100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MI I=-II AID RAIL i

SA'T'URDAY. JANUARY 24. 1931

T HIGN A L -TI ~ A A T T R 4 i a

3i$ V61i1 iti-Ad:4 A. 4"x, A~OA

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
MeImber of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 2124.
EDITORIAL STAFFr
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRANK E. COOPER, City Editor
News Editor ..............Gre Williams
Editorial Director.........Walter . Wilds
Sports Editor............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor..........Mary L. Behymer
Music,nDrama, Books.... .Wn. 3. Gorman
Assistant City Editor .harold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor...........George A. Stautei
Copy Editor..................Wi. F. Pypet
NIGHT EDITORS

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

John D. Reindel
Richard L. Tobin
Harold O. Warren

natural right of ways, are originally
monopolistic and must be provided
competition. The viewpoint must
be one of public service; thus, legis-
lation upon motor-bus monopoly is
of doubtful importance so long as
the gasoline carrier serves the pub-
lic more chiefly and expediently
than the railroad. The evil does
not lie in lack of bus regulation,
but rather in "overregulation" of
railroads.
TO THE EDITOR.
January 21, 1931
Dear Sir:
I am assuming that you desire
correct information when writing
editorials or publishing the actions
of Congress, so I am addressing
you concerning an editorial that
appeared in your issue of January
13, 1931, entitled "Airing the Sen-
ate's Dirty Linen."
You said toward the end of the
editorial: "We note with pleasure,
much as one would rejoice on find-
ing an oasis in a desert, that one
of Michigan's Senators, Arthur
Vandenberg, voted against the mo-
tion to send the request to the
President, and against putting the
names back on the Senate calendar.
Michigan's multi-millionaire anti-
capitalist Couzens' name failed to
appear on the roll call."
The facts are that I lead the fight
against the motion to send the re-
quest to the President, and sup-
ported the President's viewpoint.
The roll call so shows, as well as
my speech in the Senate. It is true
that I was not in the Senate when
the names were placed back on the
calendar, but that was a wholly
unimportant move, because they
are still on the calendar and it
means nothing either to the con-
tinuance of the Commission or to
the President.
Very truly yours,
James Couzens.
Campus Opinion
Contributors ae asked to be brief,
confining themse es to less that. oo
words if possible. Anonymnous corn-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon 4e-
quest. Letters publishied should not be
construedeas expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

i

4

,I
JANUARY 24

SPORTS ASSISTANTS
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert Townsend
REPORTERS

J E. Bush
Thomas M. Cooley
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbreth
ack Goldsmith
oland Goodman
Morton Helper
Jdgar Hornik
James Johnson
.Bryan Jones
Dentoi C. Kunze
Powers Moulton,
Eileen Blunt
Elsie Feldman
Ruth Gallmeycr
T mily G. Grimes
Jean levy
Dorothy Magee

EDfOL UsiC AND DRA
THIS IS -------.
SATURDAY.

TYPEWRITING
and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A speciality for twenty1
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced{
ators . . . Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone

Wilbur J. Meyers
Brainard WV. Nies
Robert L. Pierce
Richard Racine
Theodore T. Rose
berry E Rosenthal
C'harles A. Sanford
Karl Sciffert
Robert F. Shaw
Edwin M. Smith
George A. Stauter
johni . Thomas
john S. Townsend.
Mary McCall
Margaret 0, Brien
Eleanor Rairdoni
Antic Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Ciaire Trussell

By Dan Baxter.
Baxter
i t seems that there is a lot of
illness among our faculty members
these days, and speculation is rife
as to whether they are ill from the
effects of their consciences after
that last exam, or whether there
has been an influx of beautiful
nurses to the city, bringing up the
old question Quis Custodiet ipsos,
custodes which, literally translated
means-"I wonder what Prof. -'s
nurse looks like?"
** *r
IT MUST BE THE WEATHER Dept.
Note: This department is for the
benefit of Daily readers who are
puzzled by any of the problems that
arise about the campus. If you have
anything troubling you like sudden
pains in the back, spots before the
eyes, exams coming on the last day
of exam week, or worry over why
the instructor in your 8 o'clock in-
sists on wearing a purple tie at that
ungodly hour of the morning, write
to the Daily, care of the It Must Be
The Weather Dept. and get the
benefit of the advice and erudition
of the entire Rolls staff. Manu-
scripts will positively not be re-
turned unless self-addressed en-
velope containing ten-dollar bill is
enclosed.
Out of today's mail we have
selected the following letter to be
the first one answered by our new
department.
Dear It Must Be The Weather:
Zimbalist our cat has what I
am sure would be the measles
if she didn't have so much hair
that her skin is all covered up
so you can't tell. She also has
three month-old kittens and a
habit of upsetting the garbage
pail. What would you suggest?
Worried Silly.
Dear Silly:
It must be the weather.
DAN BAXTER.
Another reader-pardon me, a
reader-send in to claim the sleep-
ing-in-Angell-Hall prize because,
according to his statement, he has
never been asleep there at all. Until
substantiation of his claims is
forthcoming, we are shelving this
application on the grounds that he
probably never attended a class in
the Building in question.
* * *

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Bsiness Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON, Assistant Manager
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising.................Charles T. Kline
Advertising...............liomas M. Davis
Advertising........... William X. Warboys
Service..........Norris J. Johnson
Publication...........Roiert W. Williamson
Circulation...............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts.................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary..........Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

TONIGHT: In the Lydia Men-
delssohn theatre, the last perform-
ance of REBOUND.
BORIS GOUDONOFF
A feature of the May festival this
year will be the concert presenta-
tion in the original of Mousorgsky's
opera "Boris Goudonoff." This will
be played by the Chicago symphony
orchestra with soloists and chorus.
"Boris Goudonoff" was written by
Mousorgsky in 1868. It was first
published in 1928 by the Music sec-
tion of the Russian state publishing
department from original auto-
graphed hanuscripts. Simultan-
eously it appeared in German,
French and English translations.
Because of the composers lack of
knowledge of orchestration and the
skeleton harmonies of the work, it
was never presented in the original
until Leopold Stokowski rendered it
in Philadelphia last April.
It had been the custom up till
recently, as has already been stated,
to use the Rimsky-Korsakoff ver-
sion for all stage performances. The
May festival will mark the second
presentation of the original in this
country. Until the publication of
the original manuscript, it had been
thought that Mousorgsky's writing
was lacking in the fundamentals of
dramatic construction. For operatic
performance it was thought that
the composer had exhibited an
ignorance of the needs of the stage.
The Rimsky version was thought
to be a real and sympathetic one
because of the affinities of the com-
posers, both belonging as they did
to the Russian school opposed to
the Tchaikovsky teutonics.
With the publication of the man-
sucripts and the first rendition,
many of the misapprehensions (as
they now clearly are) were correct-
ed. It was seen that although "Boris
Goudonoff" was really a concert
work rather than an opera in
intrinsic value, it exhibited a direct-
ness of attack anl a splendid viril-
ity and simplicity, which the
Rimsky-Korsakoff version with all
its brilliance and virtuosity, lacked
entirely. Rimsky it was seen, had
for the sake of the stage, filled out
harmonics and changed keys, in so
doing completely negating the real
value of Mousorgsky.
The music as itnow stands, and
as it will be presented in the May
Festival, is a splehdid representa-
tive of that class of artistic endea-
vor which depends entirely on in-
spiration rather than a profound
knowledge of the technical phases
of the metier. It is music devoid
of the web of harmonics and varia-
tions to which one is accustomed.
Partly through the exigencies of
the text, partly because of the limi-
tations of Hill auditorium, it will
be given a conced performance.
S. S. F.
ALBERT SPALDING
Albert Spalding, the distinguished
American violinist, will be heard in
Ann Arbor for the third time Tues-
day evening of next week, in the
eighth program of this season's
series of Choral Union concerts. He
has been heard before both as solo-
ist at the May Festival and in con-
cert. On both occasions he received
a profound ovation, which enthus-
iasm urged the School of Music to
secure his return this year for an
additional recital.
Mr. Spalding will play the fol-
lowing program, assisted at the
piano by Mr. Andre Benoist:

4
I

BROWN-CRESS
& Company, Inc.
IN VESTMENT
S ECU It ITIES
Orders executed on all ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.
Telephone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st FLOOR ;J

For Rent
Apartments
FOREST PLAZA - Ann
A r b o r' s finest residental
apartment. Furnished or
unfurnished. I to five room
arrangements. C o m p 1 e t e
hotel service. Garage in
connection. Eve. 22927.
Also a number of fine fur-
n i s h e d and unfurnished
houses.
Brooks-Newton Inc.
Eve. 22571, 22735, 4495

oper-
6615

CLEAN UP
FOR THE
J-HOP HOUSE
PARTY
We have a complete line
of
PAINT, VARNISH,
WALLPAPER, ETC.
WENZEL'S
207 East Liberty
Phone 6713

i

Special Attention!
Fraternities,
r-
Sororities,
And Others
Beginning Saturday, Jan.
uary 24 and Ending Feb-
ruary 14, 1931.
Extra Special
Discount on

- fl..

III

WANT ADS PAY!,

i

J

III

310 SothSat tre

U'

"i

(

ff ,
'
"
.
b
,[Jl ,. ...
_.. _J.SttLe. n
} tv ,' tj i itl 1 (f t t
'"- tl 'a- 0 ti ---^ -

I

First quality, no seconds, latest
1931 styles, no dropped patterns
or colors, Domestic Rugs and
Carpets for three weeks, to in
troduce to the Ann Arbor people
the fact that Merrick's SELL ALL
THE TIME not only Heirloom
Handmade Chinese Rugs much
lower than rugs of equal quality
and beauty and authentic Chinese
design can be bought elsewhere,
but that you can also buy of
Merrick's anything in Domestic
Carpets or rugs made by any firm
in America.. All latest style and
first quality of its kind. No sec-
onds. No dropped patterns or
colors; from the cheaptest type to
the most costly-but each, ALL
THE TIME at less than you can
by the same thing elsewhere.
Merrick's

n

Harry R. Begley
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davis
Richard H. Hiller
Miles Hoisington

Erle Kightlinger
Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Stratemeier
Keith Tyler
Noel D. Turner
Byron C. Vedder
Sylvia Miller
Helen Olsen
Mildred Postal
Marjorie Rough
Mary E. Watts
Johanna Wiese

Ann W. Verner
Afarian Atran
Helen Bailey
Tusephine Convissert
Maxine Fishgrund
Dorothy LeMire
Dorothy Laylin

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1931
Night Editor-,BEACH CONGER, Jr.
THE HOUSE TURNS SPY
On the heels of the public presen-
tation of the Wickersham report,
the House of Representatives has,
successfully, but unfortunately, re-
sisted all attempts to strike out
from the four department supply
bill, the provisions which make
possible the establishment of gov-
ernment "traps," to snare the un-
wary, the use of government money
for purchasing alcoholic evidence,
and the tapping of private tele-
phone 'lines in the fanatic search
for prohibition violators.
We are inclined to believe with
Representative Beck, of Pennsyl-
vania, that this procedure, particu-
larly the wire-tapping, "violates the
fundamental decencies of human
life." Even the Supreme Court on
a recent case of this nature held
the practice "unethical," but re-
fused to take action because it
could not be construed as "unrea-
sonable search and seizure."
The successful defense of such,
measures can only mean the estab-
lishment of an odious, unethical,
and unprincipled spy system which
comes close to the private life of
every American and it can be only
a question of time until the public
will revolt against such practices.
Moreover, only an abnormal and
unhealthy law must depend for its
enforcement upon measures whicht
are so obviously "unethical" and sot
obviously contrary to any American?
principle of personal liberty or per-1
sonal justice.
BUS REGULATION .
The interstate commerce com-x
mnittee of the Senate has delegatedt
the task of drawing up legislationi
for the regulation of interstate bust
companies to a sub-committee with
the hope that action will be brought1
about during the present session.1
The exact objective of the com-
mission is hardly apparent, 'al-
though there seems to be some in-t
fluence abroad from the railroad'st
view-point.to elimina-,e recent cut-G
throat competition from motorbust
companies.I
It is as if "Congress had legis-t
lated in 1850 to keep windjammers
on the seas in competition withN

ANOTHER MODERNIST REVOLTS
In regards to the review of Rabbi
Bernard Heller's latest essay on
"The Modernists Revolt Against
God" which appeared in the Daily
on Thursday, I might add that I
have read the pamphlet and the
result is that I am pretty much dis-
appointed in the way in which
Heller handles his third part after
such a promising beginning.'
When one starts to read the
book, he immediately is seized with
the idea that perhaps after all here
is going to be a worthwhile offer-
ing to the much-needed opposition
to the GREAT COLLEGIATE GOD
MENCKEN and his silver-tongued
trumpet MERCURY. He analyzes
Mencken's whole attitude in a grat-
ifying and satisfactory method and
his use of footnotes to back up his
statements is particularly helpful.
Mencken in this part is what is
called in the vernacular "taken for
a ride."
In his second part, moreover, he
takes apart the new theory of HU-
MANISM and is singularly success-
ful. His arguments, mostlyproven
by other philosophers, are well
founded and close to the point.
One receives the impression after
completing this section that the
learned rabbi has something here
which perhaps after all will an-
swer some of the arguments which
our either half-baked intelligentsia
or supposedly scientific exponents
of atheism are wont to give to the
rest of us poor mortals who appar-
ently still have enough intelligence
and power of research to still hold
to a BELIEF.
One then reads the third part.
All his hopes for a counteracting
argument to atheism and its ac-
companying satellites are dashed.
Heller here gives his own views on
atheism and his ideas on the reme-
dies for it. One has probably read
them a hundred times before in
perhaps a different guise in simi-
lar essays by other clergymen and
is thoroughly disgusted with them.
How is it possible, one wonders
when reading this section, for an
honest clergyman to say that we
must not teach a belief in God
through deduction but by drilling
into a child from infancy up that
there is a God and that he shows
himself in everything. This is all
poppycock. Ninety per cent of the
people who have turned to atheism
where brought up in religion in
this way and then despite the fact
t h a t this argument confronted
them in every way, they began to
wonder and question and because
their intelligence didn't quite go
far enough they associated with
themselves a disbelief.
We are living in an age of reason.
Wouldn't it be more to the benefit

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"VIRTUE"
Dr. Fisher
7:30 P. M.- Evening Worship.
"MODERN CHINA'S
CHRISTIAN PRESIDENT"
Mrs. Fisher
THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will speak on, "THE
RECOVERY OF PRAYER."
12:00 N.-University Students will
meet at Guild House, opposite the
Church. Mr. Chapman in charge.
5:30 P. M.-Student Social Hour,
and "eats."
6:30 P. M.-Devotional Hour. Miss
Jean Davidson, leader. Topic:
"The Relation of Religion to Life."
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. b-tween Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmalc
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.--Morning Worship.
Sermon: "he Au thority of Jesus."
11:00 A. M.--Service in German.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEVAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 Noon-Regular Sunday School
Classes.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Service.
"Christ Through the Pen of the
Poet" directed by Ralph Johnson.
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Prohibition Or-?"
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet.
ing. Leader: Richard McCreary.
6:30 P. M.-,The Graduate, Profes
sional and Business Young Peo
ple's discussion group will meet
with Dr. M. H. Anderson, 326 S.
Division St.

.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:15 A. M.-Religious Service.
Address by Rabbi Bernard Heller.
Subject: "Have the Jews a Mis-
sion."

, I

I;

1

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister

r

January 25, 1931

BUILDING IN QUESTION
(Courtesy Rolls Art Department),
* * *
. a
We are informed that the Bobb-
sey Twins went to the Play the
other night come next Thursday. As
they emerged from the old Mimes
Chicken Coop, one of them was
heard to remark that he was dis-
appointed to find that "REBOUND"
was not a tragedy about the lib-
rary and its denizens.
It might rain at that.
NEW FEATURE
Henceforth Rolls will publish
once a day a poem by some famous
author all dealing with the philo-
sophy of LIFE and pointing out
some moral or giving a bright
thought to help you through the
day. Not having any famous au-
thors on deck for the first issue,
Rolls will have to do its best with
the local talent. We suggest, how-
ever, that you cut these out each
day as they appear and hang them
on your bedroom wall as a reminder
of Susie, your pet groundhog who
died of a Michaelmas Day in the
Marrrnin' - saints presarve her
sowl !
See the pic-ture of your grand-pa
Ing-ing on the par-lor wall
We don't wear clothes like that
now
It's a fine world after all!
* * *
Say Gents, here's a swell chance
to exercise your metrical propensi-
ties, taking care to pull down the
shades first lest the neighbors think
you are too silly for words. Just sit
down and puzzle this one over for
a moment. I guarantee that, with

l

TH EOSOPHY
The Principles of the Teosophical
Society are:
FIRST-To form a nucleus of the
Universal Brotherhood of Hu-
manity, without distinction of race,
creed, sex, cast or color.
SECOND-To encourage the study
of comparative religion, philosophy
and science.
THIRD-To investigate theunex-
plained laws of nature and the
powers latent in man.
Study It.
The Theosophical Society m e e t s
Wednesday evenings in the Michi-
gan League at 8 o'clock. You arc
welcome.
-4

10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Living with One's
Self."
9:30 A. M.--Church School.
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship so.
cial half hour.
6:00 P. M.-Fellowship supper.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Melvin Gilmore
will speak on "Indians as Human
Beings."
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan 1. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall).
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00~A. M. - Morning Prayer.
Sermon by the Right Reverend
John N. McCormick, D.D.
6:30 P. M.-Student Supper. Speak-
er, Bishop McCormick. '
7:45 P. M.-Evensong and Address
by Mr. Lewis on "Rufus Jones the
Quaker." The student choir will
sing a special Anthem, "Come
Holy Ghost our Souls Inspire" by
Palestina.

7:00 P. M. - Young
League meeting.

People's

La Folia-..................Corelli
Allegro-.....-......Padre Martini
Fantaisie for Piano and Violin,
Op. 159-... . ..........Schubert
Andante Molto
Allegretto
Andantino
Allegreto Vivace
Concerto in A Minor, No. 5
.VieuxtemrS

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stelihorn, Pastor
9:0o A. M.----Sunday School,
10:30 A. M.---Morning Service.
Serrt-n toi.: Tho r-a c

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M. -Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Truth,"
11:45 A. M.--Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

IL

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sta.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
January 25, 1931
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.

11

11

I

I

in1he mrinterie

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan