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September 22, 1931 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN. DA I"Y

Official Bulletin

a in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
iversity. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to
Lent until 3:30, excepting Sundays, 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1931

NO. 1

Attention of all faculty advisors, counsellors, and student assistants
lied regarding the noon luncheon being held today at 12:10 at the
igan Union. They are invited and expected to attend.
Western Union and Postal Telegraph are maintaining branch offices
ag Orientation period in the main lobby of University Hall.
Automobile Regulation: The attention of all students is called to
general interpretation of the Automobile Regulation which is given
is issue of the Daily.
W. B. Rea, Assistant to the Dean
Notice with Respect to "Acceptances" for the Information of all
fbers of the University Staff: The issuing of so-called "acceptances"
tnounts of salary not yet payable, has rcached a point where it has
ed unfortunate in a number of individual cases and has in general
carried far beyond the purp '.-e for which it was designed, namely,
eet an occasional serious emieR'gcncy. As a result the Deans, in con-
ice, have deemed it best to advise the following changes in adminis-
on:
. To meet shortages of funds which are most likely to occur at the
ming of the academic year, after the long vacation, acceptances for
'y dueOctober 31 will be issued on or after October 10, on application
fe Business Office.
2.. After the month of October, in any academic year, acceptances
be issued by the Business Office only on written recommendation of
Dean of the School or College in which the staff member's work
or on written recommendation of the Head of the University division
'oup when this work lies 'outside a School or College.
:t is hoped that emergencies may be met thus without hardship to
ne, and that the habitual use of the acceptance-which is expensive
in general disadvantageous-will disappear.
['he above changes in regulations will be effective with respect to all
ersity payrolls on and after October 1, 1929.
Shirley W. Smith, Secretary and Business Manager

FIFTT-THIRD EA
O WILL BEGIN OCT. 211
John McCormack Will Present
Recital; Rosa Ponselle
to Appear.
ORCHESTRAS TO PLAY.
Thomas, Menuhin, Grainger,
Gabrilowitsch, Russian Chorus
Are Also Listed.
The fifty-third .annual series of
the Choral Union concerts, will
open Oct. 21, when John McCor-
mack, renowned Irish singer, will
present a concert in Hill auditori-
um, Charles A. Sink, president of
the University Musical society,
which maintains the concerts, an-
nounced yesterday.
The series, which brings to Ann
Arbor the outstanding artists of
the musical world every year, this
year will include (besides McCor-
mack): Ossip Gabrilowitsch, distin-
guished pianist and conductor of
the' Detroit. Symphony orchestra,
John Charles Thomas,internation-
ally known baritone, Yehudi Menu-
hin, sgnsational boy violinist who
last year made a successful tour of
America, and Rosa Ponselle, leading
soprano of the Metropolitan Opera
company.[
The Don Cossacks Russian chorus,
which proveda success in Ann Ar-
bor last year, will again appear
January 13, as will Percy Grainger,
Australian-American pianist. The
Boston symphony with Serge Kous-
sevitsky conducting will also ap-
pear on the series. The Detroit sym-
phony, in keeping with a well-
established custom, will again ap-
pear in two concerts, one of which
will be with Dr. Rudolph Siegel as
guest conductor.
The concerts will occur at inter-
vals throughout the year until
March. In May, the annual May
Festival which brings even more
stars and the Chicago symphony, is
given.
Season tickets for the series are:
now on sale in the School of Music
building. Mail orders for season
tickets may be sent to Charles ,A
Sink at that address.

Cheering Section Plan
Is Same as Last.Year
Cheering sections for this year's
football games will be organized on
the same plan as last season, ac-
cording to Harry A. Tillotson, busi-
ness manager of the Athletic asso-
ciation. By this arrangement up-
perclassmen ordering single tickets
will be placed in the preferred sec-
tions between the 30-yard lines.
Colored cards will be placed on the
seats, and will be used to form.
letters and figures under the direc-
tion of cheerleaders.
Ticket sales up to the present
time indicate that the Wolverine
gridiron encounters will be well at-
tended, with sell-outs anticipated
for the most important games.
SCHOOL1 WILL OPE1N
WITH NEWLIBRARHY
More Than 350 Students Begin{
Term at University
High School.
More than 350 students have en-
rolled in the University high school
for the fall term, which opens on
Monday, Sept. 28, with 175 students
registered in the junior and 181 in
the senior high schools.
nExtensive library alterations, fi-
nanced by the University general
maintenance fund, are now being
made in the school.
The cost of alterations, it was
said, will amount to about $2,000.
New offices and conference rooms
are being provided for, and stacks
are being planned as a later de-
velopment.
New science books will be prov~d-
ed for by a donation of $100 from
the American. Association for the
Advancement, of Science, as part
of a prize awarded to Katherine
Marie Hall for having won eighth
place in an essay contest sponsored
by that society. Miss Hall also will
receive a book autographed by a
number of America's leading scien-
tists.
City Council Overrides
Newkirk's First Veto
Mayor H. Wirt Newkirk's first
veto was overridden by the Com-
mon council last night. His honor
objected to awarding a contract for
public business advertising to the
Ann Arbor News on the grounds
that its bid was substantially high-
er than that of the Ann Arbor
Tribune. .

DEA9TH ROBS YPSI
OF FOOTBALL MAN:
Wayne Merrifield, Ann Arbor,
Dies From Injuries Received
in Gridiron Practice.
Because of the death of Wayne"
A. Merrifield, 21, of Ann Arbor,
Michigan State Normal college's
football team has not shown the f
usual drive in-the pre-season prac-.
tices.
Merrifield was a "very promising"
player according to Coach Elton
Rynearson who explained that the
death resulted from internal in-?
juries. Merrifield was going down'
the field with a punt when he suf-,
fered a fractured knee. Later. de-;
velopments caused death.
Ypsi Normal's team is expected to
overcome the blow of the season's}
first death by Oct. 3, when they
open the schedule against the Wol-
verines in Ferry Field.
Ypsilanti has another strong'
team in the making with several of:
last year's stars returning Coach.
Rynearson is putting a great dealt
of time on candidates for the center
and guard positions. Ypsi's tean
sprung a surprise last year when
it held the Michigan Varsity to ai
7 to 0 score in the first game of
the season.
Freshman Glee Club
Tryouts Meet Monday
Tryouts for the Freshman Men's:
Glee club will be held at 5 o'clock,~
next Monday afternoon, in the Var-
sity Glee club's rooms' on the third
floor of the Union.,Prof. David E.
Mattern, director of the organiza-
tion, announced yesterday. All first-
year men are required to serve a
year in this organizatiorr before
they are eligible to take part in the.
Varsity Glee club.'

DEBATE TEAl

HEATED INTERCOLLEGIATE SEA.
With many members of both the 4200 A.H. early this seme.
men's and women's debating teams 'order to gain introduction
back this year, the prospects for literary and debating clubs
another successful season of inter- ry g
collegiate debating are promising, nent on the campus.
according to J. H. McBurney and Among the experienced -dE
Floyd K. Riley, members of the who have returned to the U
Speech department and coaches of sity are: Nathan Levy, '31, ]
the men's and women's debating Simon, '32L, Lawerence H
teams. '31, Dorothy Daniels, '32,
This year, the Varsity debaters Haapamak, '32, Jeanne Ha
for the men will meet teams from '33, Eleanor Gilmore, '33, and
Purdue,',Minnesota, Iowa, and Illi- thy Davis, '33.
nois. The women's team will debate
with those of Northwestern and
Indiana. Definite time schedules "Boys will want two t
are to be announced later.
Last year, the debating teams de- feathers this Fall."
feated Northwestern, Wisconsin,
and Ohio State, but were beaten by 0. B. FISH
both the men's and women's teams Representative desired.
from Indiana. The average of de-
bates won was high enough to give 29-B. 10th St., New York
Michigan the championship of the
Western Conference D e b a t i n g
League. The management of the
debating league goes this year to M
Michigan, and schools are now sub-
mitting - subjects from which a
choice will be made shortly.
Although there are no Varsity . smoke
debating opportunities open to
freshmen, interested first-year men U
are urged to associate themselves
with the debating coaches in room man s

r

Dr. Gilmore Reports
ArikaraIndian Finds
Dr. Melvin R. Gilmore, curator of
ethnology, University Museum of
Anthropology, has returned from a
summer spent at the Fort Berthole
reservation in North Dakota where
he studied the work, activities, and
material culture of the Ankara
tribe of Indians.
Gilmore made motion pictures of
the activities of this tribe and in-
vestigated the "dog travois," a sort
of harness which the Indians used
on dogs to cart their burdens.

0

PIPEFUL of goc
tinctly a mar
women (long may t

I

of

erni
lpha
Zho,
3eta
pa I
; 8.
a P
., 78
Epsi

1017, a
. Phi Si
da Phi
; 21. S
Ita Phi
6.9; 24.
i Psi, 7
i Sigm
76.4; 29
?hi Eps
Phi, 75
acia, 75
35. S
Kappa
.3; 38.1
ma Al
heta Pi
74.3; 42
i Delta,
, 73.9;
46. Psi
)elta, 73
49. Del
phi, 73.
. Theta
Sigma,'
72.0; 55
kappa

iness Staff Tryouts: Report at the business office at
are still positions open to any scholastically eligible
,re interested in this work.
Harcourt Patterson, Bus. Mgr.
Summary of Standings
ties: 1. Triangle, Alpha Phi Alpha, 70.2; 58. Alphi
- Kappa, 80.8; 3. Chi Rho, 68.3; 59. Phi Kappa, 67.7;
79.8; 4. Zeta Beta 60. Phi Delta Theta, 66.6. .
Sigma Psi, 79.3; General Sororities: 1. Pi Beta Phi,
Lambda, 78.9; 7. 82.7; 2. Sigma Kappa, 80.4; 3. Delta
Phi Beta Delta, Delta Delta, 80.3; 4. Kappa Delta,
hi, 78.7; 10. Tau 80.3; 5. Alpha Gamma Delta, 79.9;
.7; 11. Sigma Nu, 6. Phi Sigma Sigma, 79.9; 7. Alpha
lon Pi, 78.6; 13. Xi Delta, 79.3; 8. Alpha Epsilon Phi,
14. Phi Gamma 79.0; 9. Collegiate Sorosis, 78.9; 10.
ta Alpha Epsilon, Chi Omega, 78.8; 11. Kappa Kappa
7.7; 17. Pi Kappa Gamma, 78.8; 12. Alpha Chi Omega,
igma Kappa, 77.6; 78.8; 13. Gamma Phi Beta, 78.5; 14.
, 77.5; 20. Phi Mu Alpha Phi, 78.5; 15. Delta Gamma,
igma Zeta, 77.3; 78.5; 16. Kappa Alpha Theta, 77.3;
, 77.0; 23. Alpha 17.. Delta Zeta, 77.2; 18. Theta Phi
Tau Epsilon Phi, Alpha, 76.3; 19. Alpha Omicron Pi,
76.7; 26, Zeta Psi, 76.1; 20. Zeta Tau Alpha, 75.9; 21.
a Delta, 76.5; 28. Alpha Delta Pi, 73.9.
9. Sigma Pi, 76.2; Professional sororities: Alpha Ep-
lon, 76.2; 31. Al- silon Iota, 78.5.
.8; 32. Hermitage, Women's Dormitories and League
.6; 34. Alpha Phi Houses: 1. Stone, 89.1; 2. Martha
igma Alpha Nu, Cook, 83.0; 3. Carney, 82.8; 4. Helen
Alpha, 75.3; 37. Newberry, 81.5; 5. Betsy Barbour,
Delta Sigma Phi, 80.7; 6. Asman, 79.9; 7. Wilson, 79.9;
pha Epsilon, 74.5; 8. Wood, 79.8; 9. Alumnae 79.5; 10.
, 74.4; 41. Theta Andrus, 79.2; 11. Adelia Cheever,
Theta Chi, 74.3; 78.8; 12. Zoller, 78.6; 13. Reeves, 78.4;
74.0; 44. Alpha 14. Felker, 78.2; 15. Stapleton, 77.9;
45. Phi Kappa 16. Mosher-Jord'an, 77.3; 17. Lash,
Upsilon, 73.8; 47. 76.9; 18. Vogt, 76.7; 19. Gorman,
.7; 48. Phi Kappa 76.2; 20. Holcomb, 75.8; 21. Jen-
ta Upsilon, 73.4; nings, 74.7; 22. Bannasch, 74.6; 23.
3; 51. Phi Kappa Hall, 74.2; 24. Augspurger, 72.7; 25.
a Delta Chi, 72.9; Austin, 72.2; 26. Howser, 72.1; 27.
72.1; 54. Lambda McEachron, 71.4; 28. Shauman, 71.2;
. Delta Chi, 70.8; 29. Rock, 70.1; 30. Mitchell, 69.5; 31.
Epsilon, 70.5; 57. punlap, 69.5; 32. Jeffrey, 68.9.

DRUGS

i

FRESHMEN
WELCOME

I

I~p~says -

We have been serving
.Michigan and her stu-
dents for forty -f iv e

KODAKS

The pipe is not for "a"
pretty girls. the
smokers. And most colli
that the pipe offers the ra
a man could ask of his
When you smoke a
you choose the tobacco
you the greatest
enjoyment. In 42
out of 54 colleges 4
Edgeworth is the
favorite. You can
buy Edgeworth
wherever good
tobacco is sold.
Or for a special Here
sample packet,
write to Larus & Bro. C
St., Richmond, Va. Sa
EDGEWC
SMOKING TO
Edgeworth is a blend of fi
with its natural savor enha
worth's distinctive
and exclusive elev-
enth process. Buy
Edgeworth any-
where in two forms j
-EdgeworthReady- vI
Rubbed and Edge- 1IGI
worth Plug Slice.
All sizes, 15 0pocket
package to $Z.5o
pound humidor tin.

To the Freshmen, "you are always welcome to
come to our studio and see the latest photographs
no obligations. We are glad to have you come
and bring your friends whenever you desire."

years.

Phone
4434

ti h
s
hiM
.' ; r

C ALK N Sai -FETCH ER
Three Dependable Stores

STUDIO
619
E. LIBERTY

324 South State
1101 South University

818 South State

P Photographs

CANDY

SODAS

Lt

r

.

...._:-

ti. . .

_i

Alex
says
the

i

I

Best Tip

Discover.

that many M i c hi g a n
Freshmen will

in their first few days ini
Ann Arbor will be the
paths that

1

Lead

University

0
R

i

t.a

to the R& S
It is here that

LUNCH.

Enjoyed

students
years

.1 )(. >
AC~C

have for many

such
Alex

fine food values.
suggests that you

Stop
in at
R. & S. LUNCH
605 Church St.
for your next meat.

1 .

Alex'll
be with
you every
Sunday.
Watch for
him and
his campus
talk.

#,.

PRE-SEASON DANCE
SATURDAY NIGHT
DON LOOMIS and his Famous Orchestra

LIBRARY SODA BAR
BARBER SHOP BILLIARD ROOM
MAIN DINING ROOM
NOW OPEN

; III - ,. . ,. .

MICrHIG AN

LINI0l

7 III

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