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January 28, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, JANUAR~Y 28, 1931Tl IHGN-AL

THE MIC-HICAN

.D T L -Y

PAGE THREJ

BUSINESS S( VEY
SHO W'S MICHIGAN'S

COLORADO PRESIDENT RECEIV ES
ENTHUSIASTIC WELCOME ON RETURN

[[[g| ( I ( 0 PDNUNIVERSITY PHYSICISTS CONDUCT
COLLE P N SOUND ATESTS U0SDERNEAT HUGROSUND tIL
Prof. F. . Firestone Directs fan is a microphone which whirls
TRI li B[Y 10 Work in Sound Room Below through the room, picking up the ULtI LI I LlU

CTIES

IMP RD VINC

IPIiyics Bud.*d;ing,.

Western Open
to be Fought

Champion Title
for in Chicago

on February 20 and 21.

Radio microphones and an echo-
ing room give more accurate re-
suits in testing the loudness of
sounds than does a room heavily

Magazine Report Reveals Note
of Optimism in Predicting
General Improvement.
INDUSTRIES SHOW GAIN
Many Ann Arbor Manufacturers
Report Increased Orders;
Some Operate Overtime.
(13v Associated I'ress)
DETROIT, Jan,. v.Survcy oi
Michbigan cities based on busines
conditions during 1930 and state-
ments of executives as to pressru.
prospects indicates, says the Mich-
igan Manufacturer and Financial
Record in its current issue, that a
gradual improvement is generally
expected for 1931.
Includes City Reports.
The survey report included the
following reports from various cit-
ies:
Muskegon - Manufacturers gen-
erally are optimistic. Muskegon
Piston Ring Co. reports unfilled or-
ders 20 per cent ahead of 1930.
Shaw Crane works expects s lo w
start and gradual improvement.
Fair to good prospects seen by oth-
er manufacturers.
Flint-Conditions have been help-
ed by rehiring of workers in plants
of Buick, Chevrolet, A. C. Spark
Plug and Fisher Body companies.
E. T. Strong, Buick president, sees
"more than a little evidence which
indicates a promising outlook."
Pontiac-Steaay return of busi-
ness activity predicted for year by
executives of Pontiac's leading fac-
tories. Motor firms see in new
models and more efficient sales or-
ganizations prospects for steadier
production schedules and more sta-
ble payrolls than in 1930 when the
average employment in the eight
principal plants was 13,263.
Local Survey Good.
Ann Arbor-Increased orders were
reported by most Ann Arbor firms,
and the American Broach & Ma-
chine Co. already is operating over-
time. Executives believe the year
will see a steady improvement in
conditions.
Port Huron-The past year was
one of expansion for Port Huron,
with three companies purchasing
f a c t o r y sites, paper production
above the 1929 figure and an in-
creased payroll by Detroit Edison
Co. Firms generally expect im-
provements during the next few
months.

A
1
;I

(S i it T / -padded in an attempt to smother
CHICAGO, Jan. 27.--College men all but the original source of sound,
throughout the Middle West will University physicists working under
an opportunity of proving the direction of Prof. F. A. Fire-
have:stone have proved.
their sui;eriority at ping-pong when r s
IThe University sound room is
they gather in the ballroom of the located three stories underground
LaSalle hotel in Chicago to fight beneath the East Physics building.
for the title of western open cham- Standing on its own foundation,
,ion on Feb. 20 and 21. and with an air space at the sides
The biggest ping-pong tourna- and top, the room is in fact an in-
ment ever held outside New York dependent mall building buried
within a larger one and unaffted

sound at different points and con-
veying it outside to a series of am-
plifying tubes, meters and a de-
vice for tuning in whatever pitches
of the total sound are desired.
This method of sound testing al-
lows accurate determination of the
whole amount of sound and is su-
perior for purposes of sound inten-
sity measurement to methods car-
ried out in a padded room, since the
walls of the latter at best never ab-
sorb even half the sounds to inter-
fere with the direction from the
source.
In this echoing room however,
though a word can be heard for
fifteen seconds, and is reflected
back and forth for three miles.
RADIO TODAY
Prof. David E. Mattern, of the
School of Music, will speak at 2
o'clock this afternoon from the
University studio, broadcasting
over WJR. His subject will be
"The Dawn of the Civic Orches-
tra."
Sidney Straight, tenor, will be
vocalist on t o d a y's program,
which is one of the regular Uni-
versity of the Air presentations
broadcast four times a week at
this time.

Clements Libratian Gives Plans
for Washington Celebration
in Radio Address.
Speaking; of the Washington Bi-
centennial to be held in 1932 on
the two hundredth anniversary of
the birth of George Washington,
Randolph G.. Ada ms, librarian of
the William Ciements library, in a
radio address yesterday afternoon
from the University studio, stressed
the kind of activity contemplated
for this celebration.
"One example will suffice as to
the kind of activity planned," said
Adams, "and that is hilt thei na-
tional commission - a Washington
has decided that noth~iig could
more adequately mark such an an-
niversary than the publication of a
George Washington."
The project, he continued, is now
under way to print a 30-volume
edition of these letters, each book
of which will be at least 500 pages
in length.
Adams asked anyone who might
have valuable copies of letters writ-
ten by Washington, to send a copy
>f them into either himself or Mr.
John Fitzpatrc at the library of
Congress, who has been intrusted
with the editing of tis work.

-Jis to be played, according to an y
Associated Press Photo announccment yesterday by the vibrations from outside s
Dr. Ceorge Norlin, president of the University of Colorado, Boulder, Inter-fraternity club, of Chicago, Within, the chamber isJ
received an enthusiastic welcome from the students of the University 'its sponsor. It will be held under with hard plaster walls, a
when he returned aft er a prolonged illness. "This Is the best necicinc the auspices of the American Ping- a cube in shape, free from
I've had," he (center) toid Zohner P "ules (left), editor of the student Pang association. Rules of the as- tions, it encourages rat
paper, and Charles Beise, president of the student body. sociation will govern play, which of any sound within it.
' .__- _--_-means that only the "bounce" serv- the apparent confusion
Congress of National Student Federation ice will be permitted. there is suspended from tl
ounlay wasanun a two bladed fan of lar
Deplores Subsid iz~ng _ Firstrounlplay ittasletiunc which i-evolves slowvly, an(
of CoiegeAthleics(d, will begin at 7 o'clock on Friday,
.- .Feb. 20. Entry fees have been set ually breaks up the reve
Opinion Is Result of Conference participation in extra-curricula ac- at $1. The tournament will be lim-sound waves from the w
of Student Delegates tivities ited to the first 250 applicants, and smaller and mixed echos.
Al The congress' last resolution was 15 tables will be used. Attached t-o each blad
the most radical. It proposed "that --- --j-
----the sixth student federation of F - --
Coincident with last week's an- America empower its officers to
nouncement of the Conference de- make a thorough investigation of I

by sound
ources.
furnished
and being
any pro-
Cher than
berations
ro add to
of echos
he ceiling
ge area
A contin-
rberating
malls into
e of this

a ._

f
,!
,
l
r

bate topic for the second semester,
that of commercialism of student
athletics, came the report of the
National Student federation from
Atlanta, Ga., deploring subsidiza-
tion in college athletics. The opin-
ion was the result of a three-day
discussion and parliamentary fights
between student delegates from.
more than 175 college campuses in,
the United States.
The federation passed three reso-
lutions which summarized the gen-
eral student opinion on the prob-
lem. The first stated their general
belief, that the "sixth annual Con-
gress of the National Student fed-
eration of America deplores the
subsidizing of college athletics."
Their second and third resolu-
tions proposed that not only should
equal recognition be given to schol-
astic achievement as well as phys-
ical prowess, but that they would
sponsor a country-wide movement
to purge American colleges and
universities of commercialism in
athletics. The second resolution as
adopted stated "that the sixth
student federation go on record as
favoring the award of scholarships
on the same basis, regardless of

the possibility of bringing about a
nation-wide conference of college
presidents, athletic directors and
student leaders on commercialism
and professionalism in college ath-
letics."
What's Going On
THEATRES
Majestic-"Dixiana" with Bebe
Daniels, Bert Wheeler, Robert Wool-
sey, Robert Marshall.
Michigan - Joan Crawford in
"Paid."
Wuerth -- "Billy the Kid" with
Wallace Beery and John Mack
Brown.
GENERAL
Recital-Poems from Tennyson
and Browning, at open meeting of
the Michigan Interpretive Arts as-
sociation; 7:30 o'clock, room 302,
Mason hall.
Concert-Palmer Christian, Uni-
versity organist, 4:15 o'clock, Hill
auditorium.
Exhibit-Water colors and pencil
drawings by Mrs. James C. Stanley;
opens today, west gallery, Alumni
Memorial hall.

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Features of the evening, fashion notes, re-

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of the names of lady guests, all contribute to make this
a worth-while feature.
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