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January 31, 1931 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-31

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rAGJ~ SIX

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SA TURAY. JANUARY 31, 103

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al /Iarquette

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W V0E1 iNES T AK E
SECOND HARD ILTI
Hilltoppers Stand Little Chance
Against Fast Attack of
Maize and Blue.
By Sheldon C. Fullerton
All claims that Marquette's puck
team may have had to the mythi-I
cal Midwest Collegiate H o c k e y
championship were dispelled last
night when Michigan's sextet out-
skated, out-smarted, and out-scored
the Hilltoppers, 4-0, to take its sec-
ond straight triumph in as many
games. Last night's contest was
played at the Coliseum before the
largest hockey crowd that has turn-
ed out this year.
Following Thursday night's 4-1
win over Coach John Hancock's
team, the Wolverine triumph last
night definitely proved that Michi-
gan had by far the superior outfit,
and further increased the belief
that the Marquette win earlier in
the season at Milwaukee was due
more to the poor condition of the
ice than to a better showing by the
Hilltopper team.
Courtis Through.
Although Michigan fans were
content as to the outcome of the
game, each and every one of the
followers of the Maize and Blue
sextet views with regret the pass-
ing of Tommy Courtis as a Varsity
puckman. The aggressive right
wing, a capable running mate for
Crossman and Reid on the offense,
and a tower of strength on the de-
fense, is due to graduate at the
close of the present semester, and
his departure will leave a big gap
to fill W.1 the ranks of the Wolver-
ine team. The game he played last
night was typical of the kind he
has exhibited all through his ca-
reer on the team, his vicious back-
checking and agressiveness taking
the puck away from Marquette
players time and again.
Reid, Crossman Score.
Again t was Reid and Crossman
who led the way to the Michigan
triumph. Emmy Reid, left winger,
(Continued on Page 7)
SUMMARY
Michigan Pos. Marquette
Reid ...........1w....... McCann
'.2urtis.......rw..... Nicholson
Crossman ...... . c ..... Wettlaufer
Williams .......ld. .... McFayden
Prouse .........rd....... Peterson
Tompkins ........g........ Schultz
Spares: Michigan-Schlanderer,
S i n d 1e s. Marquette-McDonald,
Elnes, Finkbeiner, Furlong.
Scoring.
1st Period-Reid (Crossman),
19:23. Penalties-Williams, Mc-
Fayden.
2nd Period-N o n e. Penalties-
Peterson, McCann, Reid.
3rd Period-Reid unassisted, 7:04;
Crossman unassisted, 10:37; Reid
unassisted, 13:16. Penalties-Cross--
man, Peterson, Sindlos, Williams,
Courtis.
Stops-- Tompkins- 21 Schultz-

VARSITY CAGERS
WILL MEET YPSI
Wolverines Play Normal Quintet
in Practice for Hoosiers.
The V3rsity "B" baketball team
defeated Flint Gneral Mtrs Tech
on the upstate floor last night 36-
21.
After a two week period of in-
activity interspersed with occasion-
I al drills, the Wolverine Varsity
quintet will meet the Michigan
State Normal five here in a practice
game the first night after the sec-
ond semester opens, in a practice
game. Thursday night the Teach-
ers came from behind in the last
five minutes of the game to take a
22-19 decision from the Michigan
"B" team, and it is expected that
they will offer little resistance to a
drubbing at the hands of the Vars-
ity.
Michigan's in and out first string-
ers that have figured in several up-
sets thus far this season will take
a workout on the Ypsilanti five
previous to encountering the strong
Hoosier quintet here the following
Saturday. The court battle with the
Indiana quintet will be the first
Conference game for the Varsity
since they so decisively romped over
the Buckeyes to the tune of 40-22
last Monday.
Wolves Show Strength.
The Wolverines stand in fifth posi-
tion in the Big Ten championship
scramble and have looked strong
enough in the past two encounters
to go through the remainder of the
season with flying colors in spite of
three defeats already chalked up,
in the loss column against four
victories.
The lineup for the Wolves to
start against Ypsilanti will be in
doubt for some time as a result of
two weeks of comparative inactiv-
ity. It is highly probable that Coach1
Veenker will use a long list of sub-
stitutes during the course of the
battle with the Hurons in case the
first stringers succeed in pulling out
in front with a safe margin of
points.
The Ypsilanti five will in all prob-
ability be composed of Gabel and,
Kozlusky at forwards, Middlestat at
center, and Leach and Ostlund at
guards. Kozlusky and Leach are the
outstanding point getters for the
team, accounting for 18 of their
team's 22 markers against the Jun-
ior Varsity.
National Swim Meet
Slated for Chicago
(Sp 'c( d !o IIt710 iv)
EVANSTON, Jan. 30.-The Lake
Shore Athletic Club in Chicago has
been selected as the site for the
National Collegiate Swimming meet
to be held March 27 and 28 under
the auspices of Northwestern Uni-
versity. The meet was originally
scheduled to be heldat Patten
Gymnasium, but the short length
of the pool and limited seating

One
on

of the New Men
Purdue Cage Team

ihows B 11r ant Form Ur
OO STT e Varsity Win Game ?
TEA1 WI1_NS IA TCHM K 8 ~ Y ll

irst Gynastic Meet Ever Held
:Cere ResuLs in Victory
for Invaders.

: : : >By John Thomas
Michigan lost the first gymnastics
meet in the history of the Univer-
sity last night in the Intramural
building to Ohio State, . to 874.
Coach West is highly satisfied#
with his green team in holding the
strong Ohio State squad as close as
the final result indicated. T h e
Michigan team stepped out early,
winning in succession the horizon-
tol bar, horse, and rings. Then
Ohio State found itself and won
the parallel pars, tumbling, and In-
{ dian clubs by enough margin to win
the total score.
Fred Schiller leaa ne Michigan
scoring with 147 points, taking two
firsts. H a r r y Steinburg followed
closely with a second and a first
totaling 135 1-2 points. The Al-
fred Decker made 91 1-2 points by
taking a third and a second.
Michigan starteo out well by'
placing a first and a third in the
horizontal bar event when Schiller
made 762 points, Coons of Ohio
IStt",, 6912 and Jsck Goldsmith
followed with 53%. The team total
was Michigan 177 1 2, Ohio 169%.1
AssociatedPressPhoto In the horse event Adrian of Ohio
Rad Edd won with 74 , Harry Steinburg
Wasn fteyoun r placed second, 66%, and his broth-
Wheirneoteyoungsters A teon Ialoo Mcign
Purdue's basketball team and seems r, A. Steburg, also of Michigan,
to promise big things on the courts was third scoring 60 points. The
this year. He is one of the additions totals were 172 1/2 to 166 1/2 in
made since the Western Conference te Maize and Blue's favor.y
mamesnceathehWdstrnoferendeth Schiller and Coons tied for firstI
champs have ad to rebuild the place in the rings event each scor-f
whole combination. Iir n 1A1 A I fnA 1^1-

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Woverines Tae Saber Event to DeStefano lost the first sabre
Accont fo Winning Point event to D'Amore in a close result
in Cof 5-4. Then Cordon, lashing in
his choice event-tsabre, defeated
Straits and D'Amore by scores of
.5-2 aind5-3, St fano won the re-
Af t r hL iw Gh. *Saleto a rraining. mtch5-'3 from Straits.
SCOI of foilThisrs, M - Thai bro ht the Michigan total to
igan's1)n l won the 7 and 6 for Ohio.
Ten sched- Michig:n needed only a tie in the
e bye b ents 3-1 rests h epee bouts and Powers
detep wonth fi]r(3;fro Jones 2-1. Winig,
mat ches 2--, 1nga fnal out- following his teammates lead, dis-
e ohenramal pensed with Sandfort clinching the
building meet by a score of 2-0. P. Jones and
CaPtain Gord o led his eam to Sandfort of Ohio won the remain-
victory by taoking iwo s:ibre natches ing matches from Winig and Pow-
and tvo foil events after losing the ers bringing the final team score to
openingni a ch of the evening. 9-8 in Michigan's favor.
Fricd an, in the estimation of the I Mr. A. E. Sauer, American 3 wea-
judges, gave the brs exhibition of, pon champion in 1909, 1913, and
his career last night. He was the 1916 was the chief official of the
best fencer on the floor particularly meet. Ielping him was Major Ed-
in the parrying and the repost. wards, Prof. G. L. Jensen, Mr. Smel-
Mihian presented the better lie, and Lient. Coursey. Coach John-
o'i;hed a, wel drilled in the st one announced that this group
iii:po o fecing. Ohio State, of officials was composed of men
on the other Lad used a rushing, ,who knew the lfinest points of
agresive ty which was mor" fencing.
popular with the crowd but les-

Bill Williams,
Star Michigan di/nse man who
played a brilliant game last night
against Marquette. Williams proved
to be a stone wall to the attempts
of the invading forwards when they
approached the Wolverine goal.
Splashers Will Not
Drill During Exams
Matt Mann's natators will have
no practice of any kind during the
examination period, but will be re-
called to action immediately after
the beginning of the second semes-
ter, as a meet with Michigan State
College is scheduled for February
18th.

skil d. Mr. Smellie, captin of the
Navy team in 1920, said that the
crash banging Ohio fencing mad
it possible to win or lose quickly.
In the first event of the evening,
Captain Gordon lost to Fillman oz
Ohio State 5-3 in the foils. Fried-
man, star of Michigan's team, lost
another hard bout to Fuchs, 5-3.
Then Michigan broke into the win-
ning column when Lovell defeated
Jones, 5-3. Michigan dropped the
next two meets before Gordon shut-
out Jones, 5-0. This started a two
match winning streak as Lovell and
Gordon defeated their opponents.
With the foils event 4-4, the
last dueling saw Ohio State come
through making the total 5-4 in
their favor.

HLLER '
State Street jewelers

I

Pare Turns Pro, to
Join Tilden's Tour'
Emmett Pare of Chicago, 15th
ranking ulayer in the United States,
announced today that he has turn-
ed professional and will join forcest
witn William Tilden's exhibitiont
troup which will tour the country.
Pare will probably make his prot
debut at Chicago Stadium, Feb. 25.

mng 7u ' points. Aifred Decker
placed third with 66. Michigan
again out-scored their opponents in
team totals, 201 1 2 to 195 1/2.
Parallel bars saw Harry Stein-
burg in first place with 69, followed
by two Ohio men, Heppberger 61,
and Green 58. A mishap cost Mich-
igan more than 25 points in their
team totals, going behind by 173/2
to 147 1/2.
Ohio placed first and second in
the tumbling division when Hoover
(Continued on Page 7)

seals in the elicious natural flavors of foods

{lI

Ili

F5 - - -2
Friday, 4:15, Jan. 30-Mendelssohn Theatre

11

. , RECITAL

i I{

Frances eck, Pianist
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Monday, 8:15, Feb. 2-Hill Auditorium
Negro Baritone
In C $oral Union Series
Tickets:W $1.00, $1..50, $2.00, $2.50

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16. capacity caused the change.
LANE H ALL TAVENRN
The Chocest of Wholes oe Foods
SUNDAY DINNER, 12-2:30.. ...... 75c
SPECIAL RABBIT DINNER
EVERY MONDAY EVENING, 5-7.. .. c
= -=
IER T
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Wedrosd"y, 4: Feb. 4--Hill Auditorium
P h1i) JIaowc, Org at
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
nd y, 4:1 F,[eb. 8--Mendelssohn Theatre
Pinscnted by HANNS PICK
11ssisled by

i
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'ii
a
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Vioi.in-_

Joseph Brinkman
Piano

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NO ADMISSION CHARGE

ALSO MANY FURNISHING
MAY BE HAD
Come downtown to

Tuesday, 8:15, Feb. 10-Hill Auditorium
" :EdRC E :; A Cfr HMANTNOFF
:Russian Pianist
In Choral Union Series
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
Sunday, 4:15, Mar. 1-Mendelssohn Theatre
aUuLTY OeNCER T SPEinESi
Maud Okkelberg, Pianist

SPECIALS

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