Rough
re Field Kathryn Jackson Mary E. Watts
Fischgrund Dorothy Laylin .
NIGHT EDITOR-JAMES INGLIS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1931

Styles of
ity Football

ASTERN colleges, urged on by the national
unemployment comnittee of President Hoov-
',have agreed to stage a football rodeo to take
:e in New Haven and New York. Each game
l'be for 20 minutes and an active day of football
aes is plarnned for the spectator.
In the meanwhile, Big Ten officials, upon being
roached on the same subject, are withholding
r opinion on the matter. Since charity games
re 'already approved of earlier this fall, to take
:e after the regular conference season, it is
ally probable that a plan similar to that in the
st might be adopted.
Such a manner of conducting football games for
rity might simplify matters in numbers. Yet
do not believe it would be as reiunerative, as
as the charity side is concerned. Under the'
Ten system, the charity games will undoubted-'
>e used to decide thie championship, in as much
it appears that 'several teams vil tie for first
ce. Under the Eastern system, this would be
>ossible. Twenty minutes of football would not
out the players so much, yet if it were a ques-
n of demonstrating clearly a superior brand of
tball, 20 minutes could not decide the matter
harply as a regular football game could. There
uld .be alibis from the rooters of the losing team.
As for the financial side, games in five differ-
large stadia would certainly attract greater
wd than any number of games in two stadia.
st Big Ten colleges are situated near large
es, and the conference officials would certainly
ange a schedule that would attract the largest
wds. A championship game in the Michigan
:lium, a semichampionship game in the Ohio
te or Northwestern stadium would certainly
ract a large number of customers. Nor are the
er stadia in the Big Ten exactly what one
1Ld call "small."
All in all, although the plan adopted by the
stern colleges is praiseworthy, we do not believe
vould be a success in the Big Ten. It is a ques-
n of straight football versus abbreviated, thea-
:al football. If the championship of the middle
st, perhaps of the nation, is to be decided in a
rity game, why not make it a full game and
e the spectators their money's worth?

EDITOIAL COMMENT
(The Pennsylvanian.)
With the commencement of each academic year,
the problem of class dues comes to the fore. Slogans
are bandied back and forth between the various fac-
tions within a class in an effort to arouse the student
body into action. Sometimes this method is success-
ful to the extent that the student out of sheer bore-
dom from being "pestered" with demands upon his
class loyalty, and other phrases which are apparently
quite meaningless to him, finally pays his dues.
Such acondition is lamentable; it indicates a
lassitude which is certainly not in keeping with the
attitude that should be shown by students at an
institution of higher learning. A college and its cam-
pus is a little world of its own, and the habits we
form and the interest we display in a variety of sub-
jects will undoubtedly remain with us after grad-
uation. Perhaps the lack of interest we, show in
politics as mature men and women may, in the final
analysis, be traced to our attitude toward them while
in college.
The age-old query, "What do I get out of it?" may
be heard wherever the politically minded gather.
Self-aggrandizement seems to be the only excuse for
participation, and unless this is forthcoming no sup-x
port is guaranteed. No thought is given to the factL
that the leader chosen is the representative of thet
class and his actions will be a reflection of the wis-a
dom of the class' choice.
Phrases such as "class loyalty" and "class unity"r
are hackneyed, but they wil continue in use for wantF
of better expressions. If the individual resents theira
use, then let him pay his dues and avoid needlessc
annoyance. If the individual desires to become activer
because of ulterior motives best' known to himself,e
let hin do so. If the final result is the election of .c
a capable president in the class elections which will 8
follow each other in rapid succession during the nextX
few weeks, the end justifies the means, for spirit andt
loyalty cannot be developed in a day.C
(Daily Northwestern.)
Freshmen know more than seniors. At least, that
is what a recent Carnegie foundation report declares,
going on to say that a senior loses much of the
"knowledge" he has acquired even before he receivese
his diploma. The peak of his "knowledge" in manyc
subjects is reached during his freshman year, accord-1
ing to the report. We wonder what the report means
by "knowledge." If it uses the word in the sense of
a group of isolated facts, figures, and dates the as-
sumptipn might be correct. But one can hardly call
this storing-up process "knowledge."
The senior has learned the relative unimportance
of facts. He does not try to remember every date
mentioned in his text book as 'does the freshman only
a few months out of high 'school. Rather, the senior
has acquired from college the ability to think and
reason for himself. He not only knows where he
can go to get his facts if he needs them, but he has
learned the value of reasoning out their causes and
effects. He knows how to pick the chaff from the
wheat.
The freshman does not yet know how to do this.
He still believes everything that is told him, accept-
ing without question the opinions of others, and
especially of his professors. He still has upon him
the Inmpress of the grade-school memory process of
education.
The claims of the report may be true, but if a
senior and a freshman were given an equal oppor-
tunity to solve a difficult problem in their field, we
would place our money on the senior
Down in Louisiana two rival governors have called
out armed troops to decide who should sit in the
state 'xecutive's chair. We foresee a big slump in
the Mardi Gras business.
Ancient Babylonian temples were known as "Zig-
gurates," we find. It takes a fairly robust imagination
to visualize a Babylonian prince reaching for a zig-
gurat instead of a sweet.

As we were sitting here meditat- 1319 South Univ
ing last night over who could have
perpetrated that column yesterday-
morning, a .soft glow seemed toT
permeate the office about us. A WANT ADS
rosy halo appeared over our type-
writer, and the loquid accents of.
the well-beloved deceased D A NM
BAXTER sounded flutelike in our W B
ears. He told us, poor fellow, that I N
as long as Smiley was at the helm
of the ship Molls the grave had re- D
mained a haven of peace and soli- &
tude for his weary bones; but since C jI1-
Smiley too- joined the spectral host O
dear old Dan's soul has been in
perpetual torment.
"WHAT HAS BECOME OF mums
LITTLE YVONNE FAGAN?" he
piped plaintively with a slight AND CORS
catch in his table-tappings.
"Where is the spirit of revolt for
against N E W B E R R Y AUD.? THE DAN
Who has control of the ROLLS
THREE-SPEED-IN-REVRSE- also
W ITI-A-PI N K-BORDER
WEATHER FORECASTER, and Decorations
who is there to take care of the Partes
temperamental tantrums of
tie ROLLSUnARTIST"Unversity F]
* 4 .Shop, In
Well sir, we may be old softies
and all that, but somehow the tear 606 East Liberty St. P
in DAN'S voice got us where the Open Evenings and1
hair was short and made us re- Postal Telegraph S
solve to stand upright on our own -- -- -
foursquare to the world and fight
the good life with all our might.
As our first measure of re-
form, we went right out and
made overtures to the Rolls Ar
tit.' He ntace overtures right
back at us until the place ws
sinply littered with the things
and he don't have any room to
draw in. We expect a contribu-
tion from him" any day now...
...and, by the way, where are
the contributors of yesterday?
As I think back, it seems to me
that one of the things that old
Dan's ghost told me was that FRTMT
he could never tell what any- FIRST METO
one wanted written except by EPISCOPAL CHi
their letters to him. He said
that contributions helped keep Cor. S. State and E. Was
the e o 1 u mn interesting D Fe B r
everyone. We never thought it Dr. Frederick B. Fisher
was anyway, but maybe that
was because we didn't contri- 10:30 A. M.-Morning
bute. "REWARDS
* oOF RIGHTEOUSN
SPECIAL OFFER
Still in connection with the abov 7:30 P. M.-Evening
-we have, against all our princi- "THE SOUL OF RA
pies, decided to offer anyone who MACDONALD
is base-minded enough, to reposti- Both sermons by Dr
tute their art, and work for filthy
awards. They will be filthy, too-
We promise .you that' all right all
right. In addition to ROLLS DI-
PLOMAS for the best contribution-
of the week, moreover, there will,
of course, be the usual staft ap- TlE
pointments based on number and FIRST BAPTIST0
quality of accepted contributions E. Huron, below
during the year. The exact figures . Hurn below
R. Edward Sayles, N~
are not yet compiled by the Com-
pilation Dept., but we shall be able Howard R. Chapman,
to announce just what will be re-
quired for each position very soon 9:30 A. M.-The Chu
now. Mr. Wallace Watt, Sup
* * 10:45 A. M.--Mr. Sayles
In return for any favors the Topic "Courage."
Campus rmay do us in compliance 12:00 Noon-Discussion
with the above appeals (they nev- the Guild House. Mr. (
er have managed to get around to 5:30 P.HM.-Friendshi
doing any yet, but we always have Guild House.
hopes) we'of the Rolls Staff prom- 6:30 P. M.-Mayor H
ise faithfully the following: kirk will discuss Prop
1... To print impartial lies invited.
and truth about what goes on
in the University when its
character seems to warrent
mention in this column. ,FIRST CHUR

2. .. To print nothing of any CHRIST, SCIE
possible interest to anyone.
3... To appear three times a 409 S. Division
week, which seems to be about 10:30 A. M.-Regular M
as often as we can oust those ice. Sermon topic:
lousy reviews from our sacred Atonement."
territory. 11:45 A. M.-Sunday Sc
4 ... To do just as we darn ing the morning servi
well please about everything
including the keeping of the Testimonial Meeting.
above promises.
These things we do solemnly
swear on our plighted troth
and we hope all your family The Reading Room,
are all right too.,...honest we State Savings Bank Build
d.daily from 12 to 5 o'
d*.Sundays and legal ho
The Political situation is such
that we scarcely dare touch on it
any more. It seems that the Rolls ZION LUTHERN
candidates got pretty well discour-
aged at the recent caucuses, and Washington Street anc
that alone would be enough to dis- E. C. Stellhorn,
courage most people. Nevertheless,
we stride bravely forth into the 9:00 A.M-Bible Sc]
open again with another sugges- : M
tion-namely to elect Uncle Joe 10:30 A. M.-Divine
Bursley to all the offices which he mon by Rev. M.L.
will have to run all the rest of the Detroit.

--

_ __

FRE I The Masonic
FRSEE-
$25 Temple
. ...$30
$35 is open for
to Fit
UKAS ' Dining Room
versity Service
BEFORE AND AFTER
PAY GAMES.
Good Meals
Reasonable PricedI
0 l 327 South 4th Ave.
Ann Arbor Masonic
T SUBSCIBE TO THE~

AGES
CE
sfor
lower
C.
hone 6030
Sundays
Station

75c

A CHICKE DINNER at 4
[THE CHOICEST OF WHOLESOME FOODS})

Regular Dinner 50c
j~

it

II

y

THE LIBERTY CUT
RtATE STORE
119 EAST LIBERTY ST.
Tasty Toasted Sandwiches
Fountain Service
Sodas, Sundaes, Lunches
Very Reasotable Prices
SPECIAL
Free tube of tooth paste
on any Colgate or Palm
OIive item for 50c or over.
CUT RATE ON ALL TOILET
PREPAATIONSAND DRGS
MICHIG AN DAILY

DIST
URCII
hington Sts.
, Minister
Worship.
[ESS"
Worship.
AMSAY
"
Fisher.

THE
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets
Sunday, October 18
"Personality and the Christian
Ideal"
ar
Discussion
6:00-7:30 P. M. Sunday
at
Wesley Hall
One presentation. Several groups in
a consideration of vital issues 'on
leadership. Tom Pryor '26, chair-
man.

CHURCH
State
4inister
Minister for
rch School,
erintendent.
will preach.
group at
Chapman.
p Hour at
.Wirt New-
hibition,eall
?CH
NTIST
St.
orning Serv-
"Doctrine of
chool follow-
ce.
ay Evening
10 and 11
ding, is open
clock, except
olidays.
CHURCL1
d 5th Ave.
Pastor
hoo .
Service. Ser-
Frederick ofj

BE
CONSISTENT IN
YOUR
RELIGION

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, Associate
9:30 A. M.-Class for Freshmen
meets at the Church House, 1432
Washtenaw Avenue.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The You' That Might
Be "
12:00 Noon-Class fo Upper-class-
men at the Church.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Speaker: Dr. Walter Judd,
Jr.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, October 18
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Address by Walter H. Judd, M.D.,
late of Shaowu, China, Subject:
"China in the Present Crisis."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship
Social Hour with supper followed
at 6:30 by an, address on "Ethics
in Modern Pusiness Cby Ray Mor-
ton Hardy of the Crowley-Milner
Personnel Department.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Cor. East University Ave. & Oakland
Rabbi Bernard Heller, Director
Philip Bernstein, Assistant to the
Director
Sunday, October 18
11:15 A. M-Services in the Chaptel
of the Women's League Building.
Rabbi Heller will speak on "Gen-
uine' and Spurious Individuality."
7:30 P. M.-Open Forum. David
L. Netzorg of Manilla, Philippines,
will speak on "Jewish Life in the
Orient."
Conservative services each Friday
evening 7:00 P. M. at the Founda-
tion.

1

e
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

[1 The League
Nations Meet the Test?

HHE life of the League of Nations has been,
threatened. Its continuance as an instrument
maintain peace throughout the civilized world
gs in the balance. Success would give it addi-
ial momentum; failure would probably mean its
>andment. With this in mind, the council of
League is prepared to participate in its effort
>revent a war in the Orient. To fulfill its duty,
M. Briand, the French foreign minister charac-
zes it, the League has invited the principal

THE "UPPER ROOM"
BIBLE CLASS'
For all "Michigan" Men. The
Class that is "Different."
Every Saturday Evening, from
Seven to Eight O'clock.
"Discussion" Section meets Sun-
day Morning at 9:30.
RBainninz TURSDAY EVENTNG.

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERN
CHiURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Mission Sunday, October 18
9:30 A. M.-German Service,
. .. . A. II. . . - . o

11

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